January 18th, 2008

Chris Keeley

Erratic in his behavior -- late to arrive for games and quick to complain about lighting, television

Erratic in his behavior -- late to arrive for games and quick to complain about lighting, television cameras and other annoyances -- Fischer, 29 at the time, stood as an iconic figure, a go-it-alone American battling the top product of the Soviet Union's Communist-party controlled chess bureaucracy

World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer Dies at 64

By Howard Schneider
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, January 18, 2008; 8:25 AM

 

Bobby Fischer, the chess genius who careened during his life from Cold War hero to eccentric international exile, died Thursday at his home in Iceland. He was 64.

Fischer's spokesman, Gardar Sverrisson, told wire services that the former world chess champion died at a Reykjavik hospital. No cause of death was given.

A solitary and combative figure, Fischer was born in Chicago, grew up in Brooklyn, and by age 15 had attained the rank of grandmaster. He thrilled Americans in 1972 when he dethroned Russian grandmaster and then-world champion Boris Spassky in a 24-game match held in the Icelandic capital.

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Chris Keeley

Do the math: Bush had taken 418 days of vacation in his first 6.7 years in office. That works out to

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/bushbeat/index.php

Do the math: Bush had taken 418 days of vacation in his first 6.7 years in office. That works out to 62.4 vacation days a year — a little more than 12 work weeks, which is probably slightly more vacation time than you get. On the other hand, think how much more damage Bush could have done if he hadn't taken so much vacation.

Anyway, multiply 62.4 days a year by eight and you get 499 total days of vacation.

Compare that with the 473 days of e-mail missing. All Bush's handlers have to do to keep pace is destroy 26 more days of e-mails. They can probably handle that. 

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/bushbeat/index.php

Chris Keeley

Pentagon Contract Awarded to Firm Employing Ex-Rumsfeld Aide

Pentagon Contract Awarded to Firm Employing Ex-Rumsfeld Aide

The Pentagon has awarded a multi-million dollar contract to the intelligence firm Missions Solutions Group just two months after the company hired a former aide to ex-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. The aide, Stephen Cambone, is a former undersecretary of defense for intelligence. Cambone established the Pentagon’s Counter-Intelligence Field Activity office—CIFA—the very same office that awarded his firm the contract. CIFA was previously involved in a Pentagon spy program that monitored the activities of peace activists.

Admin Defends Alaska Oil Exploration at Polar Bear Hearing

And in other news from Washington, the Bush administration’s stance on polar bears came under fire Thursday at a hearing on Capitol Hill. The administration has approved oil exploration in Alaska despite an ongoing dispute over whether the bears should be protected under the Endangered Species Act. Fish and Wildlife Service director Dale Hall said the White House believes the bears won’t be affected.

Dale Hall: “The service determined that these activities do not threaten polar bears throughout all or significant portion of their range after a review of factors including the mitigation measures, required under the marine mammal protection act, historical information on development activities, lack of direct quantifiable impacts to habitat from these activities noted to date, the localised nature of development activities or possible events such as oil spills.”

The bears’ arctic habitat has seen declining ice coverage by the year—a decline environmentalist blame on global warming. Congressmember Ed Markey criticized the White House stance.

Rep. Ed Markey: “In the end, man can adapt while the bear can not. We can act to prevent global warming, but the bear can not. We can develop alternatives to oil, the bear can not. When the ice is gone, man cheers about new commercial opportunities for oil and gas drilling while the bear starves and drowns. I have been hoping for common sense from the Department of the Interior and from [Interior] Secretary [Dirk] Kempthorne but I have heard that all too common abandonment of common sense here today.”

Chris Keeley

Foto: Modernity in Central Europe, 1918–1945

Foto: Modernity in Central Europe, 1918–1945



Jindřich Štyrský... Cover for Fantômas (The Dead Man Who Kills) (by Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre, 1929, Photolithograph of photomontage). From the exhibition Foto: Modernity in Central Europe, 1918–1945, February 9 - May 4, 2008 at the Milwaukee Art Museum. "...In the 1920s and 1930s, photography became an immense phenomenon across Austria, Czechoslovakia, Germany, Hungary, and Poland. It fired the imagination of hundreds of progressive artists, provided a creative outlet for thousands of devoted amateurs, and became a symbol of modernity for millions through its use in magazines, newspapers, advertising, and books. It was in interwar central Europe as well that an art history for all photography was first established. Foto: Modernity in Central Europe, 1918 – 1945 aims to recover the crucial role played by photography in this period, and in so doing to delineate a central European model of modernity."

http://mam.org/FOTO/index.htm
Chris Keeley

Keys to the Kingdom

Keys to the Kingdom

Between them, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg have made 13 of the 100 top-grossing movies of all time. Yet they struggled for more than a decade with the upcoming fourth installment of their billion-dollar Indiana Jones franchise, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Annie Leibovitz gets exclusive access to the set, while Lucas, Spielberg, and their star, Harrison Ford, tell Jim Windolf about the long standoff over the plot, why critics and fans will be upset, and how they’ve updated Indy. 

Cate Blanchett on the set of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

When we last saw him, nearly 19 years ago, everybody’s favorite archaeologist was literally riding off into the sunset after having found the Holy Grail. This seemed as though it had to be the end of the adventure series that had gotten its start with Raiders of the Lost Ark, the big summertime blockbuster of 1981. But then, on the morning of June 18, 2007, Steven Spielberg, the director of the Indiana Jones movies, and George Lucas, who came up with the idea for the franchise, found themselves facing cast and crew on an empty piece of land in Deming, New Mexico. “How time flies,” Spielberg said, raising a flute of champagne, in a moment captured on video, which ended up on YouTube. “No one’s changed, we all look the same. I just want to say: Break a leg, have a good shoot, do your best work, and here’s looking at you, kids.”

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Chris Keeley

At nine a.m. he is holding a can of Diet Coke. He looks like an undersize bear. When he starts talki

At nine a.m. he is holding a can of Diet Coke. He looks like an undersize bear. When he starts talking about Indiana Jones, a character he acknowledges is not dissimilar to Han Solo, his enthusiasm rises, breaking through his natural reserve. “It’s a classic movie archetype,” he says. “Clark Gable played that role forever, the same role, which is the freelance cynic who eventually comes around, whether he’s a newspaper reporter or a pirate. Humphrey Bogart would play it with a little bit more of an edge. Harrison plays that part really well and can play it with a certain amount of humor, which makes it really charming. And the idea originally for both Han Solo and Indiana Jones is he’s in over his head all the time and kind of treading water. In Solo, he’s got a lot more bravado and he’s actually better at what he does. He can actually handle it. Indiana Jones gets in over his head and he can’t handle it. It’s only by sheer, last-second skill, or luck, or whatever, that he actually gets himself out of it. You can’t create a character like that without knowing that someone like Harrison can have the right, befuddled, oh-my-God-I’m-gonna-die look. And you’re right there with him. He’s Everyman. He’s us. ‘That’s exactly what I would look like if I were in that situation.’ And it’s an honest look. It’s not contrived. A lot of those guys now try to copy that, the better-looking movie-star types who try to do it. In the end, Harrison is a movie star because he’s a character actor. He is like Clark Gable, who was also a character actor, and Humphrey Bogart, who was a character actor. Those people were not Adonis, superhero guys. But that’s why they’re so endearing. That’s why everybody loves them. That’s why they’re so much fun to watch on-screen, because they’re vulnerable.”
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Chris Keeley

exclusive footage from Annie Leibovitz's photo shoots on the set of

exclusive footage from Annie Leibovitz's photo shoots on the set of
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/video/2008/indianajones_video200802

exclusive footage from Annie Leibovitz's photo shoots on the set of
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/video/2008/indianajones_video200802
Chris Keeley

Washington, D.C. Travel Guide

Winter Day Out in Washington, D.C. 

Washington, D.C. Travel Guide

FOR a quintessentially D.C. start to a winter day, grab a power breakfast (the fruit platter with salmon is a good morning choice) among the wheelers and dealers at the Old Ebbitt Grill, just steps from the White House. A favorite hangout for Presidents Grant, Cleveland, Harding and Theodore Roosevelt, and now senators and lobbyists, the Grill, built in 1856, makes you feel like a true political insider and gives you a chance to test your C-Span skills by trying to identify fellow patrons.

When the flora and fauna there get boring, head a couple of blocks toward Garfield Circle to the United States Botanic Garden on the Capitol grounds and stroll through a truly delirious paradise of color and scent. Both soothing and stimulating, America’s garden is a great place to start the day gently and wait for the coffee to get the pistons going. A personal favorite: The exhibit on “Plants in Culture,” documenting botanical influences on the development of therapy, ornamentation, music, ceremony and language.

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Chris Keeley

The photographer Irving Penn

The photographer Irving Penn put Marcel Duchamp in a corner, exposed Colette’s forehead and swaddled Rudolf Nureyev’s lithe body in layers of winter clothing. His subjects, who included many of the greatest creative talents of the 20th century, emerged from their portrait sessions with their carefully shaped personas profoundly shaken.

The windows to the soul are firmly shut in some of the later portraits. 

Rock Groups,” taken in San Francisco during the 1967 Summer of Love, is an exception. On the left side of this group portrait is Big Brother and the Holding Company; on the right is the Grateful Dead. Everyone, even Janis Joplin, looks strangely neutral.

In “Passage” Mr. Penn wrote: “The hippies and the rock groups surprised me with their concentration. Their eyes remained riveted on the camera lens; I found them patient and gentle.” Where he expected confrontation, he found none.

Mr. Penn has been compared to Nadar, the 19th-century French photographer who made studio portraits of the Impressionists, although the comparison is superficial. He shares Nadar’s scope but not his sympathetic relationship to the sitter. Working primarily for Vogue, where he collaborated with the art director Alexander Liberman and competed with the photographer Richard Avedon, Mr. Penn developed a signature, confrontational style.
Chris Keeley

The makers of antidepressants like Prozac and Paxil never published the results of about a third of

The makers of antidepressants like Prozac and Paxil never published the results of about a third of the drug trials that they conducted to win government approval, misleading doctors and consumers about the drugs’ true effectiveness, a new analysis has found. 

January 17, 2008

Antidepressant Studies Unpublished

The makers of antidepressants like Prozac and Paxil never published the results of about a third of the drug trials that they conducted to win government approval, misleading doctors and consumers about the drugs’ true effectiveness, a new analysis has found.

In published trials, about 60 percent of people taking the drugs report significant relief from depression, compared with roughly 40 percent of those on placebo pills. But when the less positive, unpublished trials are included, the advantage shrinks: the drugs outperform placebos, but by a modest margin, concludes the new report, which appears Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Previous research had found a similar bias toward reporting positive results for a variety of medications; and many researchers have questioned the reported effectiveness of antidepressants. But the new analysis, reviewing data from 74 trials involving 12 drugs, is the most thorough to date. And it documents a large difference: while 94 percent of the positive studies found their way into print, just 14 percent of those with disappointing or uncertain results did.

The finding is likely to inflame a continuing debate about how drug trial data is reported. In 2004, after revelations that negative findings from antidepressant trials had not been published, a group of leading journals agreed to stop publishing clinical trials that were not registered in a public database. Trade groups representing the world’s largest drug makers announced that members’ companies would begin to release more data from trials more quickly, on their own database, clinicalstudyresults.org.

And last year, Congress passed legislation that expanded the type of trials and the depth of information that must be submitted to clinicaltrials.gov, a public database operated by the National Library of Medicine. The Food and Drug Administration’s Web site provides limited access to recent reviews of drug trials, but critics say it is very hard to navigate.

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Chris Keeley

Familiar comes first: Andy Warhol’s early 1960s ‘Race Riot,’ a silk-screened image of a black civil

Familiar comes first: Andy Warhol’s early 1960s ‘Race Riot,’ a silk-screened image of a black civil rights marcher attacked by police dogs. Warhol, our pop Proust, was a child of the archive; he lived in it and never left it. He culled his images straight from the public record — in this case Life magazine — and then made them public in a new way, as a new kind of art, the tabloid masterpiece, the cheesy sublime



Andy Warhol 

Floh: Baby Lotion, 2000" by Tacita Dean



Tacita Dean/ Marian Goodman Gallery

Other artists present randomness as the archive’s logic. The casual snapshots that make up Tacita Dean’s salon-style ‘Floh’ may look like a natural grouping. In fact they are all found pictures that the artist, acting as a curator, has sorted into a semblance of order."



Haji Qiamuddin holding a photograph of his brother, Asamuddin, 1997" from the series "The Victor Weeps: Afghanistan" by Fazal Sheikh

"Each of the four pictures in Fazal Sheikh’s ‘Victor Weeps: Afghanistan’ series (1997) is of a hand holding a passport-size photographic male portrait. Statements by the family members who hold the photos tell us that they are portraits of Afghan mujahedeen fighters who had died or disappeared during battles with occupying Russian forces in the 19

Fazal Sheikh and Pace/MacGill Gallery

Although the portraits are in each case held loosely, even tenderly, the words they evoke are passionate. These little pictures — routine, unexceptional, of a kind turned out in countless numbers — may be the only visual link between the dead and their survivors. Here the archival is profoundly personal. But do Mr. Sheikh’s beautiful pictures, or the photographs within them, represent some special, easily approached corner of the great archive that surrounds, shapes and even overwhelms us

Chris Keeley

Police: Victim Drunk During Tiger Attack

Police: Victim Drunk During Tiger Attack

The Associated Press
Friday, January 18, 2008; 2:46 AM

 

SAN FRANCISCO -- One of the three victims of San Francisco Zoo tiger attack was intoxicated and admitted to yelling and waving at the animal while standing atop the railing of the big cat enclosure, police said in court documents filed Thursday.

Paul Dhaliwal, 19, told the father of Carlos Sousa Jr., 17, who was killed, that the three yelled and waved at the tiger but insisted they never threw anything into its pen to provoke the cat, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle.

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Chris Keeley

Chess is war on a board," he once said. "The object is to crush the other man's mind

Chess is war on a board," he once said. "The object is to crush the other man's mind


As a champion, he used his eccentricities to unsettle opponents, but Fischer's reputation as a genius of chess was soon eclipsed, in the eyes of many, by his idiosyncrasies.


Fisher died of kidney failure Thursday in a Reykjavik hospital after a long illness, his spokesman, Gardar Sverrisson, said today

Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, president of the World Chess Federation, called Fischer "a phenomenon and an epoch in chess history, and an intellectual giant I would rank next to Newton and Einstein."

He spent nine months in custody before the dispute was resolved when Iceland granted him citizenship and he moved there with his longtime companion, the Japanese chess player Miyoko Watai. She survives him.

In his final years, Fischer railed against the chess establishment, alleging that the outcomes of many top-level chess matches were decided in advance.

Instead, he championed his concept of random chess, in which pieces are shuffled at the beginning of each match in a bid to reinvigorate the game.

"I don't play the old chess," he told reporters when he arrived in Iceland in 2005. "But obviously if I did, I would be the best."

Born March 9, 1943, Robert James Fischer was a child prodigy, playing competitively from age 8
Chris Keeley

http://easybakecoven.net/labels/drugs.html

{Tuesday, April 03, 2007}

PARADISE LIFE

A Stunning Memoir about Recovery from Addiction

Author Christopher Keeley offers hope for drug addicts to get clean, to start over, and have a wonderful life

Addiction to drugs is like a lover that you crave for, the more you give in to it, the harder it is to let go. This unhealthy obsession can cause horrible consequences, not only to yourself, but also to your family and the people you care about. Author andaward winning photographer Christopher Keeley shares how he quit this nasty habit through Paradise Life, a profound collection of personal stories and photographs that inspire a spirit of recovery.

link

As a recovering addict myself I find his book very interesting. His other web presence is also entertaining-- displaying art, activism, photographs, etc. Go have a look around.

Related:
From the Book
Daily Dreamtime
Intervention Organization
Secret Surrealistic Society


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