February 7th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Event Invitation

Event Invitation



PLEASE NOTE: RSVPs for this briefing are only accepted by emailing : Feb12eventrsvp@gmail.com You will not be able to RSVP through ATFP.



Churches for Middle East Peace
Americans for Peace Now
Brit Tzedek v'Shalom
Israel Policy Forum
The Arab American Institute
American Task Force on Palestine
and
The Foundation for Middle East Peace


invite you to

Re-Calculating Annapolis:

Understanding the Crisis in Gaza and Southern Israel and Its Impact on the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

with:

A roundtable discussion with leading experts on Middle East affairs including perspectives on Israeli, Palestinian, Egyptian, US and UN policy.

Tuesday, February 12th
12:00-2:00pm

U.S. House of Representatives
Rayburn House Office Building Room 2200

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Chris Keeley

David Lynch's Guru and His Art

David Lynch's Guru and His Art

A lot of people adored Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the leader of the Transcendental Meditation Movement, who died yesterday. Maharishi was known as the giggling guru and he preached world peace and pure consciousness for every man.

Strangely, one of his biggest fans and followers was neo-noir film director David Lynch, who has authored films such as Blue Velvet and Lost Highway that explore something that seems more like subterranean consciousness. David runs a charity that aims to teach children TM and he has given many talks on the benefits of meditation.

I gave him a call at his production office here in Los Angeles and see what he was thinking about the day after the death of his guru.

Me: How are you David? How are you feeling?

David: I’m doing OK, Claire, it is a big day, was a big day yesterday.

Me: Do you feel sad?

David: I felt very sad, but also, very happy. Very happy that I knew Maharishi, that I got his meditation and very happy for the world that Maharishi brought out unbelievable cosmic knowledge and was able to bring enlightenment to the people and peace on earth. Now it is up to the people he left behind to follow through and put the pieces in place, Claire, and it’s going to be a beautiful world.

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Chris Keeley

theo kogan

theo kogan 

Lunachicks started in New York in 1987. Theo, Gina, Squid, Sindi and Theo's then-boyfriend Mike started rehearsing in Gina's Bedroom for about a year, before playing their first gig in 1988. In early 1989 drummer Becky Wreck (Susan Rebecca Lloyd) joined the Lunachicks. The band released their first full-length release "Babysitters On Acid" (Produced by Wharton Tiers) in 1990 on the English label Blast First. Two years later "Binge & Purge" was released on Safe House Records. In early 1993 Chip English replaced Becky Wreck.

The Lunachicks signed to Go Kart Records, releasing several albums through the label: "Jerk Of All Trades" (1995), "Pretty Ugly" (1997), "Drop Dead Live" (1998) and "Luxury Problem" (1999). The band also appeared in Potluck, a comedy released by the magazine High Times. Theo stars as Jade, the lead singer of a band who gets involved with a bereaved mobster, while the others take much smaller parts as members of her band, The Crazy Chicks. The band are shown rehearsing briefly, and playing at a "reefer rally" in New York, dressed in their customary outfits. Theo is also featured as the main figure on the DVD cover. The soundtrack features the songs 'Nowhere Fast', 'Luxury Problem', 'Less Teeth More Tits' and 'Spoiled Rotten'. They are credited as "The Luna Chicks" (sic).

During the Luxury Problem Tour, Chip English left the band and was replaced by Helen Destroy, who stayed with the band until they decided to take a break in 2000. The Lunachicks played two reunion shows (CBGB's 2002, Washington 2004) with Chip English on drums.

Life after the Lunachicks

Gina is now singer and guitar player for the band Bantam, Theo plays with Theo & the Skyscrapers. Theo has also works as a fashion model and as actress. She had minor roles in movies including Zoolander (tatooed woman in Hansel's Loft) and Tadpole (smoking woman at the bar). Becky was the drummer for the Blare Bitch Project in 2000. Helen Destroy plays drums in

http://www.myspace.com/theo




 

Chris Keeley

the Beatles, especially Lennon and Harrison, were still trying to tap into the cosmic subconscious,

the Beatles, especially Lennon and Harrison, were still trying to tap into the cosmic subconscious, or eternity, or whatever, by using LSD. The maharishi’s transcendental meditation techniques promised to get them there without the chemicals. They agreed to attend a retreat in Bangor, Wales, at the end of that August, and it was during the retreat that they learned that Brian Epstein, their manager, had died of a drug overdose. 



Meditation on the Man Who Saved the Beatles

“Maharishi — what have you done? You made a fool of everyone.”

That was the opening line of a sarcastic song about Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who died on Tuesday, that John Lennon wrote in 1968, not long after the Beatles abruptly left the maharishi’s ashram in Rishikesh, India, and declared themselves no longer his spiritual disciples. It wasn’t released that way. In the end the other Beatles, particularly George Harrison, argued that whatever disagreements they had with the maharishi, his work demanded respect, and it was unfair (and perhaps libelous) to be so blunt.

Lennon retreated, changing the song’s title, and the references to the maharishi in its lyrics, to “Sexy Sadie,” the form in which it can be heard on “The Beatles,” commonly called the White Album.

“Sexy Sadie,” for all its implicit anger, was part of a huge trove of songs Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison wrote during and just after their visit to Rishikesh. Whatever shortcomings the Beatles’ interaction with the maharishi may have had, the experience — which lasted only eight months, from August 1967 to April 1968 — seems to have opened a floodgate of creativity and got them out of what threatened to be a creative rut.

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Chris Keeley

Francis Bacon’s mysterious “Triptych 1974-77” this week at Christie’s auction house in London. Three

LONDON — A mysterious three-part painting that is viewed as a Francis Bacon masterpiece sold for $46.1 million Wednesday night at a Christie’s auction here, countering expectations of a record price for his work.

Triptych by Francis Bacon Is Sold for $46.1 Million

LONDON — A mysterious three-part painting that is viewed as a Francis Bacon masterpiece sold for $46.1 million Wednesday night at a Christie’s auction here, countering expectations of a record price for his work.

Three bidders competed for the work, the “Triptych 1974-77,” which was offered by a private collector at a sale of postwar and Impressionist art. The buyer was not identified, but people in the packed salesroom said the winning bid had been submitted by a young man with long hair who was carrying a leather jacket and spoke English.

The hammer price was slightly below the auction’s presale estimate of $50 million to $70 million for the painting as well as Bacon’s previous record. In May his “Study From Innocent X” (1962) was sold for a record $52.6 million at Sotheby’s in New York.

The final price for this towering triptych, including Christie’s commission, was $51.6 million, the auction house said.

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Chris Keeley

The Post. Weymouth's aunt is Tina Weymouth, the bassist in the new wave band, the Talking Heads, whi

Weymouth, 41, will also serve as the newspaper's publisher, the fifth member of the Graham newspaper dynasty to hold that title since her great-grandfather, Eugene Meyer, bought The Post at a bankruptcy sale in 1933. She is the niece of Post Co. Chairman Donald E. Graham and the daughter of Newsweek senior editor Lally Weymouth and architect Yann Weymouth. 

Katharine Weymouth

Weymouth joined The Post in 1996 and has been vice president of Post advertising since 2005. She has served as counsel for both The Post and its Web site in addition to holding other advertising jobs at the paper. She is a graduate of Harvard College and Stanford Law School and practiced at Williams & Connolly in Washington prior to coming to The Post. Weymouth's aunt is Tina Weymouth, the bassist in the new wave band, the Talking Heads, which featured David Byrne.


Chris Keeley

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 91, Dies

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 91, Dies

And the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi has died at the age of 91. He became famous in the 1960s after the Beatles traveled to his ashram in India to study transcendental meditation techniques.

John Hagelin, of the Maharishi University of Management: “Maharishi was extremely special in this world. He has left a huge legacy. He’s the one who brought meditation to the world. He is the one who encouraged scientific research on the effects of meditation fifty years ago which brought meditation out of the realm of mysticism and into the light of mainstream science, mainstream society.”

Chris Keeley

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who introduced transcendental meditation to the West and gained fame in the 1

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who introduced transcendental meditation to the West and gained fame in the 1960s as the spiritual guru to the Beatles, died Tuesday at his home and headquarters in Vlodrop, the Netherlands. He is believed to have been in his 90s. Steven Yellin, a spokesman for the organization, confirmed the Maharishi’s death but did not give a cause. 

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Spiritual Leader, Dies

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who introduced transcendental meditation to the West and gained fame in the 1960s as the spiritual guru to the Beatles, died Tuesday at his home and headquarters in Vlodrop, the Netherlands. He is believed to have been in his 90s. Steven Yellin, a spokesman for the organization, confirmed the Maharishi’s death but did not give a cause.

On Jan. 11, the Maharishi announced that his public work was finished and that he would use his remaining time to complete a long-running series of published commentaries on the Veda, the oldest sacred Hindu text.

The Maharishi was both an entrepreneur and a monk, a spiritual man who sought a world stage from which to espouse the joys of inner happiness. His critics called his organization a cult business enterprise. And in the press, in the 1960s and ’70s, he was often dismissed as a hippie mystic, the “Giggling Guru,” recognizable in the familiar image of him laughing, sitting cross-legged in a lotus position on a deerskin, wearing a white silk dhoti with a garland of flowers around his neck beneath an oily, scraggly beard.

In Hindi, “maha” means great, and “rishi” means seer. “Maharishi” is a title traditionally bestowed on Brahmins. Critics of the yogi say he presented himself with the name, which he was ineligible for because he was from a lower caste.

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Chris Keeley

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of the Transcendental Meditation movement, who taught the Beatles

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of the Transcendental Meditation movement, who taught the Beatles to meditate, made "mantra" a household word in the 1970s and built a multimillion-dollar empire on a promise of inner harmony and world peace, died Tuesday in Vlodrop, the Netherlands. He was believed to have been 91.
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
By the mid-1970s, TM had an estimated 600,000 practitioners, including actresses Shirley MacLaine and Mia Farrow; football star Joe Namath and pop singer Donovan. TM how-to books rose on bestseller lists, close behind the decade's iconic blockbuster, "The Joy of Sex."
The philosophy of life is this: Life is not a struggle, not a tension . . . . Life is bliss. It is eternal wisdom, eternal existence," the Maharishi once said.
Chris Keeley

Scarlett Johansson, Tom Ford, Keira Knightley, and Scarlett's

Scarlett Johansson, Tom Ford, Keira Knightley, and Scarlett's 

March 2006: Scarlett Johansson, Tom Ford, and Keira Knightley, photographed by Annie Leibovitz.
Jennifer Jason Leigh, Uma Thurman, Nicole Kidman, Patricia Arquette, Linda Fiorentino, Gwyneth Paltrow, Sarah Jessica Parker, Julianne Moore, Angela Bassett, and Sandra Bullock. 
April 1995: Jennifer Jason Leigh, Uma Thurman, Nicole Kidman, Patricia Arquette, Linda Fiorentino, Gwyneth Paltrow, Sarah Jessica Parker, Julianne Moore, Angela Bassett, and Sandra Bullock, photographed by Annie Leibovitz.
Joaquin Phoenix, Vince Vaughn, Natalie Portman, Djimon Hounsou, Cate Blanchett, Tobey Maguire, Claire Forlani, Gretchen Mol, Christina Ricci, Ed Furlong, and Rufus Sewell
April 1998: Joaquin Phoenix, Vince Vaughn, Natalie Portman, Djimon Hounsou, Cate Blanchett, Tobey Maguire, Claire Forlani, Gretchen Mol, Christina Ricci, Ed Furlong, and Rufus Sewell, photographed by Annie Leibovitz.
Chris Keeley

The Roman Vishniac Archive at the ICP. "...The Roman Vishniac Archive of more than 3,000 prints was

The Roman Vishniac Archive at the ICP. "...The Roman Vishniac Archive of more than 3,000 prints was loaned to ICP by the photographer's estate in 1992. This important archive features renowned images of the Jewish ghettos in Eastern Europe taken between 1936 and 1939, and comprises vintage gelatin silver prints, later gelatin silver prints, and albumen prints. Also represented in this collection are Vishniac's New York City studio portraits from the 1940s and microscopic images of cells, insects, and animals from the 1950s and 1960s."

http://www.icp.org/site/c.dnJGKJNsFqG/b.871875/k.A4BA/Roman_Vishniac.htm

Chris Keeley

MoFo

http://tunlaw.org/criskeeley2008.jpg

Hi Chris,
I went ahead and worked on one of the other photos we
made the other night.  I think I might like this one
even better.
We had a really nice time visiting with you guys.  It
would be fun to do it again sometime.
Eric

Paul Eric Sandstrom, Photographer
 POB 102 Gerrardstown, WV 25420



Photograph of Chris by - © 2008 Paul Eric Sandstrom, Photographer
Chris Keeley

I found this really cool article, I guess it's from 1985, about the role of 12-step recovery in Holl

I found this really cool article, I guess it's from 1985, about the role of 12-step recovery in Hollywood. 

http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19850728/COMMENTARY/498320721/1023


By Roger Ebert (1985)

The Parade article lists the many movies in which drinking and drug use are portrayed as glamorous and acceptable, and the small handful of anti-drug movies. The implication is that Hollywood is a pro-drug town.

These are stories from the New Hollywood:

The actress is 25 years old, the star of half a dozen major recent films. She sits down to brunch in a seaside Malibu restaurant and orders a Virgin Mary.

“And be sure it’s a virgin,” she tells the wait ress.

“You not drinking today?” asks her publicist.

“Today?” says the actress. “I've gone two years and three months, one day at a time.”

The conversation turns to her favorite AA meetings, in cluding one out in the San Fernando Valley that she likes because she doesn’t run into any movie industry people there. “In Beverly Hills, there are more stars at the AA meetings than at the Academy Awards,” she says.

* * *

The studio head is 52 years old, with the perfectly groomed Ivy League look of a Harvard MBA graduate. He is the only man in the restaurant on Melrose Avenue who is wearing a tie. He is talking about another studio’s recent major box-office bomb.

“I wouldn’t have touched that project with a 10-foot pole,” he says. “That was a cocaine movie and everybody knew it.”

“It wasn’t about cocaine,” protests a luncheon companion.

“Not about cocaine,” he says. “Made on cocaine. They always have the same problem. They have a lot of energy, but no organizing ability. So they sit there day after day, filming the same scenes over and over again.”

* * *

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