June 5th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Chris and Tarah's engagment Photographs by Joe G. on Sunday, June 1, 2008 at Barry's House!

Chris and Tarah's engagement Photographs by Joe G. on Sunday, June 1, 2008 at Barry's House!

http://tunlaw.org/engmnt/index.html


Chris and Tarah's engagement Photographs by Joe G. on Sunday, June 1, 2008 at Barry's House!

6.1.2008


14 -  Chris and Tarah's engagement Photographs by Joe G. on Sunday, June 1, 2008 at Barry's House!

http://tunlaw.org/sedona.htm

goto  -  http://tunlaw.org/engmnt/index.html

Chris
Chris Keeley

"The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not

"The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother, the ecology, or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny." — Dr. Albert Ellis

Blame robs us of our power, taking it from us and giving it to those we blame. It also robs us of happiness, for how can we be happy when we are always being victimized? The real secret to living the best life possible is in knowing that everything that happens is our choice, and that we have drawn it to us as a way of learning and becoming stronger, surer, self-actualized beings.

If you've tired of the blame game and ready to start living your best life now, the next time a problem occurs, instead of asking "Who's fault is this?" start asking, "Why did I choose this?" "What lesson does this hold for me?" and "Where is the blessing in this?"

Don't worry, the answers will come. Getting questions answered is one of the perks of being in power.

"May you always be quicker to ask than to blame."

{a friend} 
Chris Keeley

Thursday, June 5, 2008; 12:35 PM

Thursday, June 5, 2008; 12:35 PM

 

President Bush and his top aides repeatedly exaggerated what they knew about the threat from Iraqi nuclear, biological and chemical weapons as the administration pressed its case for war against Iraq, the Senate intelligence committee said today in a long-awaited report.

While most of the administration's pre-war claims about Iraq reflected now-discredited U.S. intelligence reports, the White House crossed a line by conveying certainty about Saddam Hussein's ability to threaten the United States with weapons of mass destruction, according to the report approved by the committee's Democratic leaders and a handful of Republicans.

"In making the case for war, the administration repeatedly presented intelligence as fact when it was unsubstantiated, contradicted or even non-existent," committee chairman Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) said at a news conference. "As a result, the American people were led to believe that the threat from Iraq was much greater than actually existed."

 
Chris Keeley

A Grateful Dead poster designed in 1966 by Mr. Kelley.

A Grateful Dead poster designed in 1966 by Mr. Kelley. More Photos > 

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/06/04/arts/20080605_KELLEY_SLIDESHOW_index.html





Alton Kelley, left, and his longtime collaborator, Stanley Mouse, in 1967

June 4, 2008

Alton Kelley, 67, Artist of the 1960s Rock Counterculture, Dies

Alton Kelley, whose psychedelic concert posters for artists like the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, and Big Brother and the Holding Company helped define the visual style of the 1960s counterculture, died on Sunday at his home in Petaluma, Calif. He was 67.

The cause was complications of osteoporosis, said his wife, Marguerite Trousdale Kelley.

Mr. Kelley and his longtime collaborator, Stanley Mouse, combined sinuous Art Nouveau lettering and outré images plucked from sources near and far to create the visual equivalent of an acid trip. A 19th-century engraving from “The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam” inspired a famous poster for a Grateful Dead concert at the Avalon Ballroom in 1966 that showed a skeleton wearing a garland of roses on its skull and holding a wreath of roses on its left arm.

The Grateful Dead later adopted this image as its emblem. Mr. Kelley and Mr. Mouse also designed several of the group’s album covers, including “American Beauty” and “Workingman’s Dead.”

Mr. Kelley was born in Houlton, Me., and grew up in Connecticut, where his parents moved to work in defense plants during World War II. His mother, a former schoolteacher, encouraged him to study art, and for a time he attended art schools in Philadelphia and New York, but his real passion was racing motorcycles and hot rods. He applied his artistic training to painting pinstripes on motorcycle gas tanks.

Collapse )