May 14th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Almost Arrested for Taking Photos at Union Station

http://www.andycarvin.com/

Almost Arrested for Taking Photos at Union Station

As some of you may know, I've been testing out a Gigapan panorama photo system over the last week, after I received a loaner of their robotic camera mount from Carnegie Mellon's robotics lab. I brought it in to NPR to demonstrate it to colleagues and go on a photo safari to photograph the architecture at Union Station. Apparently, as far as Union Station's security operations are concerned, that's a criminal offense, since we nearly got arrested.

Here's a low-res version of the photo. Click the image to see the extreme high-res, half-a-gigapixel Gigapan version. (Don't worry, it loads dynamically, so don't worry about the size of the pic.)

The Panorama That Almost Got Me Arrested

Continue reading "Almost Arrested for Taking Photos at Union Station"

http://www.andycarvin.com/

Chris Keeley

Investigators gingerly peeled back the brittle lining of the small caskets buried a century ago in a

 Investigators gingerly peeled back the brittle lining of the small caskets buried a century ago in a Forest Park cemetery, revealing the remains of three children—orange-stained ribs, leg bones, pieces of skull. They were jarringly mingled with hair and bits of charred tissue, hinting at the house fire that finally put authorities on the trail of a cunning serial killer.

Belle Gunness with her children Philip Gunness (on lap), Myrtle and Lucy Sorenson (right), in late 19th or early 20th century.

"We couldn't have asked for anything better than this," said forensic anthropologist Stephen Nawrocki on the condition of the bones of a 5-year-old boy found in one of the metal caskets. "This is going to come out just beautifully."

The exhumations were part of a broadening quest to shed light on the mystery of Belle Gunness, a wealthy widow accused of murdering as many as 30 men, women and children, often dismembering the bodies at her hilltop farm in LaPorte, Ind.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Daido Moriyama: The 80s, Vintage Prints at Steven Kasher Gallery in New York.

Daido Moriyama: The 80s, Vintage Prints at Steven Kasher Gallery in New York.

Daido Moriyama: The 80s, Vintage Prints

Memory of Dog 3 Daido Moriyama... Memory of Dog 3 (1982, Vintage gelatin silver, printed 1982, 10 x 12 inches). From the exhibition Daido Moriyama: The 80s, Vintage Prints at Steven Kasher Gallery in New York. "...The 1980s finds Moriyama at his most lyrical. With the extreme provocations of his 60s and 70s work behind him, he turns to a plainer, more centered investigation of everyday life. His camera and his printing (he makes all his prints himself) are voracious, hungry all the time. He seems to be intent on finding beauty and meaning in every scrap and horizon that the sun reveals to his eye. The vintage prints in this show have an immediacy and rawness not found in the modern prints that are usually on the market."

http://www.stevenkasher.com/html/exhibresults.asp?exnum=850