May 16th, 2008

Chris Keeley

As Palestinians Mark 60th Anniversary of Their Dispossession, a Conversation with Palestinian Writer

As Palestinians Mark 60th Anniversary of Their Dispossession, a Conversation with Palestinian Writer and Doctor Ghada Karmi

Today is the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel, what Palestinians call the Nakba, or catastrophe, that resulted in the expulsion and dispossession of over 750,000 Palestinians from their cities and villages. Ghada Karmi is a well-known Palestinian writer and medical doctor from Jerusalem who lives in Britain. She has written several books about Palestinian history and her own experience as a refugee, including In Search of Fatima: A Palestinian Story and, most recently, Married to Another Man: Israel’s Dilemma in Palestine.

Ghada Karmi, Palestinian writer and doctor, one of the hundreds of thousands forced to flee in 1948. She is currently a research fellow at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter. She has written several books about Palestinian history and her own experience, including In Search of Fatima: A Palestinian Story and, most recently, Married to Another Man: Israel’s Dilemma in Palestine

AMY GOODMAN: Today is the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel, what Palestinians call the Nakba, or catastrophe, that resulted in the expulsion and dispossession of over 750,000 Palestinians from cities and villages.

 

Tomorrow, a discussion with Israeli historian Benny Morris. Today, I talk to Palestinian writer and doctor Ghada Karmi, one of the hundreds of thousands forced to flee in 1948. Ghada Karmi is a well known Palestinian writer and medical doctor from Jerusalem who lives in Britain now. She is currently a research fellow at the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies at the University of Exeter. She has written several books about Palestinian history and her own experience, including In Search of Fatima: A Palestinian Story and, most recently, Married to Another Man: Israel’s Dilemma in Palestine.

 

I began by asking Ghada Karmi what happened to her family in 1948.

    GHADA KARMI: I was in a house in West Jerusalem. I had been born in that part of Jerusalem. And I was a child. I was eight, and I didn’t understand actually what was happening. Nobody talked to us really or told us what was really happening. But what I do remember is that everybody was very scared. And I wrote about this in my memoir, In Search of Fatima.

    It was a very bad period in my life,

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Chris Keeley

Vanunu - great political battle in Norway - a lawyers appeal

 Vanunu - great political battle in Norway - a lawyers appeal 
fyi

William R. Polk

669 Chemin de la Sine

F-06140 Vence France

fax: +33-493 24 08 77


Begin forwarded message:

From: "Fredrik S. Heffermehl"
Date: May 15, 2008 5:36:40 PM GMT+02:00
To: Mailing List IALANA and progressive European lawyers
Subject: Vanunu - great political battle in Norway - a lawyers appeal -

Oslo, May 15, 2008

Dear colleague,

In the last 6 weeks there has been a tremendous interest in Norway for the
liberation of Mordechai Vanunu, Israel´s nuclear hostage. The media have
given extensive and sympathetic coverage, and the cabinet obviously is
under strong pressure to stop ignoring the many calls for action in the matter.

The launch of the Lawyers´ appeal yesterday was a media success. An
editorial in a main Oslo paper today, said that the pressure on the cabinet
is building and called the lawyer´s appeal a very heavyweight contribution.
Earlier appeals for a strong Norwegian intervention to protect Vanunu´s security
and human rights have been made by the 2005 congress of all Trade Unions,
a month ago by the Council of Norwegian Bishops. Generally there is both a
strong feeling of sorrow and indignation in Norway about the plight of Vanunu.

A translation into English of the lawyers´ appeal is attached. In Norwegian
you will find it on the web with the lists of signatories, at this address:

You may not be able to decipher all the titles in Norwegian. A delicate point is
that the petition has been signed by 2 Judges of the Supreme Court. Further,
the signatories include around 20-25 "professors dr. of law" and a very solid
list of over 60 lawyers involved in foreigners law, immigration, asylum and
refugee law, human rights and international law. This just is not something to
be ignored - the petition makes it clear that legal formalities and the arguments
used by several Norwegian governments as a fig leaf to excuse inaction, are
clearly untenable law. The point is that the fact that MV is in his "home country"
iss no bar to granting him asylum and a Norwegian passport and protection.

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Chris Keeley

LUCIUS DURHAM BATTLE (1918-2008)

 
LUCIUS DURHAM BATTLE (1918-2008)

Chairman, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Advisory Board

In Memoriam and Appreciation


It is with a heavy heart that I report sad news. Longtime Chairman of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations' National Advisory Board, the inimitable Ambassador Lucius Durham Battle, died Tuesday, May 13, 2008. He had been suffering from Parkinson's disease for quite some time. On June 1, he would have turned 90.

What I have to say here is based entirely on conversations I have been privileged to have with Ambassador Battle over the past 35 years. It will undoubtedly be different, in some ways less detailed, and in places possibly not as accurate as what others may have to say. It is a memory and appreciation of the life of Lucius Durham Battle. Although no one is bereft of blemish, what I have to say is as accurate as I can make it and also as impressionistic a portrait as I could hope to paint of an extraordinary person. I apologize in advance if these remarks are less enlightening or insightful than what one may hear in forthcoming eulogies or read in the days to come in
The Washington Post or the New York Times.

Lucius Durham Battle was born in Dawson, Georgia on June 1, 1918. After pre-collegiate schooling in Bradenton, Florida, he attended the University of Florida, from which he received both his undergraduate degree and a degree in law. After serving in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific during World War Two, he applied to and was accepted into the U.S. Foreign Service. Like any entry level officer, his early responsibilities were not exactly of a routine nature. Neither were they of a kind that determined the world's daily orbit. Among his earliest assignments was service on the staff of Secretary of State George C. Marshall up to and through the time when the Marshall Plan, drafted and declared in June 1947, and for which Marshal was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, proceeded to help rebuild West European economies that had been devastated in World War Two. He then joined the staff of Marshall's successor, Secretary of State Dean Acheson, for whom he served as the Department's Executive Secretary throughout Secretary Acheson's tenure, which included the onset and most of the duration of the Korean War. Subsequently, during the first Eisenhower administration, Battle was assigned to the post of First Secretary at the American Embassy in Denmark from 1953-1955. From there he was seconded from 1955-1956 to NATO in Paris, where he served as secretary to NATO Secretary General Lord Ismay. Battle resigned from the Foreign Service in 1956 and aided in the restoration of Williamsburg, Virginia as Vice-President of Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., from 1956 to 1961, when he returned to the Department of State under President Kennedy.

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Chris Keeley

Anna U Davis

 
Anna U Davis
Monday, 05 May 2008

Robotic-like faces intermingle with picture perfect hair from glossy magazines. Not your everyday juxtaposition of subject matter or materials, but Anna U Davis is attempting to tell a larger story with her unlikely imagery. Her recent solo show at Washington DC’s Hillyer Art Space opened this Saturday, but spend some time with more of her work at www.frocasians.com

Chris Keeley

Israeli Writer-Activist Tikva Honig-Parnass, Who Fought for Israel’s Founding in 1948, on 60 Years o

Israeli Writer-Activist Tikva Honig-Parnass, Who Fought for Israel’s Founding in 1948, on 60 Years of Palestinian Dispossession and Occupation

We continue our coverage of the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of the state of Israel, what Palestinians call the Nakba, or catastrophe. We begin with Tikva Honig-Parnass, an Israeli who fought with Jewish paramilitary units and the Israeli army, participating in the military operations that expelled over 750,000 Palestinians. Today, she’s an anti-Zionist leftist writer and activist who has been involved with anti-occupation, women’s, and Mizrahi movements in Israel since the 1960s

Tikva Honig-Parnass, Anti-Zionist leftist writer and activist, has been involved with anti-occupation, women’s, and Mizrahi movements in Israel since the 1960s. She was the editor of News From Within, the publication of the Alternative Information Center in Jerusalem, for close to a decade. More recently she founded and edited the periodical Between the Lines with Palestinian activist Toufic Haddad. In 1948, she fought with Jewish paramilitary units and the Israeli army, participating in the military operations that expelled over 750,000 Palestinians.

AMY GOODMAN: We continue with our coverage of the sixtieth anniversary

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Chris Keeley

HIV-Positive Man Sentenced to 35 Years for Spitting at Officers

HIV-Positive Man Sentenced to 35 Years for Spitting at Officers

In Dallas, Texas, an HIV-positive homeless man has been sentenced to thirty-five years in prison for spitting in the mouth and eye of a Dallas police officer. The man, Willie Campbell, was found guilty of harassing a public servant with a deadly weapon—his saliva. None of the three officers contracted HIV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there are no known cases of contact with saliva, tears or sweat transmitting HIV. Campbell will not be eligible for parole until serving at least seventeen years behind bars.

Chiding Obama, Bush Likens Iran Talks to Hitler Appeasement

Meanwhile in Israel, a visiting President Bush continued to take part in Israel’s sixtieth anniversary celebrations. Speaking before the Israeli parliament, Bush took a swipe at Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama,comparing his call to negotiate with Iran to the appeasement of Hitler before the Second World War.

President Bush: “Some seem to believe we should negotiate with the terrorists and radicals, as if some ingenious argument will persuade them they have been wrong all along. We have heard this foolish delusion before. As Nazi tanks crossed into Poland in 1939, an American senator declared, ’Lord, if only I could have talked to Hitler, all this might have been avoided.’ We have an obligation to call this what it is: the false comfort of appeasement, which has been repeatedly discredited by history.”

In a statement, Obama’s campaign denounced Bush’s remarks, calling them an “unprecedented political attack on foreign soil.”

Palestinians Denounce Bush Visit to Israel

Palestinians, meanwhile, continue to protest Bush’s visit. Hamas spokesperson Sami Abu Zuhri condemned Bush’s support for Israeli settlement expansion and rejection of a ceasefire in Gaza.

Sami Abu Zuhri: “We believe that Bush’s visit to the region and his speech represented a slap on the face of all those who bet on the project of compromise. The American administration is a partner in the aggression against
our people by supporting the Israeli side.”

Palestinians are marking the sixtieth anniversary of what they call the Nakba, or catastrophe, when hundreds of thousands were forced to flee their homes during the war around Israel’s creation in 1948.

Residents: US Attack Kills 18 in Pakistan

In Pakistan, local residents say eighteen people have been killed in a US attack in the Bajaur region. The dead included several civilians and foreign militants. Taliban spokesperson Maulvi Omar said he’s certain the strike came from a US drone.

Maulvi Omar: “We are absolutely certain that these aircraft were US drones, the ones that NATO forces use in Afghanistan. It is a shame that our boundaries are being crossed and foreign aircraft violate our airspace. But
God willing, we will avenge this brutality very soon.”

The attack would be at least the fourth by a US drone in Pakistan this year. The Pakistani government is currently negotiating with militant groups on a peace agreement. The Bush administration has opposed the talks.

Chris Keeley

Since Polaroid announced in February that it would stop manufacturing instant film and that supplies

Since Polaroid announced in February that it would stop manufacturing instant film and that supplies would run out next year, artists like Chuck Close and Lucas Samaras have been passing through stages of grief. Nothing, they say, can replace the Polaroid — awkward, dated, a little sleazy, but miraculous nonetheless




Robert Mapplethorpe’s “Untitled (Patti Smith),” a 1973 Polaroid. 

Spontaneity Was the Medium and the Message

Since Polaroid announced in February that it would stop manufacturing instant film and that supplies would run out next year, artists like Chuck Close and Lucas Samaras have been passing through stages of grief. Nothing, they say, can replace the Polaroid — awkward, dated, a little sleazy, but miraculous nonetheless.

The beloved instant photograph could not have hoped for a better sendoff than the Whitney’s exhibition of Robert Mapplethorpe’s Polaroids. During his 20s, between 1970 and 1975, Mapplethorpe made more than 1,500 photographs with Polaroid cameras. This may surprise viewers who are more familiar with his posed and polished studio photography of the ’80s.

“Polaroids: Mapplethorpe” offers some

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Chris Keeley

Bacon’s ‘Dyer’ Expected

Bacon’s ‘Dyer’ Expected

To Attract Big Numbers

When an artist’s works begin fetching astronomical prices, other works by him or her will almost inevitably, and immediately, come to auction. Francis Bacon fits that bill; in the last year nine of his paintings have each fetched more than $25 million, and a 1976 triptych sold for $86.3 million at Sotheby’s on Wednesday night, becoming the most expensive work of contemporary art ever sold at auction.

So it is not surprising that at Sotheby’s next big contemporary-art auction, in London on July 1, one of the star paintings will be “Study for Head of George Dyer,” a 1967 portrait Bacon painted of his companion, who committed suicide in 1971.

Although 129 photographs of Dyer were discovered in Bacon’s studio after his death in 1992, this portrait is one of only two he painted in a 14-by-12-inch format. Bacon’s inspiration was a photograph of Dyer taken by John Deakin.

While Sotheby’s is not saying who is selling the painting, experts familiar with Bacon’s work say it belongs to Ian and Mercedes Stoutzker, who bought it from the Marlborough Gallery only two months after it was painted. Sotheby’s estimates a price of about $15.5 million.

“It is one of the most literal translations Bacon did after a photograph,” said Oliver Barker, of Sotheby’s contemporary-art department in London.