March 3rd, 2008

Chris Keeley

Good Morning, Hamas

 Uri Avnery
1.3.08

            Good Morning, Hamas

WE ISRAELIS live in a world of ghosts and monsters. We do not conduct a war against living persons and real organizations, but against devils and demons which are out to destroy us. It is a war between the Sons of Light and the Sons of Darkness, between absolute good and absolute evil. That's how it looks to us, and that's how it looks to the other side, too.

Let's try to bring this war down from virtual spheres to the solid ground of reality. There can be no reasonable policy, nor even rational discussion, if we do not escape from the realm of horrors and nightmares.

After the Hamas victory in the Palestinian elections, Gush Shalom said that we must speak with them. Here are some of the questions that were showered on me from all sides:

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Chris Keeley

Disinformation - a weapon of covert action

Disinformation - a weapon of covert action
from Ray Close


Click Here: Check out "Meeting on Arms Data Reignites Iran Nuclear Debate - New York Times"

One would think, after the humiliation of the Curveball and Niger uranium fiascos of 2003 (to say nothing of the equally shameful Khartoum pharmaceutical plant incident back in 1998), that the CIA and the rest of the Washington intelligence community would have learned by now how to manage with a little more care and professional finesse the publication of sensitive intelligence on critical national security issues.

When I read this article in today's New York Time (see blue link above), I was immediately reminded of an event that occurred exactly five years ago, about which I wrote at that time:

CounterPunch
March 10, 2003  (i.e. five years ago)
A CIA Analyst on Forging Intelligence
Whose Deliberate Disinformation?

By RAY CLOSE

There was a small but very important passage in Mohammad Elbaradei's testimony on behalf of the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency before the UNSC last week that cries out for further investigation: "With regard to uranium acquisition, the I.A.E.A. has made progress in its investigation into reports that Iraq sought to buy uranium from Niger in recent years. This investigation was centered on documents provided by a number of states that pointed to an agreement between Niger and Iraq for the sale of uranium between 1999 and 2001.

"The
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Chris Keeley

The band coalesced in Los Angeles in 1990, when Stevens and Smith -- childhood pals from the same sm

The band coalesced in Los Angeles in 1990, when Stevens and Smith -- childhood pals from the same small town in Mississippi -- met Hoon while practicing in a garage. He strolled in with a mutual friend, after an AA meeting. 

admire Shannon Hoon. To Thorn and Smith's astonishment, he had a 10-inch portrait of the guy tattooed on his back. He showed it off during a smoke break on the patio soon after he first walked into the studio, a six-pack and a bag of weed in hand.

Tragedy Knocked Blind Melon Off the Rock Radar 12 Years Ago. But With a New Lead Singer, the Time May Be Ripe for a Comeback.

By David Segal
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, March 3, 2008; C01

 

YORK, Pa.

The idea seemed so crazy and potentially embarrassing that initially nobody would say it out loud. Guitarist Christopher Thorn thought of it first but kept it to himself for weeks, tossing it around in his head. Revive the band ? It seemed insane and at the same time, kind of thrilling. But insane. But kind of thrilling.

It had been 12 years since the remaining four members of Blind Melon had played Blind Melon songs, 12 years since the band's lead singer -- the charismatic, hard-partying and doomed Shannon Hoon -- overdosed on Oct. 21, 1995. The group was supposed to perform in New Orleans that night, but moments after Hoon's body was discovered on the tour bus, it was over. Everything but the royalty checks just disappeared.

Picture it: One day, you're big enough to move nearly 4 million units of a self-titled debut album, big enough to open for the Rolling Stones, big

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Chris Keeley

Grammy winner Amy Winehouse has finally found acceptance with people who know the importance of goin

Grammy winner Amy Winehouse has finally found acceptance with people who know the importance of going to rehab.

The troubled British singer appeared in concert at a Fendi party during Paris Fashion Week and reportedly brought the house down.

According to WWD, the beehive babe sang Friday night to a stylish crowd that included Jessica Alba, the Olsen twins, Kanye West, Rihanna, Claudia Schiffer, Sofia Coppola and designer Karl Lagerfeld.

“Forgive my ignorance, I don't know anything about fashion,” Winehouse demurred to the audience.

Who cares! They'll style you! And just ask Kate Moss about how nice these fashion folks are.

No sooner did the supermodel complete a brief stint in rehab than the Fashion Industry welcomed her back with open checkbooks.

She landed 14 major campaigns after completing her quickie 12-step program a few years ago. We're talking Burberry, Calvin Klein, Dior, Vuitton, etc.

So if Amy does decide to go to rehab, even briefly, she would no doubt be well-rewarded by designers and luxury goods companies with a flurry of fashion modeling gigs.

Hey, how about a new Chanel scent called Eau de Amy?

Yeah, that'd be a big seller.

Photo: WireImage

Chris Keeley

baron Conrad Black is in federal prison

11:16 AM CST, March 3, 2008

COLEMAN, Fla.

Former newspaper baron Conrad Black is in federal prison.

Federal Bureau of Prisons spokesman Mike Truman says Black reported Monday to a low-security prison near
Coleman, Florida.

He's serving a six-and-a-half-year sentence for engineering a major fraud on shareholders in his
Hollinger media empire.

Black and his co-defendants were convicted of fraud last July for allegedly siphoning money out of the company.

The prominent biographer and member of the British House of Lords also has been ordered to pay $6.1 million in restitution.

He had sought to stay free on bond on grounds there was a strong possibility his conviction would be reversed, but a Chicago federal appeals court denied his request last week.