February 28th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Drug addiction doesn't just affect the addict, it changes the whole family. Journalist David Sheff

Drug addiction doesn't just affect the addict, it changes the whole family. Journalist David Sheff and his son Nic join Fresh Air to talk about Nic's addiction to methamphetamine.

Both father and son have written memoirs about the experience. David Sheff's is Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Meth Addiction and Nic Sheff's is Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=25552288

 

Chris Keeley

Buddy Miles, the drummer in Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys and a hitmaker under his own name with the

Buddy Miles, the drummer in Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys and a hitmaker under his own name with the song “Them Changes,” died on at his home in Austin, Tex. He was 60.

February 28, 2008

Buddy Miles, Hendrix Drummer, Dies

Buddy Miles, the drummer in Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys and a hitmaker under his own name with the song “Them Changes,” died on at his home in Austin, Tex. He was 60.

Mr. Miles suffered from congestive heat failure, his publicist, Duane Lee, said, according to Reuters. Mr. Lee said he did not know the official cause of death.

Mr. Miles played with a brisk, assertive, deeply funky attack that made him an apt partner for Hendrix. With his luxuriant Afro and his American-flag shirts, he was a prime mover in the psychedelic blues-rock of the late 1960’s, not only with Hendrix but also as a founder, drummer and occasional lead singer for the Electric Flag. During the 1980’s, he was widely heard as the lead voice of the California Raisins in television commercials

George Allen Miles Jr., whose aunt nicknamed him after the big-band drummer Buddy Rich, was born in Omaha and began playing drums as a child. He was 12 years old when he joined his father’s jazz group, the Bebops. As a teenager he also worked with soul and rhythm-and-blues acts, among them the Ink Spots, the Delfonics and Wilson Pickett. By 1967, he had moved to Chicago, where he was a founding member of the Electric Flag.

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Chris Keeley

Radiohead Frontman Backs Emission Cuts in Europe

Radiohead Frontman Backs Emission Cuts in Europe

One of Britain’s most popular musicians is getting behind a Europe-wide campaign to force mandatory caps on emissions of carbon dioxide. Radiohead lead singer Thom Yorke says cutting emissions is a matter of global survival.

Thom Yorke: “We are the oldest economies in the carbon sense of the word and we have a moral responsibility, each and everyone of us, to not just do stuff on our own because that’s not good enough, we have a moral responsibility to turn around and change the way we live and the only way we’ll ever change the way we live is to get our governments to re-write laws gradually, make us change in a way that we can understand, in a way that we can cope with. If we don’t do it, that’s it.’’

The Friends of the Earth’s “Big Ask Europe” campaign seeks a 30% emissions cut by 2020 and a 90% cut by 2050.

Nationwide Vigils for Gay Teen Slain in Apparent Hate Crime

Back in the United States, candlelight vigils continue across the country for a gay teenager murdered in an apparent hate crime. Fourteen-year-old Lawrence King of Oxnord, California was declared brain-dead on February 13th, one day after a classmate shot him twice in the head during a morning class. The suspect, fourteen year-old Brandon David McInerney, has been charged with murder and a hate crime. Students at the school say King was often taunted over his sexuality. McInerney and other male students had apparently confronted him on other occasions. King was living in a shelter for abused and troubled children at the time of his murder. A memorial website has been established at rememberinglawrence.com.

Supreme Court Hears Arguments in Exxon Valdez Suit

The Supreme Court has heard arguments in ExxonMobil’s attempt to overturn a $2.5 billion punitive judgment for the 1989 Alaska oil spill. Exxon is seeking annulment of the damages, already halved from $5 billion by a lower court two years ago. Brian O’Neill is the lawyer for more than 32,000 Alaska residents seeking damages from Exxon.

Brian O’Neill: “Punitive damages are not only for deterrence. They are also for punishment. These guys have not been punished one bit. Even today, they think they have done nothing wrong. So, punishment is needed. If you hurt 32,000 people, you hurt the livelihoods of 32,000 people, you rip apart the economy of South-Central Alaska, then you ought to be punished severely. Hopefully, they will be punished."

Exxon has already paid more than $3 billion in penalties but the $2.5 billion would go towards residents’ long-term damage. Earlier this month Exxon reported a quarterly profit of $11.7 billion dollars—the highest ever for an American company. Justice Samuel Alito has recused himself from the hearings because he owns ExxonMobil stock.

Alaskan Tribe Sues 24 Companies for Village Erosion

Meanwhile Exxon has been hit with another lawsuit in Alaska. Native-American residents from the island village of Kivalina are suing Exxon and twenty-three other energy companies for the erosion of their village. In a lawsuit filed Tuesday in a US District Court, lawyers for the federally recognized tribe argued that the companies have contributed to global warming that is causing the village to flood and forcing residents to relocate.

Chris Keeley

The boy is Che Selkirk, given his provoking first name by his privileged, radical parents, members o

 

The boy is Che Selkirk, given his provoking first name by his privileged, radical parents, members of S.D.S., who have disappeared into the underground and are among America’s most wanted domestic terrorists. He is almost eight in 1972, when the novel opens, has never known his father, and has not seen his mother, Susan Selkirk, since he was two. The formidable Grandma Selkirk, who insists on calling him Jay, has been raising him, and has secured for her grandson the “Victorian” consolations of bourgeois comfort in Manhattan and a summer house in upstate New York, on Kenoza Lake: “It would always be summer, in his memory, the roadsides dense with goldenrod and the women from the village coming to steal the white hydrangeas just like their mothers stole before them. The geese would be heading up to Canada and the Boeings spinning their white contrails across the cold blue sky—loneliness and hope, expanding like paper flowers in water.” 

Carey and Kunzru share an interest in the sordid decay of radical purity.

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2008/03/03/080303crbo_books_wood

Everything changes when Anna Xenos, nicknamed Dial, turns up one day at Grandma Selkirk’s apartment, on East Sixty-second Street, to collect Che for a meeting with his mother. Dial was the boy’s nanny when he was a baby, and she and Susan were Radcliffe students together. Permitted to take the boy for an hour, she follows increasingly obscure commands from Susan and “the Movement,” and ends up first in Philadelphia and then in California. Che, having no visual memory of his mother, assumes that Dial is she, and a painful irony is set in motion. What Carey calls “the dark strength of the misunderstanding” will persist for more than half the book, because Dial does not have the courage to disenchant this “lovely little boy,” with his “perfect little boy legs, falling socks, banged-up shin and expensive sweater made from merino sheep, the face, the father’s face, dear Jesus

Chris Keeley

PHOTOGRAPH: ROBERT POLIDORI/“CORNER OF SPAIN AND ODIN, NEW ORLEANS, LA”(2008)

PHOTOGRAPH: ROBERT POLIDORI/“CORNER OF SPAIN AND ODIN, NEW ORLEANS, LA”(2008)



Louise said, “We observed a moment of silence today for the poor flood victims.” They were driving up Prytania, past the French consul’s residence, with the faded French flag out front and a big Citroën in the circular drive. Outside it was ninety-eight, but the A.C. was going in the car. Kids with their uniform shirttails out and carrying book satchels were walking along the sidewalk from another private school in the neighborhood. The dentist was close by.

“Did any of your classmates lose someone?” Walter asked.

“I suppose so,” Louise said. Louise was in the seventh grade and knew everything about everything now. “Ginny Baxter, who’s black and has a scholarship. She and I both opened our eyes at the same time and almost laughed. It was like everybody was praying, but they weren’t, of course. It wasn’t cool.”

“Did you remember your device?” Louise’s “device” was her night guard, which she was having adjusted at Dr. De Patria’s office. She’d begun grinding her teeth at night and sometimes in the daytime, when night guards weren’t thinkable. Dr. De Patria said this was a consequence of her parents’ divorcing when she was twelve years and two months old. To Walter the fact that his daughter ground her teeth seemed a small, bitter tragedy.

Chris Keeley

More Abu Ghraib torture photos

More Abu Ghraib torture photos -->
Wired has gotten hold of an incredibly disturbing set of photos from the US torture crimes at Abu Ghraib. Does anyone really believe that this was just a couple of rogue operators? If I wanted to reduce the number of jihadis in the world, I'd start by making sure that stuff like this didn't happen -- I can think of no better recruiting boost for Al Quaeda than prisons like Abu Ghraib.

As an expert witness in the defense of an Abu Ghraib guard who was court-martialed, psychologist Philip Zimbardo had access to many of the images of abuse that were taken by the guards themselves. For a presentation at the TED conference in Monterey, California, Zimbardo assembled some of these pictures into a short video. Wired.com obtained the video from Zimbardo's talk, and is publishing some of the stills from that video here. Many of the images are explicit and gruesome, depicting nudity, degradation, simulated sex acts and guards posing with decaying corpses. Viewer discretion is advised.
Link 

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/multimedia/2008/02/gallery_abu_ghraib?slide=1&slideView=5
Chris Keeley

Jeremy Scahill reports Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama will not “rule out” using priv

Jeremy Scahill reports Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama will not “rule out” using private military companies like Blackwater Worldwide in Iraq. Obama also has no plans to sign on to legislation that seeks to ban the use of these forces in US war zones by January 2009. Despite their antiwar rhetoric, both Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton have adopted the congressional Democratic position that would leave open the option of keeping tens of thousands of US troops in Iraq for many years

JUAN GONZALEZ: “A senior foreign policy adviser to leading Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama has told The Nation [magazine] that if elected Obama will not ‘rule out’ using private security companies like Blackwater Worldwide in Iraq.” That’s the lead sentence from a new article by independent journalist Jeremy Scahill. The adviser to Obama also said that the Illinois Senator does not plan to sign on to legislation that seeks to ban the use of these forces in US war zones by January 2009, when a new president will be sworn in.

AMY GOODMAN: Democracy Now! correspondent Jeremy Scahill joins us now in the firehouse studio, is author of the bestselling book Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army. His latest article in The Nation is called “Obama’s Mercenary Position.” It appears in this issue of The Nation.

Welcome to Democracy Now! So, what did you find out,

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Chris Keeley

Tara McPherson: Lost Constellations at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York. "...The painted portrait

Tara McPherson: Lost Constellations at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York. "...The painted portraits in Lost Constellations depict adventurous super-heroines from an alternate universe, crossing dimensional planes of time and space. McPherson considers the idea of parallel existence through the use of multiple views or angles on a subject, inspired by the Einstein cross (a phenomenon caused by gravitational lensing) while her series of bodily transfigurations convey principles on the physical manifestation of thought. A reoccurring cast of female characters appear in various states of action — fighting battles and growing toward self-discovery.


http://www.jonathanlevinegallery.com/?method=Exhibit.ExhibitDescription&ExhibitID=6DE9507F-115B-5562-AA8D725467169C25
Chris Keeley

The Gertrude Bass Warner Collection, 1903-1929 at the University of Oregon. "...The collection consi

The Gertrude Bass Warner Collection, 1903-1929 at the University of Oregon. "...The collection consists of approximately 5,500 lantern slides, many hand-tinted. Most of the images are presumed to have been taken by Mrs. Warner, or her husband and son, on their travels; some were purchased from commercial sources. Many of the images feature Shinto ceremonies

PH014_30-02

http://boundless.uoregon.edu/digcol/gh/Warner.html
Chris Keeley

Diane Arbus, Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mapplethorpe (whose portrait of Patti Smit

February 28, 2008
Arts, Briefly

Britain Acquires Major Modern Art Collection

A collection of 725 works of modern art valued at $250 million has been bought for Britain for $52 million and will tour the country under the ownership and management of the Tate and the National Galleries of Scotland, the museums said on Wednesday. Described as one of the most important holdings of postwar and contemporary international art in private hands, the collection, featuring names like Diane Arbus, Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mapplethorpe (whose portrait of Patti Smith is shown above), Gerhard Richter and Andy Warhol, was assembled over three decades by the art dealer Anthony d’Offay. Under the name “Artist Rooms,” reflecting the concept of devoting individual rooms to particular artists, the works will be seen at museums and galleries across Britain starting in spring 2009. The cost of acquisition, for a price described as Mr. d’Offay’s original cost, was met by the Scottish and British governments, the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund. Prime Minister Gordon Brown reacted to Mr. d’Offay’s contribution by saying, “Individual acts of generosity like this impact on the lives of millions, and reinforce the U.K.’s richly deserved reputation as having a range of world-leading museums and galleries.”

Chris Keeley

it counts among its customers art collectors from around the world, dozens of magazine writers and e

it counts among its customers art collectors from around the world, dozens of magazine writers and editors, a MoMA executive and many artists, including well-established ones like Brian Ulrich and Alec Soth. 

earning an innovator-of-the-year title from American Photo magazine.

February 28, 2008

Easing the Pain of Collecting

JEN BEKMAN’S apartment is hardly what you would expect from a woman who has made herself a force in the art world in the last five years, building a photography and fine arts Web site that draws international collectors and earning an innovator-of-the-year title from American Photo magazine.

Then again, her narrow studio in the East Village vividly reflects the many unusual twists in her life — a testament to a talent for reinvention.

There’s the storage closet in the middle of the apartment that replaced the loft-bed arrangement for two roommates who helped pay the rent in 1993, when Ms. Bekman, then 23 and a switchboard operator at the Paramount Hotel in Times Square, first moved in.

There’s the collection of midcentury Heywood-Wakefield furniture purchased in her late 20s, during her flush dot-com days in San Francisco.

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Chris Keeley

discover artists before their work hits galleries

discover artists before their work hits galleries

February 28, 2008

Where to Find Help (and Self-Help)

FOR those paralyzed by the fear of galleries and large expenditures, below are a few tips from art consultants and other experts.

Shop Online

TINYSHOWCASE.COM Offers a quirky selection of small, inexpensive art and letterpress prints.

LITTLEPAPERPLANES.COM Limited edition prints of contemporary drawings and paintings starting at $20.

GIANTROBOT.COM Eclectic art and prints from a store that specializes in Asian and Asian-American pop culture, from $5 to $1,000.

CEREALART.COM Multiple-edition sculptural objects by established artists like Kenny Scharf and Takashi Murakami, from $100 to $20,000.

20X200.COM Offers two new high quality prints a week in limited editions.

WHITECUBE.COM Limited editions by well-known figures like Damien Hirst and Sam Taylor-Wood from a major London gallery, starting at around $250.

Buy From Arts Organizations

BLINDSPOT.COM Limited-edition photographic prints, 11 by 14 inches and 16 by 20 inches, starting at $700

APERTURE.ORG Limited-edition photographs from $350 to $25,000 that you can browse by price, category or photographer.

PRINTSHOP.ORG Single pieces and complete installations by emerging artists from the Lower East Side Printshop, from $1,500 to $10,000.

WHITECOLUMNS.ORG Specially commissioned editions by emerging and established artists from $150 to $1,500; work can be viewed online and ordered by phone or e-mail.

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Chris Keeley

About 50 burly bikers fought back with tables and chairs -- pretty much anything that wasn't bolted

Dumb robbers stumble on biker meeting
On Wednesday night, two machete-wielding robbers, aged 20 and 16, attempted a heist at the Regents Park Sporting and Community Club in Sydney, Australia. Unfortunately for them, they picked the night that the tough Souther Cross Cruiser motorcycle club was having its monthly meeting. Apparently, the 50 bikers beat the hell out of them with tables, chairs, and fists. From CNN:
 Cnn 2008 World Asiapcf 02 28 Biker.Meeting Art.Cruiser.Club "These guys were absolutely dumb as bricks," Jerry Vancornewal, leader of the bikers, told CNN Thursday. "I can't believe they saw all the bikes parked up front and they were so stupid that they walked past in...."

One of the would-be robbers crashed through a plate-glass door and jumped off a balcony.

New South Wales police said they arrested the 20-year-old man a short distance away.

The second man made a break for it through the club's service entrance, but the bikers tackled him near a neighbor's fence.

"We just grabbed him, crash-tackled him to the ground, hogtied him with electrical wire and left him for the cops," Vancornewal said.
Link 
http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/02/28/biker.meeting/index.html?eref=rss_topstories
Chris Keeley

Ms. Jones painted trees on the walls of Rya's bedroom. She once bred pit bulls to sell to gang membe

Ms. Jones painted trees on the walls of Rya's bedroom. She once bred pit bulls to sell to gang members for $200 apiece; now she keeps two as pets, including Flue, left


Shoot, I’m happy,” said Ms. Jones, 33, a single mother who spent her youth as a foster child and gang member. She was dealing drugs on the streets of South Central Los Angeles before she hit puberty. “I’m making do. At least I’m not in three rooms anymore.” 

has just written a book, “Love and Consequences” (Riverhead Books), a heart-wrenching memoir that was released this week.

Ms. Jones is five feet tall in jeans, a pink camouflage hoodie, a toe ring and a fresh set of artificial fingernails. Besides being a consummate storyteller and analyst of inner city pathology, she is one of the few people who in the same conversation can talk about the joys of putting up her own jam (“I’m going to give you a couple of jars!”) and the painful business of getting a tattoo of a large, weeping pit bull across her back the day the state of Nevada set a close friend’s execution date. “It’s the most ghetto thing on my body,” she said.

Her memoir is an intimate, visceral portrait of the gangland drug trade of Los Angeles as seen through the life of one household: a stern but loving black grandmother working two jobs; her two grandsons who quit school and became Bloods at ages 12 and 13; her two granddaughters, both born addicted to crack cocaine; and the author, a mixed-race white and Native American foster child who at age 8 came to live with them in their mostly black community. She ended up following her foster brothers into the gang, and it was only when a high school teacher urged her to apply to college that Ms. Jones even began to consider her future.

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Chris Keeley

1 in 100 U.S. Adults Behind Bars, New Study Says

1 in 100 U.S. Adults Behind Bars, New Study Says

With 1.6 million people in prison, the incarceration rate is now the highest in American history, a new report says.

It cost an average of $23,876 to imprison someone in 2005, the most recent year for which data is available. But state spending varies widely, from $45,000 a year for each inmate in Rhode Island to just $13,000 in Louisiana.

Chris Keeley

The Fading Jihadists

The Fading Jihadists

By David Ignatius
Thursday, February 28, 2008; A17

 

Politicians who talk about the terrorism threat -- and it's already clear that this will be a polarizing issue in the 2008 campaign -- should be required to read a new book by a former CIA officer named Marc Sageman. It stands what you think you know about terrorism on its head and helps you see the topic in a different light.

Sageman has a résumé that would suit a postmodern John le Carré. He was a case officer running spies in Pakistan and then became a forensic psychiatrist. What distinguishes his new book, "Leaderless Jihad," is that it peels away the emotional, reflexive responses to terrorism that have grown up since Sept. 11, 2001, and looks instead at scientific data Sageman has collected on more than 500 Islamic terrorists -- to understand who they are, why they attack and how to stop them.

The heart of Sageman's message is that we have been scaring ourselves into exaggerating the terrorism threat -- and then by our unwise actions in Iraq making the problem worse. He attacks head-on the central thesis of the Bush administration, echoed increasingly by Republican presidential candidate John McCain, that, as McCain's Web site puts it, the United States is facing "a dangerous, relentless enemy in the War against Islamic Extremists" spawned by al-Qaeda.

The numbers say otherwise, Sageman insists. The first wave of al-Qaeda leaders, who joined Osama bin Laden in the 1980s, is down to a few dozen people on the run in the tribal areas of northwest Pakistan. The second wave of terrorists, who trained in al-Qaeda's camps in Afghanistan during the 1990s, has also been devastated, with about 100 hiding out on the Pakistani frontier. These people are genuinely dangerous, says Sageman, and they must be captured or killed. But they do not pose an existential threat to America, much less a "clash of civilizations."

It's the third wave of terrorism that is growing, but what is it? By Sageman's account, it's a leaderless hodgepodge of thousands of what he calls "terrorist wannabes." Unlike the first two waves, whose members were well educated and intensely religious, the new jihadists are a weird species of the Internet culture. Outraged by video images of Americans killing Muslims in Iraq, they gather in password-protected chat rooms and dare each other to take action. Like young people across time and religious boundaries, they are bored and looking for thrills.

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