May 19th, 2008

Chris Keeley

the Jewish billionaires from America (who also paid for the extravaganza).

Uri Avnery

17.5.08

 

                                    With Friends Like These

 

LATELY WE are flooded with friends. The Great of the Earth, past and present, come here to flatter us, to fawn on us, to grovel at our feet.

 

"God, save me from my friends, my enemies I can deal with myself!" says an old prayer.

 

They disgust me.

 

 

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Chris Keeley

Einstein consistently characterized the idea of a personal God who answers prayers as naive, and lif

Einstein consistently characterized the idea of a personal God who answers prayers as naive, and life after death as wishful thinking. But his continual references to God — as a metaphor for physical law; in his famous rebuke to quantum mechanics, “God doesn’t play dice”; and in lines like the endlessly repeated, “ Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind” — has led some wishful thinkers to try to put him in the camp of some kind of believer or even, not long ago, to paint him as an advocate of intelligent design.

Trying to distinguish between a personal God and a more cosmic force, Einstein described himself as an “agnostic” and “not an atheist,” which he associated with the same intolerance as religious fanatics. “They are creatures who — in their grudge against the traditional ‘opium for the people’ — cannot bear the music of the spheres.”

The problem of God, he said, “is too vast for our limited minds.”

Einstein’s latest words offer scant comfort to the traditionally faithful.

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Chris Keeley

Bush unloads his blunderbuss on the Arab World

 Date: Mon, May 19, 2008 at 8:44 AM
Subject: Bush lectures Arab world on political reform, women's rights
To: Undisclosed-Recipient


On departing the Middle East, Bush unloads his blunderbuss on the Arab World.  It was hardly a contribution to peace in the Middle East.
 
QUOTED EXCERPT:    Bush arrived back in Washington late Sunday with little to show for the trip. Saudi Arabia rebuffed his plea for help with soaring oil prices, Egypt's leader questioned his seriousness about peacemaking and there was not enough progress in the peace talks to warrant a three-way meeting of Bush with Israeli and Palestinian leaders.   END QUOTE
 
Regards,  John
Chris Keeley

Eddie Adams... Marine Crossfire, Vietnam, 1965 (Archival Epson Print). From the exhibition Eddie Ada

Eddie Adams... Marine Crossfire, Vietnam, 1965 (Archival Epson Print). From the exhibition Eddie Adams: Armed With A Camera at the Monroe Gallery of Photography. "...The exhibition of more than 65 photographs spans the entire range of Adams' legendary career, and includes rare vintage work prints from the personal studio collection of Eddie Adams. This year marks with the 40th anniversary of Adam's iconic 'Street Execution of a Vietcong prisoner', taken in 1968 in Saigon during the height of the Vietnam War. The shocking photograph, of the Chief of Police shooting a member of the Vietcong in the head, instantly appeared in newspapers and magazines world-wide and has been widely credited with turning American popular sentiment against the Vietnam War."

http://www.monroegallery.com/showcase/images/Vietnam_Woman_w_Baby.jpg
Chris Keeley

A Few Too Many - Is there any hope for the hung over?

by Joan Acocella



Of the miseries regularly inflicted on humankind, some are so minor and yet, while they last, so painful that one wonders how, after all this time, a remedy cannot have been found. If scientists do not have a cure for cancer, that makes sense. But the common cold, the menstrual cramp? The hangover is another condition of this kind. It is a preventable malady: don’t drink. Nevertheless, people throughout time have found what seemed to them good reason for recourse to alcohol. One attraction is alcohol’s power to disinhibit—to allow us, at last, to tell off our neighbor or make an improper suggestion to his wife. Alcohol may also persuade us that we have found the truth about life, a comforting experience rarely available in the sober hour. Through the lens of alcohol, the world seems nicer. (“I drink to make other people interesting,” the theatre critic George Jean Nathan used to say.) For all these reasons, drinking cheers people up. See Proverbs 31:6-7: “Give . . . wine unto those that be of heavy hearts. Let him drink, and forget his poverty, and remember his misery no more.” It works, but then, in the morning, a new misery presents itself.

A hangover peaks when alcohol that has been poured into the body is finally eliminated from it—that is, when the

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Chris Keeley

Achebe at home in Annandale-on-Hudson. Photograph by Steve Pyke.

Achebe at home in Annandale-on-Hudson. Photograph by Steve Pyke.

Achebe at home in Annandale-on-Hudson. Photograph by Steve Pyke.

by Ruth Franklin

Chinua Achebe and the great African novel.

In a myth told by the Igbo people of Nigeria, men once decided to send a messenger to ask Chuku, the supreme god, if the dead could be permitted to come back to life. As their messenger, they chose a dog. But the dog delayed, and a toad, which had been eavesdropping, reached Chuku first. Wanting to punish man, the toad reversed the request, and told Chuku that after death men did not want to return to the world. The god said that he would do as they wished, and when the dog arrived with the true message he refused to change his mind. Thus, men may be born again, but only in a different form.

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Chris Keeley

Fleming died in 1964, at 56, of complications from pleurisy after playing a round of golf in Oxfords

Remembering Fleming, Ian Fleming

LONDON — Any writer who has struggled to “do the words” would take heart from the self-effacing assessment written for himself by Ian Fleming, the raffish Englishman born 100 years ago this month who became one of the most successful authors of his time through the creation of the world’s best-loved spy, James Bond. 

Fleming died in 1964, at 56, of complications from pleurisy after playing a round of golf in Oxfordshire though he had a heavy cold. But the real culprits were years of smoking up to 80 cigarettes a day, and a fondness for drink. Perhaps because of the difficulty he found in resisting life’s indulgences, he adopted a strict writing routine in his last 12 years, the period in which he wrote more than a dozen Bond novels that spawned the multibillion-dollar film franchise.

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Chris Keeley

RE/Search's V. Vale on maker culture and punk rock

RE/Search's V. Vale on maker culture and punk rock
Researchhh
BB pal and inspiration V. Vale is the publisher of RE/Search, chronicles of underground and fringe culture since 1977. The RE/Search books, from Industrial Culture Handbook and Pranks! to Modern Primitives and Incredibly Strange Music, are essential encyclopedias of alternative thought, art, music, literature, and methods to circumvent "control" in all its manifestations. (Pranks!, Industrial Culture Handbook, and RE/SEARCH #4/5: Burroughs, Gysin, Throbbing Gristle are now available in limited edition hardcover!) Vale attended the recent Maker Faire Bay Area and was blown away by the connections he saw between the hacker/maker/crafter culture and what he suggests are the original, unspoken "principles" of punk rock: DIY, Mutual Aid, Anti-Authoritarianism, and Black Humor. Vale saw all those characteristics embodied at the Maker Faire and, inspired, wrote a wonderful piece about what the Faire meant to him. Here's an excerpt from Vale's RE/Search blog post, "Maker Faire and Punk Rock":
The first, quintessential principle of “Punk Rock” was (obviously) “DO-IT-YOURSELF”… meaning Create All Your Own Culture: music, recordings, record labels, distribution, “Punk Rock” stores, art, graphic art, collages, drawings, interior decor, your clothing, hairstyles, sculpture/installations, social gatherings, community centers, squats or shared housing, art studios, shows — everything that makes your life “meaningful” and “fun.” And this “principle” made EVERYONE at least a naive or “outsider” artist, if not more...

Well, for more than thirty years Punk’s “Do-It-Yourself” signified (to me, at least) Doing It Yourself — but pretty much restricted to the “Arts.” But for the first time we attended last weekend’s Maker Faire and realized that: Why shouldn’t D-I-Y also apply to Science and Technology? (Now, we had ALMOST thought that, years ago, when Survival Research Laboratories began, but — we’re dense.)...

In other words, for thirty years the underlying message of all my publications has remained: “Everyone Is An Artist.” But, now I want to add an additional message: “Everyone Is A Scientist” — or, “Everyone is an Artist/Scientist.” Because, who doesn’t want to figure out how things work? ”
Link    -->  http://www.researchpubs.com/Blog/
Chris Keeley

Los Angeles, CA—Aimee Mann has collaborated with critically acclaimed visual artist Gary Taxali on h

Los Angeles, CA—Aimee Mann has collaborated with critically acclaimed visual artist Gary Taxali on her 7th solo release @#%&! Smilers, to be released on June 3, 2008 on her own SuperEgo Records. Taxali has contributed 17 original illustrations for the packaging of the CD, art directed by Aimee Mann and Gail Marowitz, and designed by Marowitz and Ed Sherman. Los Angeles art gallery La Luz De Jesus will host a CD release party and one night showing of the 17 new artworks on May 31st from 6-9pm. Both Taxali and Mann will be present to sign copies of the new CD.



Gary Taxali is an award-winning illustrator who has worked for such clients as Rolling Stone, Time, Esquire and The New York Times. His work has received recognition from Graphis, Communication Arts, American Illustration, Print, SPD, a Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators, a Gold Medal from the National Addys and a nomination for a Cannes Lion. He is a Founding Member of IPA (The Illustrators' Partnership of America) and sits on the Advisory Board of 3x3: The Magazine of Contemporary Illustration. Gary's latest toy figures, "Oh No" and Oh Oh", were mass produced by his new company, Chump Inc. His first children's book, which he wrote and illustrated, "This Is Silly", is being published by Scholastic and slated for a summer 2009 release. This summer, he will be having his first major show in Europe at "Iguapop Gallery" in Barcelona, Spain. Taxali lives and works in Toronto, Canada.

Aimee Mann has long championed visual artists, collaborating with them to create her work-of-art CD packages. In 2003 she teamed with literary comic book writer and artist Seth who illustrated her CD Lost In Space. In 2006 Aimee Mann and Gail Marowitz won a Grammy award for Best Recording Package for their work on Mann’s Forgotten Arm, illustrated by painter Owen Smith, a five time cover artist for the New Yorker.