April 15th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Neocons' Role in 9/11

U.N. Official Calls for Study Of Neocons' Role in 9/11

By Eli Lake
April 10, 2008
WASHINGTON — A new U.N. Human Rights Council official assigned to monitor Israel is calling for an official commission to study the role neoconservatives may have played in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
On March 26, Richard Falk, Milbank professor of international law emeritus at Princeton University, was named by unanimous vote to a newly created position to report on human rights in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinian Arabs. While Mr. Falk's specialty is human rights and international law, since the attacks in 2001, he has devoted some of his time to challenging what he calls the "9-11 official version."
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Chris Keeley

Internet goes dark at Navajo reservation

Internet goes dark at Navajo reservation
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2008/04/14/ap4886994.html


Satellite provider OnSat recently shut off internet service to the Navajo nation, leaving the entire reservation without access vital to education, government, and other services. OnSat claims it did so because the federal government failed to pay about $2 million it owed, which OnSat in turn pays to a subcontractor for satellite time. Snip:

The Universal Service Administration Co., which administers the E-rate program, is withholding the funding because of a tribal audit that showed OnSat may have double-billed the tribe. The audit also raised questions about how the tribe requested bids for the Internet contract.

Tribal officials say it could be a couple of weeks before service is restored to chapter houses across the 27,000 square-mile reservation. They've been meeting with other Internet service providers to explore their options. Utah-based OnSat, meanwhile, has offered to reconnect the affected chapter houses, if they pay out of their own pockets.

Link to Forbes story. Related items: AP, Gallup Independent, Valleywag.

Image: "Navajo Girl," by Wolfgang Staudt

Chris Keeley

Alex Gross: Mysteries and Manners

 

Alex Gross: Mysteries and Manners

The Yogi Alex Gross... The Yogi (Collage, Acrylic and Oil on Antique Cabinet Cards, 6 x 4 inches). From the exhibition Alex Gross: Mysteries and Manners at Jonathan LeVine Gallery. "...Drawing from a vast range of artistic influences, Alex has a keen interest in and appreciation of foreign cultures and world history. His paintings often contain references to both vintage Japanese and Chinese advertising imagery, as well as contemporary American advertising. Other important influences include Gothic Flemish painting, early American lithography, and Victorian wedding photography. In Mysteries and Manners, Alex incorporates elements inspired by these diverse sources, as well as a comprehensive knowledge of art history, in exploring such themes as globalization, industrialization, consumerism, alienation, reconciliation, and mortality."
Chris Keeley

On Waking Dreams and Other Twilight Visions

On Waking Dreams and Other Twilight Visions
On Waking Dreams and Other Twilight Visions - photographs by Susan Burnstine at Soulcatcher Studio. "...Susan's love for photography began at the age of eight when her mother gave her a vintage camera to play with. She was instantly hooked. While working as a professional photographer, Susan started shooting and modifying inexpensive, plastic toy cameras for fun. Within less than a year, Susan's work was exhibited in galleries, magazines and contests. In Spring 2005, she started building her own homemade cameras and lenses, primarily made out of plastic, vintage camera parts and random household objects. Burnstine currently has around twenty homemade cameras that she uses to create these dreamlike, metaphoric images. Most have cost her less than forty dollars in parts and a few have cost nothing since they were created from random, found parts or parts of toys she 'acquired' from unsuspecting children." More at Susan Burnstine Photography.

http://www.susanburnstine.com/

http://www.soulcatcherstudio.com/exhibitions/burnstine/index.htm

Chris Keeley

War Tax Resistance: How a Portland Couple Have Refused to Pay Taxes for Over 30 Years to Protest Mil

War Tax Resistance: How a Portland Couple Have Refused to Pay Taxes for Over 30 Years to Protest Military Funding

Today is April 15th. Tax Day–a day when tens of millions of Americans scramble to file their income taxes on time. It’s also a day when people across the country are planning to protest the use of tax dollars to fund war. A recent study shows that more than 40 percent of every income tax dollar in 2007 went towards military spending. We speak with Pat and John Schwiebert, a Portland couple who have refused to pay their taxes for the past 30 years to protest military spending. Today is April 15th. Tax Day–a day when tens of millions of Americans scramble to file their income taxes on time. It’s also a day when people across the country are planning to protest the use of tax dollars to fund war. In dozens of communities across the country, demonstrations are planned at IRS offices, federal buildings, post offices and other public places to protest the continued funding of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

A recent study by the National Priorities Project shows that more than 40 percent of every income tax dollar in 2007 went towards military spending. The largest share of that was for the war in Iraq, which has been estimated to cost taxpayers $12 billion dollars per month. The total amount allocated for the Iraq war through fiscal year 2008 is more than $520 billion dollars.

To protest the continued funding of the war, some Americans are taking a stand today by personally refusing to fund the military. Tax resisters across the country are planning to withhold part or all of their taxes to protest the war.

Pat and John Schwiebert have been war tax resisters for the past thirty years. John is a retired pastor who spent more than four decades as a United Methodist minister. His wfie, Pat, is a registered nurse who has founded support groups for parents who have lost their children. They both join me here in Portland where they live.

Pat Schwiebert, war tax resister for over 30 years. She is a registered nurse and has started a group for parents who have lost their children. The Oregonian has described her as “one of the nation’s premier experts on grief and infant loss.”

John Schwiebert, war tax resister for over 30 years. He is recently retired after more than four decades as a United Methodist minister.

http://www.nwtrcc.org/

http://www.democracynow.org/2008/4/15/war_tax_resistance_how_a_portland

 
Chris Keeley

The Great Debate

I have eschewed coffee for some time now, as a regular beverage. I have maybe two cups a year, usually at a nice Italian restaurant with a fancy expresso machine with a fresh made cannoli.  I stopped using tobacco after I got clean, while in detox/rehab, and relapsed after about 3 years- reacting to a relationship difficulty.  I smoked and dipped and chewed for about a year and a half, until the ugliness of the habit overwhelmed me.  I couldn't run up three flights of stairs without being winded (I was a long distance runner in high school-letterman and all that) and got comatose during a particularly rousing sexual session.  The girl thought I had died, and freaked out as she had two johns die on her when she was working.  So I quit, and I have not gone back to smoking or tobacco use since.  It all comes down to how well I have worked the First Step, that is my observation, my experience. 
 
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Chris Keeley

Who Are We? Coming of Age on Antidepressants

April 15, 2008
Mind

Who Are We? Coming of Age on Antidepressants

“I’ve grown up on medication,” my patient Julie told me recently. “I don’t have a sense of who I really am without it.”

At 31, she had been on one antidepressant or another nearly continuously since she was 14. There was little question that she had very serious depression and had survived several suicide attempts. In fact, she credited the medication with saving her life.

But now she was raising an equally fundamental question: how the drugs might have affected her psychological development and core identity.

It was not an issue I had seriously considered before. Most of my patients, who are adults, developed their psychiatric problems after they had a pretty clear idea of who they were as individuals. During treatment, most of them could tell me whether they were back to their normal baseline.

Julie could certainly remember what depression felt like, but she could not recall feeling well except during her long treatment with antidepressant medications. And since she had not grown up before getting depressed, she could not gauge the hypothetical effects of antidepressants on her emotional and psychological development.

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Chris Keeley

AMY GOODMAN: Congressmember Schakowsky, do know how much military contractors like Blackwater cost?

AMY GOODMAN: Congressmember Schakowsky, do know how much military contractors like Blackwater cost?

REP. JAN SCHAKOWSKY: Well, we know that there are big winners in this war. And of course, an over-a-billion-dollar contract has been renewed with Blackwater. Imagine—just imagine anybody hiring a contractor who we know has killed seventeen innocent people. Now, there’s not been any results of the investigation, but don’t you think that most sane people would say, “No, I think we better figure out another way to provide this service”? It’s just mind-boggling, astonishing that Blackwater would get this contract renewed. But there are huge winners in this war: these companies that are making money hand-over-fist, these war profiteers that are delighting in the continuation of the war and the bilking of the American people. There’s horrible corruption and waste fraud and abuse that’s going on. And yet, Americans are asked to pay on and on and on. 

AMY GOODMAN: Today is April 15th, Tax Day, a day when tens of millions of Americans scramble to file their income taxes on time. It’s also a day when people across the country are planning to protest the use of tax dollars to fund war. In dozens of communities across the country, demonstrations are planned at IRS offices, federal buildings, post offices and other public places to protest the continued funding of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 

A recent study by the National Priorities Project shows more than 40 percent of every income tax dollar in 2007 went towards military spending. The largest share of that was for the war in Iraq, which has been estimated to cost taxpayers $12 billion per month. The total amount allocated for the Iraq war through fiscal year 2008 is more than $520 billion.

 

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Chris Keeley

Artist Phoebe Washer, RIP

Artist Phoebe Washer, RIP
 Artpage Fromabove  Artwork Phoebeportrait
Phoebe Washer, a young and highly talented San Francisco artist, tragically died on Saturday. The 20-year-old was hiking with a friend in the Marin Headlands when she fell off a cliff. We send our condolences to Pheobe's friends and family. She left us with a beautiful body of work. Link to Pheobe Washer's site, Link to SF Gate article (Thanks, Greg Long!)
Chris Keeley

The Candid Frame #40 - Dennis Keeley

The Candid Frame #40 - Dennis Keeley


Dennis Keeley is an photographer, artist and educator who is currently the chair of the photography & imaging department at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. His photographic work has included hundred of CD covers for jazz, hip-hop and rock performers. His fine art projects have been exhibited in numerous galleries and museums. He is the Western Regional Co Chair of the Society for Photographic Education. You can view his images by visiting his website.

Dennis Keeley recommends the work of Mark Klett.

http://thecandidframe.blogspot.com/2007/09/candid-frame-40-dennis-keeley.html

Chris Keeley

10 things you should know about John McCain (but probably don't): 1. John McCain voted agai

10 things you should know about John McCain (but probably don't):
     1.    
John McCain voted against establishing a national holiday in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Now he says his position has "evolved," yet he's continued to oppose key civil rights laws.1
     2.    
According to Bloomberg News, McCain is more hawkish than Bush on Iraq, Russia and China. Conservative columnist Pat Buchanan says McCain "will make Cheney look like Gandhi."2
     
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