April 18th, 2008

Chris Keeley

D.C. Is Fourth in Nation in Incarcerating Residents, Report Says

D.C. Is Fourth in Nation in Incarcerating Residents, Report Says

By Robert E. Pierre
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, April 17, 2008; DZ04

 

The District has the fourth-highest incarceration rate in the nation, according to a report that says jails nationwide are bursting at the seams even though crime is nearly as low as it has been in 30 years.

The report by the Justice Policy Institute, a Washington-based group that focuses on what it considers an over-reliance on incarceration, said that people are more likely than ever to stay in city and county jails before trial. One reason is they can't afford bail. A significant portion of those in jail are homeless, addicted to drugs or mentally ill -- not hardened criminals, the report said.

Incarceration comes at a high cost. In 2004, local governments spent $19 billion to fund jails, compared with $8.7 billion on libraries and $28 billion on higher education, the report said.

In the District, 3,214 inmates are under city control at the D.C. jail and contract facilities. That is 553 people per 100,000 residents. Only Philadelphia and two Tennessee counties, Davidson and Shelby, lock up residents at a higher rate.

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Chris Keeley

Pentagon Report: Iraq War Is a “Major Debacle”

Pentagon Report: Iraq War Is a “Major Debacle”

Meanwhile, a new study by the Pentagon’s premier military educational institute has concluded the war in Iraq has become “a major debacle” and the outcome “is in doubt” despite the so-called surge. The opening line of the report says, “Measured in blood and treasure, the war in Iraq has achieved the status of a major war and a major debacle.” The study was released by the National Institute for Strategic Studies, a Pentagon research center.

Chris Keeley

Peter Hujar... Girl In My Hallway (1976, gelatin-silver print). From the exhibition Peter Hujar: Sec

Peter Hujar... Girl In My Hallway (1976, gelatin-silver print). From the exhibition Peter Hujar: Second Avenue at Matthew Marks Gallery in New York. "...Hujar’s home and studio was located at 189 Second Avenue at the corner of East 12th Street. He lived and worked there between 1970 and his death in 1987. Symbolically, the East Village loft represented for Hujar his movement away from the 'uptown' priorities of commercial photography—which he had been involved with since the early 1950s—and towards his own vision as an artist."

http://www.matthewmarks.com/index.php?n=2&c=7&e=452&l=&im=1

Girl in My Hallway
gelatin-silver print
14 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches