April 28th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Sudipto

Dear Mr Keeley
I am an Indian, living in Calcutta, India. I had gone to visit some
friends in the US in 2002, who lived in Washington DC (Adams Morgan)
and stayed there for three weeks.
One of the things that I wanted to see in America was the ghettos of
the big cities, especially of DC and NYC. Regrettably enough, my hosts
did not allow me to go to any of them. They said not only was it
terribly dangerous, even a drive through any of the infamous "war
zones" was fraught with the very real possibility of harassment in the
hands of the police when one came out. We would be suspected as
customers for drugs and would invite frisking by the police etc. My
friends were white Americans.
On and off I have searched the net to see some photographs of real
life on the streets of Washington DC. However, all one gets to see on
the net are those pretty photographs of nice large buildings (Capitol,
White House etc), in which I have very little interest.
I consider myself lucky that I finally came across your website and
had a look at most of the photographs that you have taken, including
the ones that I was seeking for so long. Thank you very much. I wish
you all the very best in your efforts to detox addicts. And wish them
all speedy recovery.
If you ever choose to come to India, please drop a line.
Regards
Sudipto
Chris Keeley

Safaris have come a long way from pith helmets and visions of "Out of Africa." These days, you can r

Safaris have come a long way from pith helmets and visions of "Out of Africa." These days, you can ride a bike into the enormous Ngorongoro Crater in Tanzania, take a river safari through Botswana's Okavango Delta, drive across the open plains of Kenya's Masai Mara and watch the famous wildebeest migration, or get away from the crowds and sneak up on lions on foot -- with an armed guard, of course

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/artsandliving/travel/features/2008/safari/index.html



Options vary wildly in terms of animal sightings, landscape, culture and cost. You can camp out in a conventional tent, stay in a kid-friendly lodge, bunk with villagers or splurge on a bush camp in the wilderness where your "tent" comes with a queen-size bed and a shower under the stars. Roughing it is optional in the bush these days.

 

In many ways, there has never been a better time to visit Africa. The demise of apartheid in the early 1990s and the subsequent end to wars in southern Africa have made South Africa a thriving destination and put countries throughout the region, particularly traditionally peaceful countries such as Zambia and Botswana, back on the tourist map. A sad exception is Zimbabwe, where a once-strong safari industry has suffered along with the rest of the country's economic fortunes. But happily, after more than two months of ethnic violence in Kenya, hopes are high that a power-sharing agreement will return stability to the country and its mammoth travel industry.

 

In this special section, we compare safari experiences in Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and South Africa. We tell you how to plan your own safari, with tips on cutting costs, when and where to go, choosing a tour operator and lodging options. Still can't decide? Our Safari-O-Matic chart shows how many of the "Big Five" animals you can find in Africa's most popular national parks plus our picks for other highlights. So go wild. 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/artsandliving/travel/features/2008/safari/index.html
Chris Keeley

Mr. Fritzl, 73, had kept one of his daughters imprisoned for 24 years in a basement dungeon, where s

April 29, 2008
Austria Says Man Locked Up Daughter
By MARK LANDLER

AMSTETTEN, Austria — With his Mercedes-Benz and the rings on his fingers, Josef Fritzl looked every inch a property owner, neighbors in this tidy Austrian town said Monday. Even when running errands, they said, he wore a natty jacket, crisp shirt and tie.

Mr. Fritzl’s apartment house, its back garden obscured by a tall hedge, was his kingdom, one neighbor said, and interlopers were not welcome. On Monday, investigators in white jumpsuits combed the house and garden for clues. The authorities said Sunday that Mr. Fritzl, 73, had kept one of his daughters imprisoned for 24 years in a basement dungeon, where she bore him seven children.

The daughter, Elisabeth, now 42, is in psychiatric care, along with two of her children. Her eldest daughter, Kerstin, 19, who was also kept in the basement and whose illness pulled apart Mr. Fritzl’s secret after he had her taken to a local hospital, was in a medically induced coma and was in critical condition, the authorities said.

 
April 29, 2008    
Police Niederoesterreich, via Associated Press

Josef Fritzl, in a photo released by the Austrian police.


The authorities said Mr. Fritzl confessed Monday to imprisonment, sexual abuse and incest. The case has left this town of 22,000 people, 80 miles west of Vienna, in stunned disbelief. Neighbors milled around the three-story apartment building on Monday, watching the investigation unfold and asking how such an atrocity could have occurred in their midst.

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Chris Keeley

Mr. White emphasized the need to “elevate the person you’re working with, instead of elevating the t

April 28, 2008
Michael White, 59, Dies; Used Stories as Therapy
By JEREMY PEARCE

Michael White, a social worker and family therapist who developed an innovative and highly practical technique using storytelling to help patients of all ages deal with childhood traumas, died on April 4 in San Diego. He was 59.

The cause was a heart attack, said a spokeswoman from the Dulwich Centre, a counseling service in Adelaide, Australia, where Mr. White had practiced family therapy since the early 1980s.

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Chris Keeley

Pariah Diplomacy By JIMMY CARTER Atlanta A COUNTERPRODUCTIVE Washington policy in recent years has

Pariah Diplomacy

Atlanta

A COUNTERPRODUCTIVE Washington policy in recent years has been to boycott and punish political factions or governments that refuse to accept United States mandates. This policy makes difficult the possibility that such leaders might moderate their policies.

Two notable examples are in Nepal and the Middle East. About 12 years ago, Maoist guerrillas took up arms in an effort to overthrow the monarchy and change the nation’s political and social life. Although the United States declared the revolutionaries to be terrorists, the Carter Center agreed to help mediate among the three major factions: the royal family, the old-line political parties and the Maoists.

In 2006, six months after the oppressive monarch was stripped of his powers, a cease-fire was signed. Maoist combatants laid down their arms and Nepalese troops agreed to remain in their barracks. Our center continued its involvement and nations — though not the United States — and international organizations began working with all parties to reconcile the dispute and organize elections.

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Chris Keeley

April 27, 2008 In Zimbabwe Jail: A Reporter’s Ordeal By BARRY BEARAK HARARE, Zimbabwe — I had never

April 27, 2008

In Zimbabwe Jail: A Reporter’s Ordeal

HARARE, Zimbabwe — I had never been arrested before and the prospect of prison in Zimbabwe, one of the poorest, most repressive places on earth, seemed especially forbidding: the squalor, the teeming cells, the possibility of beatings. But I told myself what I’d repeatedly taught my two children: Life is a collection of experiences. You savor the good, you learn from the bad.

I was being charged with the crime of “committing journalism.” One of my captors, Detective Inspector Dani Rangwani, described the offense to me as something despicable, almost hissing the words: “You’ve been gathering, processing and disseminating the news.”

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Chris Keeley

Stella Rotaru, at left, of the International Organization for Migration, with one of the group’s ben

Stella Rotaru, at left, of the International Organization for Migration, with one of the group’s beneficiaries. Photograph by Bela Doka.

Stella Rotaru, at left, of the International Organization for Migration, with one of the group’s beneficiaries. Photograph by Bela Doka.

Rescuing the victims of the global sex trade.
by William Finnegan May 5, 2008

Stella Rotaru’s cell-phone number is scribbled on the wall of a women’s jail in Dubai. That’s what a former inmate told her, and Rotaru does get a lot of calls from Dubai, including some from jail. But she gets calls from many odd places—as well as faxes, e-mails, and text messages—pretty much non-stop. “I never switch off my phone,” she said. “I cannot afford to, morally.” She looked at her battered cell phone, which has pale-gold paint peeling off it, and gave a small laugh.

Rotaru, who is twenty-six, works for the International Organization for Migration, a group connected to the United Nations, in Chisinau, Moldova. She is a repatriation specialist. Her main task is bringing lost Moldovans home. Nearly all her clients are victims of human trafficking, most of them women sold into prostitution abroad, and their stories pour across her desk in stark vignettes and muddled sagas of desperation, violence, betrayal, and sorrow.

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Chris Keeley

She has also seen women who worked as high-end prostitutes in the United Arab Emirates and returned


She has also seen women who worked as high-end prostitutes in the United Arab Emirates and returned to Moldova with savings. “They say, ‘I don’t need help. I can buy a place to live now.’ But, after a year or two, many of them come back to us, and say they have family problems, problems with their sexual relations. Each of them is marked by her experience.”

I asked about possible prosecutions.

“We never take information to the police,” Gorceag said. “We never ask for names or addresses. It’s frustrating, but such questions cause the women to close up. We will help with a prosecution, but a victim cannot be pushed to go to the police or the courts. I have no professional or moral right to do that.”

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