May 5th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Amy Winehouse has abandoned work on the theme song for the forthcoming James Bond film, “Quantum of

Amy Winehouse has abandoned work on the theme song for the forthcoming James Bond film, “Quantum of Solace,” The Associated Press reported. Mark Ronson, her producer, said Ms. Winehouse, whose troubles with drugs and law enforcement have been well documented, is “not ready to record any music.” ... Nicole Kidman will star in and produce a film based on the life of Dusty Springfield, the English pop singer who died in 1999; her success masked mental and physical illness and problems with drugs and alcohol, Variety reported. ...
Chris Keeley

Who says big ideas are rare? - by Malcolm Gladwell

 Who says big ideas are rare?

Nathan Myhrvold met Jack Horner on the set of the “Jurassic Park” sequel in 1996. Horner is an eminent paleontologist, and was a consultant on the movie. Myhrvold was there because he really likes dinosaurs. Between takes, the two men got to talking, and Horner asked Myhrvold if he was interested in funding dinosaur expeditions.

Myhrvold is of Nordic extraction, and he looks every bit the bearded, fair-haired Viking—not so much the tall, ferocious kind who raped and pillaged as the impish, roly-poly kind who stayed home by the fjords trying to turn lead into gold. He is gregarious, enthusiastic, and nerdy on an epic scale. He graduated from high school at fourteen. He started Microsoft’s research division, leaving, in 1999, with hundreds of millions. He is obsessed with aperiodic tile patterns. (Imagine a floor tiled in a pattern that never repeats.) When Myhrvold built his own house, on the shores of Lake Washington, outside Seattle—a vast, silvery hypermodernist structure described by his wife as the place in the sci-fi movie where the aliens live—he embedded some sixty aperiodic patterns in the walls, floors, and ceilings. His front garden is planted entirely with vegetation from the Mesozoic era. (“If the ‘Jurassic Park’ thing happens,” he says, “this is where the dinosaurs will come to eat.”) One of the scholarly achievements he is proudest of is a paper he co-wrote proving that it was theoretically possible for sauropods—his favorite kind of dinosaur—to have snapped their tails back and forth faster than the speed of sound. How could he say no to the great Jack Horner?

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Chris Keeley

by Malcolm Gladwell - it to anyone until he had spent nearly a month in Washington making frequent

 paper nor even mention it to anyone until he had spent nearly a month in Washington making frequent visits to the Patent Office, and until Bell’s notarized specifications had for several days been the admiration of at least some of “the people in the Patent Office.” . . . It is easier to believe that a conception already forming in Gray’s mind was precipitated by rumors of what Bell was about to patent, than to believe that chance alone brought Gray to inspiration and action at that precise moment.  - by Malcolm Gladwell

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