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Graham Fuller: "A World Without Islam" (FOREIGN POLICY)

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TO: Distinguished Recipients
FM: John Whitbeck
 
Transmitted below is the cover story in the current issue of FOREIGN POLICY (Washington) -- "A World Without Islam" by Graham Fuller, former vice chairman of the National Intelligence Council at the CIA.
 
In forwarding this article to me, Graham described it as "an exercise in historical imagination".
 
It is a knowledgeable, thoughtful and sophisticated exercise which, hopefully, some readers of FOREIGN POLICY may find enlightening.


A WORLD WITHOUT ISLAM

 

FOREIGN POLICY

Jan-Feb 2008

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/users/login.php?story_id=4094&URL=http://www.foreignpolicy.com/story/cms.php?story_id=4094


What if Islam had never existed? To some, it's a comforting thought: No clash of civilizations, no holy wars, no terrorists. Would Christianity have taken over the world? Would the Middle East be a peaceful beacon of democracy? Would 9/11 have happened? In fact, remove Islam from the path of history, and the world ends up pretty much where it is today.

 

 

By Graham E. Fuller
Graham E. Fuller is a former vice chairman of the National Intelligence Council at the CIA in charge of long-range strategic forecasting. He is currently adjunct professor of history at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. He is the author of numerous books about the Middle East, including The Future of Political Islam (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003).


Imagine, if you will, a world without Islam. admittedly an almost inconceivable state of affairs given its charged centrality in our daily news headlines. Islam seems to lie behind a broad range of international disorders: suicide attacks, car bombings, military occupations, resistance struggles, riots, fatwas, jihads, guerrilla warfare, threatening videos, and 9/11 itself. "Islam" seems to offer an instant and uncomplicated analytical touchstone, enabling us to make sense of today's convulsive world. Indeed, for some neoconservatives, "Islamofascism" is now our sworn foe in a looming "World War III".


But indulge me for a moment. What if there were no such thing as Islam? What if there had never been a Prophet Mohammed, no saga of the spread of Islam across vast parts of the Middle East, Asia, and Africa?
Given our intense current focus on terrorism, war, and rampant anti-Americanism—some of the most emotional international issues of the day—it's vital to understand the true sources of these crises. Is Islam, in fact, the source of the problem, or does it tend to lie with other less obvious and deeper factors?

 

For the sake of argument, in an act of historical imagination, picture a Middle East in which Islam had never appeared. Would we then be spared many of the current challenges before us? Would the Middle East be more peaceful? How different might the character of East-West relations be? Without Islam, surely the international order would present a very different picture than it does today. Or would it?


IF NOT ISLAM, THEN WHAT?
From the earliest days of a broader Middle East, Islam has seemingly shaped the cultural norms and even political preferences of its followers. How can we then separate Islam from the Middle East? As it turns out, it's not so hard to imagine.


Let's start with ethnicity. Without Islam, the face of the region still remains complex and conflicted. The dominant ethnic groups of the Middle East-- Arabs, Persians, Turks, Kurds, Jews, even Berbers and Pashtuns--would still dominate politics. Take the Persians: Long before Islam, successive great
Persian empires pushed to the doors of Athens and were the perpetual rivals of whoever inhabited Anatolia. Contesting Semitic peoples, too, fought the Persians across the Fertile Crescent and into Iraq. And then there are the powerful forces of diverse Arab tribes and traders expanding and migrating into other Semitic areas of the Middle East before Islam. Mongols would still have overrun and destroyed the civilizations of Central Asia and much of the Middle East in the 13th century. Turks still would have conquered Anatolia, the Balkans up to Vienna, and most of the Middle East. These struggles--over power, territory, influence, and trade--existed long before Islam arrived.

Dear Sir/Madam,
Thank you very much for your interest in FP and our latest cover story A World Without Islam posted on your blog http://drugaddict.livejournal.com/3113443.html. Im afraid it is FP's policy to ask you to please only post a small extract from this article (no more than the first three paragraphs below). Your readers can then follow your link to our web site if they would like to read the full piece.
 
Please let me know if you have any questions.
 
Thank you very much.
Randolph
__________________________________________
Randolph Manderstam
Syndication Coordinator
Foreign Policy Magazine
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington D.C. 20036
tel: (202) 939-2241
fax: (202) 483-1840

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On January 15th, 2008 12:00 am (UTC), (Anonymous) commented:
Fuller is an expert
about peoples and nations we know little to nothing about. Why do Americans insist on making grandiose judgments based on emotion? If it makes you feel better, it won't for long.

Knowledge and informed judgment are necessary before we send people out to die- not just bread and circuses fervor.

Claudia
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