February 6th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Palestine ­ Time To Stop Pretending - Terrell E. Arnold

Palestine ­ Time To Stop Pretending - Terrell E. Arnold

All the major players concerned with the Israeli/Palestinian mess profess profusely that they want to engineer an effective resolution of that problem and to bring lasting peace to the region.  Terry Arnold in this penetrating 6¼-page examination details how they can bring off this very commendable result.  But some major changes in respective national postures have to come front-and-center immediately.
 
QUOTED EXCERPT:    Israel's long-term goal, as any honest observer knows full well, is to make life so intolerable for the Palestinians that they will leave. Then there will be no barrier to realization of a Jewish state. . . . Gaza has become the acid demonstration of what the outside world will tolerate. Only after Israel threatened to turn off all electric power   was there any real international resistance to their [Israel's] treatment of the people in Gaza. . . .  US and Israeli pressures have worked so far to make life miserable for the people in Gaza, but the people have not given up, and they have not rejected Hamas. . . . The solutions are not as obscure or difficult as the US and Israel pretend. Sensible people everywhere would like to find ways to transit dissident groups out of the volatile fringes into the mainstream. The first step toward that is inviting/enticing them into the political process. Granted, from the US and Israeli viewpoints, inviting Hamas into the 2006 Palestinian elections was unintentional. That election demonstrated the political skills of a group that already was moving out of terrorism. Since then, Hamas has shown more skills in governance than Fatah; it particularly has shown more capacity to serve its constituents than Fatah. That, indeed, is why Hamas won. This result should have been applauded, not ignored and suppressed. Over the past several months, Hamas has demonstrated the ability to govern, even with a shrinking pool of resources.   Given a little room, what it could do would probably please everyone except the Israeli hardliners who want any Palestinian governance to fail, particularly any Palestinian leadership that supports the real Palestinian interests. US support for Israel in this matter simply plays to that Israeli strategy.   In both Middle East policy and the War on Terrorism, the United States needs a new start. Both are in jeopardy because they consist of short-term tactical maneuvers that lack strategic design.   Policies in the Middle East must serve the real interests of all the players, not a preferred set. In fact, terrorism is a guaranteed product of present US bias. US policy toward Israel has sustained the largest terrorism generator in the region for decades. The present US role as post-Annapolis peacemaker will not alter that pattern, unless the US becomes the genuine honest broker that it never has been. US support of Israeli repression in Gaza only emphasizes that defect.  . . .  There is a practical refusal of Bush team leadership to concede that the Palestinians are people with genuine rights and interests, and that their insurgent attacks are attempts to gain US, Israeli and world attention. By dismissing those attacks as "terrorism" US officials choose not to look at reasons or think about talking to the Palestinians. Israeli fears are that Hamas actually articulates and will defend true Palestinian interests. That would mean genuine negotiations, not the prolonged standoff the Israelis have sustained up to now. Thus, the aim of both is to kill or confine the messenger.  . . . Stop trying to fight and win the war on terrorism in Gaza. The war is not there, but a million and a half miserable people are being pushed to do desperate things. . . . Replace the IDF as soon as possible with a neutral peacekeeping force.      END QUOTE
 
Regards,  John
Chris Keeley

by Rami G. Khouri Released: 6 Feb 2008

 Power and Authority Reconfigured"--2/6/08  
by Rami G. KhouriReleased: 6 Feb 2008

AMMAN -- The twin issues of the legitimacy and efficacy of power and authority are becoming more clear and urgent throughout the Arab world. This is the big ongoing story of our day, as a region of centrally controlled, mostly autocratic modern states evolves into a patchwork of different sources of power and authority. If we wish to address the problems of violence and instability in many Arab quarters, we must grapple with the issue of the legitimacy or power that remains one of the few enduring taboos in the region.

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Chris Keeley

Getty Museum Acquires Penn Photographs

Getty Museum Acquires Penn Photographs
By RANDY KENNEDY 3 minutes ago

On Wednesday the J. Paul Getty Museum announced that it had acquired Irving Penn’s “The Small Trades.” The series include 252 full-length portraits of workers.

J. Paul Getty Trust

"Deep Sea Diver," New York, 1951.

Getty Museum Acquires Penn Photographs
By RANDY KENNEDY

The subjects of the velvety black-and-white pictures are not exactly Irving Penn’s elegantly dressed, or undressed, regulars: a plump charwoman with her bucket and brush; a bespectacled seamstress draped with her measuring tape; a deep-sea diver disappearing into his monstrous helmet and suit.

But Mr. Penn considered these blue-collar portraits, called “The Small Trades,” some of the most important of his long and influential career. He began taking them in the summer of 1950 for Vogue, the magazine with which he has become synonymous, and now they have finally found a home together at a museum. On Wednesday the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles announced that it had acquired the entire series, 252 full-length portraits of workers — waiters, bakers, butchers, rag-and-bone men — that it called Mr. Penn’s most extensive body of work.

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Chris Keeley

He invokes the law of the street — finders keepers, losers weepers.

He invokes the law of the street — finders keepers, losers weepers.

 

A 1981 Andy Warhol was reported stolen in SoHo in 1998. A Brooklyn man recently took it to an auction house to sell it.

His luck has not been so good, though. After a death in the family about nine months ago, he said, he began abusing intravenous drugs and went into drug rehabilitation — hence the social worker.

February 6, 2008
A Warhol Surfaces and Is Headed for Court
By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS

Last September, a man who has admittedly lived a hard-knock life walked into Christie’s auction house with an Andy Warhol painting of a dollar sign and asked to have it put up for sale.

Though one can never judge by appearances, especially when it comes to art lovers, something about this particular art lover, Jason Beltrez, seemed a little bit off to the staff at Christie’s.

They accepted the painting but immediately contacted the Art Loss Register, the world’s largest private databank of lost and stolen art, to make sure it was legitimate.

“Bingo,” as Chris Marinello, director and general counsel of the register’s New York office put it Tuesday.

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