January 13th, 2009

Chris Keeley

An Unconscionable Legacy”–Veteran White House Correspondent Helen Thomas on the Bush Presidency

An Unconscionable Legacy”–Veteran White House Correspondent Helen Thomas on the Bush Presidency

President Bush held his final news conference Monday. Bush fervently defended his record, saying he made the nation safer following the 9/11 attacks, rejected the idea that the nation’s moral standing has been damaged over the past eight years and defended the government’s response to Hurricane Katrina. We speak with veteran White House correspondent Helen Thomas. She’s the most senior member of the White House press corps and has covered every president since Kennedy. [includes rush transcript–partial]

 

Helen Thomas, served as White House correspondent for United Press International for almost sixty years and has covered every president since Kennedy. She is the most senior member of the White House press corps and is commonly referred to as “The First Lady of the Press.” Helen is currently a syndicated columnist for Hearst Newspapers. Her latest column is called “History Cannot Save Him.”

AMY GOODMAN: With a week to go in his two-term presidency, President Bush gave his final White House news conference Monday. Bush fervently defended his record, saying he made the nation safer following the 9/11 attacks. Asked whether he could now admit to making any mistakes, Bush cited the “Mission Accomplished” banner soon after the invasion of Iraq. He also listed what he called his “disappointments.”

 

    PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: There have been disappointments. Abu Ghraib obviously was a huge disappointment during the presidency. You know, not having weapons of mass destruction was a significant disappointment. I don’t know if you want to call those mistakes or not, but they were—things didn’t go according to plan. Let’s put it that way. And anyway, I think historians will look back, and they’ll be able to have a better look at mistakes after some time has passed. I—along Jake’s question, there is no such thing as short-term history. I don’t think you can possibly get the full breadth of an administration ’til time has passed.


AMY GOODMAN: The President also responded to a question about the responsibility of the office of the President of the United States and how he thought President-elect Barack Obama would handle it.
 

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Chris Keeley

Death of Fourth Person Is Linked to Centreville Heroin Ring

Death of Fourth Person Is Linked to Centreville Heroin Ring

By Jerry Markon
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 13, 2009; B01

 

A fourth person, a 20-year-old Falls Church woman, died from a heroin overdose that has been linked to a Centreville-based drug ring, according to records unsealed yesterday in federal court.

Matthew F. Greenlee, 23, was charged in the Sept. 7 death of Carmen Somers, who took the heroin during a gathering the night before, authorities said. Greenlee appeared yesterday in U.S. District Court in Alexandria as two more young Fairfax County women pleaded guilty to being part of the heroin distribution operation.

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Chris Keeley

TO: Distinguished Recipients FM: John Whitbeck Transmitted below is a front-page story in today's

TO: Distinguished Recipients
FM: John Whitbeck
 
Transmitted below is a front-page story in today's SAUDI GAZETTE which may be of interest.
 
As always, the American president of the day has proven an obedient servant to the bitter end, regardless of the cost to his own country.
 
Will this humiliation ever end?
How Olmert put Rice to shame at UN
OCCUPIED JERUSALEM – US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice was left shame-faced after President George W. Bush ordered her to abstain in a key UN vote on the Gaza war, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert said on Monday.
"She was left shamed. A resolution that she prepared and arranged, and in the end she did not vote in favor," Olmert said in a speech in the southern town of Ashkelon.
The UN Security Council last Thursday called for an immediate ceasefire in the three-week-old conflict in the Gaza Strip and an Israeli withdrawal from Gaza where hundreds have been killed. Fourteen of the council's 15 members voted in favour of the resolution, which was later rejected by both Israel and Hamas. The United States, Israel's main ally, had initially been expected to vote in line with the other 14 but later became the sole abstainee
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