March 12th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Mixmaster Mike, a 37-year-old turntablist and resident DJ with the hip-hop group the Beastie Boys, h

Mixmaster Mike, a 37-year-old turntablist and resident DJ with the hip-hop group the Beastie Boys, has purchased a home in the Sunset Strip area for $990,000.

Mike, whose real name is Michael Schwartz, bought a Country French-style home with three bedrooms and 1 3/4 bathrooms in slightly more than 2,000 square feet. The house, built in 1930, has a wraparound porch, gardens and park-like grounds.

Hot Property: Mix Master Mike's new Sunset Strip home
Chris Keeley

Barden’s Boudoir (38-44 Stoke Newington Road, 44-207-249-9557; www.bardensbar.co.uk), among the new

Barden’s Boudoir (38-44 Stoke Newington Road, 44-207-249-9557; www.bardensbar.co.uk), among the new breed of venues, is easy to miss. Tucked between a one-pound discount store and a Turkish kebab joint, the bar is entered through a plain door and down a narrow flight of stairs. The catacomb-like space is illuminated by rotating disco balls and draws a colorful crowd. On a recent Friday night, a tall man in a red-striped tuxedo was dancing with a short woman wearing a leopard pillbox hat. Meanwhile, on the small stage, a five-piece Balkan band fused Romanian tunes to hip-hop beats — offering a fitting soundtrack for the culturally jumbled area.

A few minutes away, the only clue that the A10 Russian Bar (267 Kingsland Road, 44-780-942-5905) isn’t your regular vodka-and-pelmeni pub is the line of lithe scenesters outside on weekend nights. The basement club, which is decorated with old Soviet posters, is publicized mostly by word of mouth and MySpace.

The speakeasy vibe continues two doors down at the Melange Social Club (281 Kingsland Road, 44-789-635-0086; www.myspace.com/melangesocialclub). By day, the place seems willfully abandoned. But at night the candelabra-filled bar and sprawling basement come alive with film screenings, poetry readings and late-night D.J. sessions. Parties there rarely end before 8 a.m.

The young new arrivals are also infiltrating old Hackney institutions. At the Bethnal Green Workingmen’s Club (44-46 Pollard Row, 44-207-739-7170; www.workersplaytime.net), a 53-year-old social club for neighborhood laborers, wrinkled veterans now rub elbows with fresh-faced 20-somethings for long nights of beer and bingo. The musty, wood-paneled room upstairs also holds burlesque nights, dance parties and the occasional circus act. On a recent Saturday night, a D.J. played ’60s pop music, while a burlesque dancer in a beret and little else writhed on stage.

Evidence of Hackney reborn is popping up all over. In an abandoned building that used to house the struggling neighborhood paper The Hackney Gazette, an artist collective, Passing Clouds Works (440 Kingsland Road, 44-207-168-7146; www.passingclouds.org), now holds art workshops, film series, experimental theater and music concerts. Visitors are asked to call in advance. During a recent Sunday night jam session, nearly 25 musicians crowded into the space. A dreadlocked African man played the djembe, an African drum, accompanied by a tall, bearded Englishman on trumpet. And they were in perfect harmony.

Chris Keeley

JUHU THUKRAL: Last year, New York State passed anti-trafficking law, and it’s actually one of the to

JUHU THUKRAL: Last year, New York State passed anti-trafficking law, and it’s actually one of the toughest laws in the country. And Eliot Spitzer was very important in pushing the law through. We had been working on the law for the last couple of years. But there was a great deal of controversy around certain elements of the bill. And, for example, we opposed a provision that he pushed through—we and a numerous other advocates—which actually enhanced the penalties against clients of prostitutes.

And our perspective is, this is a trafficking law; let’s leave it focused on trafficking and on traffickers. And also, the more that you go after clients and customers of prostitutes, the less likely they are to actually come forward when you have knowledge, for example, of a woman that you’ve seen who’s in danger. We’ve actually had clients call us and refer women to us, so that we can help them protect their legal rights. And we’ve taken these women on as clients. So, really, it depends on what your goal is. Do you want to help people, and do you want to make sure that people feel comfortable coming forward when they have information?

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Chris Keeley

Lori Field

 Works by Lori Field at Kinz, Tillou + Feigen. "...Lori Field's encaustic paintings with collaged drawings portray hallucinatory visions derived from her flirtation with demonic realms, personal fairy tales, and the human world. The chimerical creatures that populate Field's mixed media works are at once familiar and mysterious. They are the realization of modern day myths that draw on a primitive lore. Her fanciful visual and cultural vocabulary is embellished with elements such as thread, lace, and insect wings - a mélange that inspires discovery and wonderment."

http://www.ktfgallery.com/current/?object_id=154

LORI FIELD detail image

Chris Keeley

The Mexican Suitcase

The Mexican Suitcase
Lost negatives by Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, and David Seymour "Chim"... The Mexican Suitcase by Trisha Ziff at Zone Zero. "...I returned from a short trip to New York in January 2007 with a project to find a Ben Tarver in Mexico City. He had inherited photographic negatives taken by Robert Capa during the Spanish Civil War. I was not the first person to be asked to help retrieve them, but for many reasons 12 years had passed since Ben Tarver had first reached out to Professor Green of Queens College an expert in the Spanish Civil War. It was a result of this brief correspondence initiated by Tarver that Cornell Capa became aware of the lost material of his brother."

http://www.zonezero.com/exposiciones/fotografos/ziff/
Chris Keeley

lurid, oft-repeated tales of a drunken Lennon’s being evicted from the Troubadour, a nightclub in Lo

lurid, oft-repeated tales of a drunken Lennon’s being evicted from the Troubadour, a nightclub in Los Angeles, seemed to support that image. 




March 12, 2008

A Fond Look at Lennon’s ‘Lost Weekend’

If there’s one thing that May Pang has been fighting for the last 28 years, it’s the idea that John Lennon was depressed, isolated and out of control during the 18 months she lived with him, from the summer of 1973 to early 1975, when he reconciled with his second wife, Yoko Ono.

Lennon himself fostered that notion by referring to the time as his “Lost Weekend” in interviews he gave in 1980, when he released “Double Fantasy,” a joint album with Ms. Ono that was his return to music-making after five years’ silence. And lurid, oft-repeated tales of a drunken Lennon’s being evicted from the Troubadour, a nightclub in Los Angeles, seemed to support that image.

But to Ms. Pang, now 57, the “Lost Weekend” was a remarkably productive time,

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Chris Keeley

Elk, elephant seal, baboon or chimpanzee, in a wide array of species, females eagerly mate with domi

One of the most important insights of modern evolutionary biology has been an enhanced understanding of male-female differences, deriving especially from the production of sperm versus eggs. Because sperm are produced in vast numbers, with little if any required parental follow-through, males of most species are aggressive sexual adventurers, inclined to engage in sex with multiple partners when they can. Males who succeed in doing so leave more descendants.

A story is told in New Zealand about the early 19th century visit of an Episcopal bishop to an isolated Maori village. As everyone was about to retire after an evening of high-spirited feasting and dancing, the village headman -- wanting to show sincere hospitality to his honored guest -- called out, "A woman for the bishop." Seeing a scowl of disapproval on the prelate's face, the host roared even louder, "Two women for the bishop!"

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Chris Keeley

Karl Hoecker en route to or returning from Solahütte. The women with Hoecker “were typists, telegrap

Karl Hoecker en route to or returning from Solahütte. The women with Hoecker “were typists, telegraph clerks, and secretaries in Auschwitz, and were called Helferinnen, which means ‘helpers,’” Wilkinson writes. “Their racial purity had been established—should an officer be looking for a girlfriend or a wife, the Helferinnen were intended to be a resource



http://www.newyorker.com/online/2008/03/17/slideshow_080317_wilkinson?slide=7#showHeader

 

A photograph of the selection ramp at Auschwitz, from the only other album known to show life at the camp. “Originally, [this album] included about two hundred photographs, made on May 26, 1944, depicting the arrival of a train of prisoners and their dispersal,” Wilkinson writes. “Often called the Lili Jacob album, for the young woman who found it, it is now at Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem.” The man with his back to the camera, holding a cane, is identified as Emmerich Hoecker. Records show that “there was a Georg Hoecker at Auschwitz and a Wilhelm Emmerich, but no Emmerich Hoecker,” writes Wilkinson. “Neither bears any resemblance to the man on the ramp, but Karl Hoecker does.”