December 1st, 2008

Chris Keeley

Responding to the financial crisis, Klein says, “This is a progressive moment: it’s ours to lose.” P

Responding to the financial crisis, Klein says, “This is a progressive moment: it’s ours to lose.” Photograph by Platon

Responding to the financial crisis, Klein says, “This is a progressive moment: it’s ours to lose.” Photograph by Platon.

In this issue of the magazine, Larissa MacFarquhar profiles the activist Naomi Klein. Here MacFarquhar talks about Klein’s personality and style, and about her book and short film “The Shock Doctrine.”

Listen to the mp3 on the player above, or right-click here to download.


http://www.newyorker.com/online/2008/12/08/081208on_audio_macfarquhar
Chris Keeley

ReHab

Letter From West Hollywood

Special Treatment

The rise of luxury rehab.

by Amanda Fortini December 1, 2008

 
At Wonderland, addicts are permitted to use cell phones and computers. Actors are released to work on films; musicians can tour.

At Wonderland, addicts are permitted to use cell phones and computers. Actors are released to work on films; musicians can tour.

Just before dawn one morning in June, Howard Samuels, the executive director of the Wonderland Center—a private alcohol-and-drug rehab facility in West Hollywood, California—was standing in the spacious foyer of his Craftsman-style house, greeting his publicist, Cathy Griffin. They were about to head over to Fox Studios, where Samuels, who frequently turns up on the punditry circuit when an actor overdoses, relapses, or checks herself in, was scheduled to discuss the recent drug bust of Tatum O’Neal and the apparent bisexuality of Lindsay Lohan, on “The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet.” “Do you want any coffee?” Samuels asked Griffin, adding, “I’ve had two cups already.” Samuels is a recovering cocaine and heroin addict who in August, at the age of fifty-six, celebrated twenty-four years of sobriety. Caffeine is the only addictive substance permitted in the Samuels household. (His thirty-eight-year-old wife, Gabrielle, has also conquered several addictions—alcohol, crystal meth, and compulsive eating.) Samuels is a tall, solidly built man with close-set green eyes, a prominent nose, and lips that cover his teeth when he talks, occasionally giving the impression of missing dentures. He was wearing a gray linen Armani jacket with cuffed jeans and Converse Chuck Taylor sneakers.

“Did you see the New York Post?” Griffin asked, wrestling a manila folder from her slouchy pink-leather purse. She began to brief Samuels on the celebrity stumbles that he’d be discussing. The day before, Tatum O’Neal had been caught attempting to buy crack on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. “Originally, Tatum’s story was that she was researching a role,” Griffin explained. “Now she’s saying her dog’s death prompted the drug buy.”

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Chris Keeley

It has helped eliminate scenes of large groups of drug users shooting up openly in parks and is cred

December 1, 2008
 

Swiss Vote to Keep Program Giving Addicts Heroin

GENEVA (AP) — The world’s most comprehensive legalized heroin program became permanent on Sunday with overwhelming approval from Swiss voters, who separately rejected the legalization of marijuana.

The heroin program, started in 1994, is offered in 23 centers across Switzerland. It has helped eliminate scenes of large groups of drug users shooting up openly in parks and is credited with reducing crime and improving the health and daily lives of addicts.

The nearly 1,300 addicts selected for the program visit one of the centers twice a day to receive a carefully measured dose of heroin produced by a government-approved laboratory.

They keep their paraphernalia in cups labeled with their names, and use the equipment and clean needles to inject themselves under the supervision of nurses. They also get counseling from psychiatrists and social workers.

The United States and the United Nations narcotics board have criticized the program as potentially fueling drug abuse. But it has attracted attention from governments as far away as Australia and Canada, which have started or are considering their own programs modeled on the system.

The Netherlands began a smaller program in 2006, and it serves nearly 600 patients. Britain has allowed individual doctors to prescribe heroin since the 1920s, but it has been running trials similar to the Swiss approach in recent years. Belgium, Germany, Spain and Canada have also been running trial programs.

Of the 2.26 million Swiss who voted in the national referendum, 68 percent approved making the heroin program permanent. But 63 percent voted against the marijuana proposal, which was based on a separate citizens’ initiative to decriminalize consuming marijuana and growing the plant for personal use.