April 4th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Keith Richards with Martin Scorsese in the concert documentary “Shine a Light.”

Keith Richards with Martin Scorsese in the concert documentary “Shine a Light.”
April 4, 2008

Only Rock ’N’ Roll, but They’re Still at It

Published: April 4, 2008

 

As you scrutinize the aging bodies of the Rolling Stones in Martin Scorsese’s rip-roaring concert documentary “Shine a Light,” there is ample evidence that rock ’n’ roll may hold the secret of eternal vitality, if not eternal beauty

Shine a Light

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, the quartet’s three skinny members, certainly look their ages. But there is nothing stodgy about them. The strenuous rock ’n’ roll life has left them sinewy and lean, like longtime marathon runners. (The staid, above-it-all drummer, Charlie Watts, is the exception.)

 

 

Mr. Jagger’s lined face, with its deflated balloon lips, suggests a double exposure of Dorian Gray and his infamous portrait, at once defiantly youthful and creepily gaunt. The simian Mr. Richards, whose upper arm flesh has shriveled, resembles an old madam chewing over her secrets. As he plays, his lips dangling a cigarette, he leans back into his snarling guitar and a joyful grin spreads across his face. He could be the world’s happiest young older man: Peter Pan as a wizened Gypsy fortuneteller.

 

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Chris Keeley

Ms. Sonnabend’s art trove, which includes seminal works by artists like Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, R

April 4, 2008
Inside Art

A Colossal Private Sale by the Heirs of a Dealer

In what experts described as the largest private sale of art ever, the heirs of the legendary dealer Ileana Sonnabend have parted with some $600 million worth of paintings and sculptures in two transactions to cover their estate taxes.

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Chris Keeley

Tan Bo” (2001) Mr. DOB is reincarnated in a kaleidoscope of color whose mixture of geometric and bio

Tan Bo” (2001) Mr. DOB is reincarnated in a kaleidoscope of color whose mixture of geometric and biomorphic forms is a kind of comic summation of modernist abstraction.



Photo: Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Comapany, courtesy of Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo


 it’s an ingenious key to the Pandora’s box of Mr. Murakami’s art and stuffed with questions of art and commerce, high and low, public brand and private expression, mass production and exquisite craft.

Chris Keeley

Correction: April 4, 2008

April 4, 2008
Editorial

There Were Orders to Follow

Correction Appended

You can often tell if someone understands how wrong their actions are by the lengths to which they go to rationalize them. It took 81 pages of twisted legal reasoning to justify President Bush's decision to ignore federal law and international treaties and authorize the abuse and torture of prisoners.

Eighty-one spine-crawling pages in a memo that might have been unearthed from the dusty archives of some authoritarian regime and has no place in the annals of the United States. It is must reading for anyone who still doubts whether the abuse of prisoners were rogue acts rather than calculated policy.

The March 14, 2003, memo was written by John C. Yoo, then a lawyer for the Justice Department. He earlier helped draft a memo that redefined torture to justify repugnant, clearly illegal acts against Al Qaeda and Taliban prisoners.

The purpose of the March 14 memo was equally insidious: to make sure that the policy makers who authorized those acts, or the subordinates who carried out the orders, were not convicted of any crime. The list of laws that Mr. Yoo's memo sought to circumvent is long: federal laws against assault, maiming, interstate stalking, war crimes and torture; international laws against torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment; and the Geneva Conventions.

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Chris Keeley

General William Odom's Senate Testimony on Iraq

TO: Distinguished Recipients
FM: John Whitbeck
 
Transmitted below is the transcript of the very frank and honest testimony on Iraq delivered to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee by Lt. Gen. (Ret.) William Odom.

 
General William Odom Tells Senate Rapid Withdrawal Is Only Solution

Testimony before Senate Commitee on Foreign Relations

William E. Odom (born June 23, 1932) is a retired U.S. Army 3-star general, and former Director of the National Security Agency under President Ronald Reagan

TESTIMONY BEFORE THE SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS COMMITTEE ON IRAQ
By William E. Odom, LT General, USA, Ret.
2 April 2008

Good morning Mr. Chairman and members of the committee. It is an honor to appear before you again. The last occasion was in January 2007, when the topic was the troop surge. Today you are asking if it has worked. Last year I rejected the claim that it was a new strategy. Rather, I said, it is a new tactic used to achieve the same old strategic aim, political stability. And I foresaw no serious prospects for success.

I see no reason to change my judgment now. The surge is prolonging instability, not creating the conditions for unity as the president claims.

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Chris Keeley

Photographs of the blooming of the cherry trees around the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C

Photographs of the blooming of the cherry trees around the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C

Photographs of the blooming of the cherry trees around the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C

4.4.2008


35  -  Photographs of the blooming of the cherry trees around the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C

http://tunlaw.org/chrry/index.html

All Photographs + Text Copyright 2008 Christopher Keeley