December 10th, 2007

Chris Keeley

More on the Iran NIE from The Guardian and Reuters

Intelligence Expert Who Rewrote Book on Iran
   By Ewen MacAskill
   The Guardian UK

   Saturday 08 December 2007

Report has torpedoed plans for military action and brought "howls" from
neocons.
   The intelligence came from an exotic variety of sources: there was
the so-called Laptop of Death; there was the Iranian commander who
mysteriously disappeared in Turkey. Also in the mix was video footage of
a nuclear plant in central Iran and intercepts of Iranian telephone
calls by the British listening station GCHQ.

   But pivotal to the US investigation into Iran's suspect nuclear
weapons programme was the work of a little-known intelligence
specialist, Thomas Fingar. He was the principal author of an
intelligence report published on Monday that concluded Iran, contrary to
previous US claims, had halted its covert programme four years ago and
had not restarted it. Almost single-handedly he has stopped - or, at the
very least, postponed - any US military action against Iran.

   
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Chris Keeley

The Supreme Court on Monday said judges may impose shorter prison terms for crack cocaine crimes, en

The Supreme Court on Monday said judges may impose shorter prison terms for crack cocaine crimes, enhancing judicial discretion to reduce the disparity between sentences for crack and cocaine powder.

Court: Judges Can Reduce Crack Sentences

By MARK SHERMAN
The Associated Press
Monday, December 10, 2007; 11:07 AM

 

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday said judges may impose shorter prison terms for crack cocaine crimes, enhancing judicial discretion to reduce the disparity between sentences for crack and cocaine powder.

By a 7-2 vote, the court said that a 15-year sentence given to Derrick Kimbrough, a black veteran of the 1991 war with Iraq, was acceptable, even though federal sentencing guidelines called for Kimbrough to receive 19 to 22 years.

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Chris Keeley

Giuliani Time!”: The Rudy Quiz

Giuliani Time!”: The Rudy Quiz

by Paul Slansky December 17, 2007

Who said what about Rudolph Giuliani?

1. Schools chancellor Rudy Crew.

2. Columnist Jimmy Breslin.

3. Police Commissioner William Bratton.

4. His son, Andrew.

5. Former Mayor Ed Koch.

6. Al Sharpton.

(a) “His goal in life is to spear people, destroy them, to go for the jugular.”

(b) “It’s like a cult he’s got there. You can’t work with the guy unless you’re willing to drink the Kool-Aid.”

(c) “There’s obviously a little problem that exists between me and his wife.”

(d) “He is not bound by the truth. I have studied animal life, and their predator/prey relations are more graceful than his.”

(e) “[He] didn’t bring us together, our pain brought us together. . . . We would have come together if Bozo was the mayor.”

(f ) “He is a small man in search of a balcony.”

 

7. True or false: When Giuliani blamed an underling named Jerome M. Hauer for the foolhardy idea of placing the city’s emergency-management headquarters in the World Trade Center, he was confronted with a memo in which Hauer had argued against the site and in favor of a less visible target in Brooklyn.

 

Which Giuliani appointee did what?

8. Housing Development Corporation head Russell Harding.

9. Housing Commissioner Richard Roberts.

10. Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik.

(a) Pleaded guilty to perjury.

(b) Was found guilty of embezzlement and possession of child pornography.

(c) Was indicted on sixteen charges, including corruption, mail fraud, and tax fraud.

 

11. Who is Leo D’Avanzo?

(a) The Grammy Awards official whose refusal to let Giuliani read a list of nominees at a press conference caused such tension that the organization decided to move its next ceremony to Los Angeles, costing New York forty million dollars in revenue.

(b) The Mob-connected uncle who employed Giuliani’s father as a bat-wielding debt collector.

(c) The artist whose painting of a black Virgin Mary surrounded by images of female genitalia and elephant dung caused Giuliani to threaten to shut down the Brooklyn Museum exhibition in which it hung, calling it “sick stuff.”

(d) One of the cops who fired nineteen bullets into the unarmed Guinean immigrant Amadou Diallo.

 

12. What action by the Giuliani administration was found by the courts to have violated the First Amendment rights of New Yorkers?

(a) Preventing taxi-drivers from assembling for a protest.

(b) Requiring city workers to obtain permission to speak to the press.

(c) Refusing to issue a permit for an anti-police-brutality march.

(d) All of the above, and many more.

 

13. What prompted a legal skirmish between New York magazine and the city during Giuliani’s mayoralty?

(a) A bus ad touting the magazine as “possibly the only good thing in New York Rudy hasn’t taken credit for.”

(b) A cover story pointing out how odd it was that he was married to his first wife for fourteen years before finding out that she was not his third cousin but, rather, his second cousin—a confusion that occurred, he explained, “because I never calculated the lines of consanguinity.”

(c) A photo spread of his comb-overs that described him as “thin-haired and even thinner-skinned.”

(d) A column mocking his vendettas against hot-dog venders, jaywalkers, turnstile-jumpers, and squeegee men.

 

14. True or false: When Hillary Clinton announced her Senate run, Giuliani attacked her for including, on the preceremony soundtrack, the Billy Joel song “Captain Jack,” which the Mayor claimed encouraged masturbation and put out the message “Let’s say yes to drugs.”

 

Which Judith did what?

15. Judith Regan.

16. Judith Nathan.

(a) Carried on an affair with a top city official at a house in Southampton.

(b) Carried on an affair with a top city official in an apartment near Ground Zero donated for the use of relief workers.

 

17. Who is Justin Volpe?

(a) The priest recently hired by Giuliani’s consulting firm despite having been accused of molesting young boys.

(b) The police officer who sodomized the Haitian immigrant Abner Louima with a broomstick in a Brooklyn station house.

(c) The live-in partner of the gay friend whom Giuliani moved in with after his wife Donna Hanover, having learned of his intention to divorce her when he announced it at a press conference, refused to leave Gracie Mansion.

(d) The man standing between Giuliani and Alfonse D’Amato in a picture of them, dressed as hoodlums, from a photo-op drug bust in 1986.

 

18. Who is Elliot Cuker?

(a) The ex-husband of Giuliani’s third wife, who said that she called him Rich Little Kike and Jew Boy.

(b) One of the first indicted Wall Street traders subjected to Giuliani’s “perp walk” technique.

(c) The adviser who first got Giuliani to appear in drag in public.

(d) The official to whom Giuliani claimed to have said, on the morning of September 11, 2001, “Thank God George Bush is our President.”



Answers:


(1) d, (2) f, (3) b, (4) c, (5) a, (6) e, (7) True, (8) b, (9) a, (10) c, (11) b, (12) d, (13) a, (14) True, (15) b, (16) a, (17) b, (18) c.


Chris Keeley

U.S. Defends Israel’s Right to Nuclear Weapons

U.S. Defends Israel’s Right to Nuclear Weapons

The United States was accused this weekend of being hypocritical for supporting Israel’s right to have nuclear weapons while trying to force Iran to stop uranium enrichment. During a conference in the Gulf nation of Bahrain, the Bahraini Labor Minister Majeed al-Alawi questioned Defense Secretary Robert Gates about Israel.
bq. Majeed al-Alawi: “Secretary of Defense thank you very much for the excellent speech. I was wondering whether you think the Israeli nuclear weapon is a threat to regional security or not?”

Robert Gates: “No, I do not.”

The statement by Gates was greeted by laughter from a room filled with government officials from Middle Eastern countries. Gates said there are significant differences in terms of both the
history and the behavior of the Iranian and Israeli governments.

Robert Gates: “I think that Israel is not training terrorists to subvert its neighbors. It has not shipped weapons into a place like Iraq to kill thousands of innocent civilians covertly. It has not threatened to destroy any of its neighbors. It is not trying to destabilize the government of Lebanon.”

Hearing Held For AP Photographer Jailed by U.S. in Iraq

In other Iraq news, a criminal hearing was held on Sunday in Baghdad in the case of imprisoned Associated Press photographer Bilal Hussein, who has been held by the U.S. military without charge for nearly 20 months The hearing marked the first time that Hussein or his attorneys have seen any evidence in the case. No formal charges have been lodged yet against Hussein who was part of a team of AP photographers who won a Pulitzer Prize. Last week the Committee to Protect Journalists said Hussein is one of at least 127 journalists behind bars worldwide. China is currently jailing 29 journalists – more than any other country. The United States is jailing two journalists without charge – Bilal Hussein in Iraq and Al-Jazeera cameraman Sami al-Haj, who has been held at Guantanamo Bay for the past five years.

Chris Keeley

What is Blackwater’s Role in the 2008 Presidential Race?

What is Blackwater’s Role in the 2008 Presidential Race?

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney cited Cofer Black, the former head of Counterterrorism at the CIA, as his advisor on issues involving prisoner interrogation during a recent presidential debate. Black is now the vice chairman on private military firm, Blackwater. We speak with Jeremy Scahill, author of “Blackwater: the Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army” about Romney and Black as well as State Department Inspector General Howard Krongard and his brother’s ties to the company.

We turn to the latest in the unfolding controversy surrounding the private military firm Blackwater. On Friday the State Department”s top investigator was forced to resign following the disclosure his brother sat on Blackwater’s advisory board. Inspector General Howard Krongard had initially denied his brother”s ties to the company. Current and former State Department officials have previously accused Krongard of thwarting probes into contracting waste and crimes in Iraq—including alleged arms smuggling by Blackwater guards.

Meanwhile, after initially indicating it would let Blackwater’s contract expire in May, State Department officials are now raising the likelihood of a renewal. The acting head of U.S. diplomatic security, Gregory Starr, has reportedly told Blackwater it will be judged on its actions “from here on out.” That would preclude from consideration the September shooting deaths of seventeen Iraqi civilians by Blackwater guards in Baghdad.

In his latest piece for the Nation Magazine, independent journalist and Democracy Now correspondent Jeremy Scahill writes that Blackwater isn”t taking any chances on keeping its lucrative deals. Scahill says Blackwater has launched a major rebranding campaign aimed at winning new government contracts far beyond Iraq. And it”s also playing a role in the presidential race, establishing deep ties to Republican hopeful Mitt Romney.

Jeremy Scahill joins us in the firehouse studio. He is the author of the best-selling book “Blackwater: The Rise of the World”s Most Powerful Mercenary Army.”

We also speak with Scott Horton, New York attorney specializing in international law and human rights.

Jeremy Scahill, independent journalist, Democracy Now correspondent, author of “Blackwater: the Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army.”

Scott Horton, New York attorney specializing in international law and human rights. He is a contributor to Harper"s Magazine where he writes the blog No Comment. He served as chair of the International Law Committee at the New York Bar Association.

Chris Keeley

But even for those of us in religions that were once considered cults by other religions — my mom an

But even for those of us in religions that were once considered cults by other religions — my mom and another Catholic girlfriend actually had Southern Protestants ask them to lift up their hair so they could see the mark of the devil or the horns — Mormonism is opaque. 

December 9, 2007
Op-Ed Columnist

Mitt’s No J.F.K.

WASHINGTON

When I was a kid, we used to drive on the Beltway past the big Mormon temple outside Washington. The spires rose up like a white Oz, and some wag had spray-painted the message on a bridge beneath: “Surrender Dorothy!”

It did seem like an alien world, an impression that was enhanced when we took a tour of the temple and saw all the women wearing white outfits and light pink lipstick.

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Chris Keeley

''By dropping his appeal, Mr. Libby has finally abandoned the pretense that his conviction was a mis

By dropping his appeal, Mr. Libby has finally abandoned the pretense that his conviction was a miscarriage of justice,'' Wilson said in a statement Monday

December 10, 2007

Libby to Drop Appeal in Leak Case

Filed at 2:10 p.m. ET

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Former White House aide I. Lewis ''Scooter'' Libby is no longer appealing his conviction in the CIA leak case, a tacit recognition that continuing his legal fight might only make things worse.

Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, was convicted of perjury and obstruction but President Bush commuted his 30-month prison sentence in July. As a convicted felon, Libby will lose his law license and, in some states, cannot vote.

He might have had a chance to avoid those consequences had he won on appeal, but at a new trial his commutation would be meaningless and Libby would again face potential prison time.

''We remain firmly convinced of Mr. Libby's innocence,'' attorney Theodore Wells said Monday. ''However, the realities were, that after five years of government service by Mr. Libby and several years of defending against this case, the burden on Mr. Libby and his young family of continuing to pursue his complete vindication are too great to ask them to bear.''

Libby, 57, was convicted of lying and obstructing an investigation into the 2003 leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity. He was the only person to face criminal charges in the case.

After Bush's commutation, Libby paid a $250,000 fine and remained on two years probation. There was no guarantee Libby would do any better if he persuaded an appeals court to grant a new trial. In fact, by the time that new trial was over, Bush would likely be out of office and the result of that trial would almost certainly stick.

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Chris Keeley

Black, 63, a Canadian-born member of the British House of Lords renowned for his lavish lifestyle an

Black, 63, a Canadian-born member of the British House of Lords renowned for his lavish lifestyle and flamboyant way with words, had faced up to slightly more than 8 years in prison under sentencing guidelines determined earlier Monday by U.S. District Judge Amy J. St. Eve. 



December 10, 2007

Conrad Black Sentenced to 6 and 1/2 Years in Prison

Filed at 2:06 p.m. ET

CHICAGO (AP) -- Former newspaper mogul Conrad Black was sentenced Monday to 6.5 years in prison for swindling shareholders in his Hollinger International media empire out of millions of dollars.

Black, 63, a Canadian-born member of the British House of Lords renowned for his lavish lifestyle and flamboyant way with words, had faced up to slightly more than 8 years in prison under sentencing guidelines determined earlier Monday by U.S. District Judge Amy J. St. Eve.

Federal prosecutors previously asked St. Eve, who presided over Black's four-month trial earlier this year, to sentence the silver-haired press lord to federal prison for as long as 24 years.

Chris Keeley

Ill-conceived sanctions

TO: Distinguished Recipients
FM: John Whitbeck

Transmitted below is a brief letter of mine which has been published in
today's INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.

Everyone now recognizes that "weapons of mass destruction" were simply
an *excuse*, not the *reason*, for America's desperate determination to
attack and destroy Iraq. Is Iran really any different?

*Ill-conceived sanctions*

*Monday, December 10, 2007 *

http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/12/09/opinion/edlet.php

* *
----------------------------------

*Ill-conceived sanctions*



One must wonder what thought processes (if any) could have produced
unanimous NATO support for a third round of enhanced UN sanctions
against Iran.



Without the argument that Iran was pursuing a nuclear weapons program,
it is inconceivable that the UN Security Council would have adopted the
first two rounds of sanctions. That specious argument has now been blown
away by the unanimous judgment of America's own intelligence agencies.



In a sane world, the only issue now would be the prompt revocation of
the existing, ill-conceived sanctions.



John V. Whitbeck /Jidda, Saudi Arabia/
Chris Keeley

Akiva Eldar on Har Homa

The Har Homa test*

_By Akiva Eldar <mailto:eldar@haaretz.co.il>

It is difficult to think of a place more suitable than Har Homa for
holding the first test in the spirit of Annapolis. The comparison
between Har Homa Crisis No. 2 and the development of Har Homa Crisis No.
1 can teach us whether the Israeli-Palestinian peace process has indeed
started a new track or whether all the players are stuck on the old line.

Does Ehud Olmert, who pressed for the establishment of the new
neighborhood in East Jerusalem, really see something different from the
Prime Minister's Bureau than what he saw from the office of the mayor of
Jerusalem? Will President George W. Bush pay lip service and eventually
have to eat his words, just as Bill Clinton did 10 years ago?

Meanwhile, it is difficult to find the differences. Har Homa Crisis No.
1 also broke out a short while after an American attempt to revive the
peace process. In February, 1997, a few weeks after it signed the Hebron
agreement, the Netanyahu government decided to erect 6,500 housing units
on the southern border of East Jerusalem, about one-third of them on
private land owned by Palestinians. In the Palestinian Authority (and
the Israeli peace camp) this plan was seen as another step in a scheme
to cut off their capital from the West Bank. Yasser Arafat threatened to
declare the establishment of an independent state and the Palestinian
Legislative Council announced a general strike in the territories.

T
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Chris Keeley

Strong Words from Susan Abualhawa re Palestine

You need to read this whether or not you will like what you read. Sorry
to impose it on you, but it is necessary.

----- Original Message -----
*From:* World View <mailto:ummyakoub@yahoo.com>
*To:* wvns@yahoogroups.com <mailto:wvns@yahoogroups.com>
*Sent:* Saturday, December 08, 2007 11:43 AM
*Subject:* [wvns] Of Arabs at Annapolis

How is it possible that Arab men who command the greatest natural
resource ever known to man manage to be utterly powerless to stop the
wholesale robbery and rape of Palestine or Iraq?

Of Arabs at Annapolis
by Susan Abualhawa
Friday, 07 December 2007 19:28
http://palestinechronicle.com/story-12070733329.htm
<http://palestinechronicle.com/story-12070733329.htm>

Annapolis was hoopla, smoke and mirrors, much ado about nothing, a
hoe-down of politically bankrupt men trying to garner popularity among
their respective constituencies.

It seems that George Bush and Ehud Olmert have figured out how to join
the ranks of those who exploit the Palestinian tragedy and suffering
to further their political ends without actually doing anything to
alleviate that tragedy. For all the ruckus, speeches, leaders and
dignitaries, what came out of Annapolis was yet another meaningless
statement, this time (drum roll, please) Israelis and Palestinians
agreed to agree on something by 2008.

And yet...I wish the absurdity of it were truly so benign as a
hullabaloo. If you were paying attention, you'd have heard the menace
of ethnic cleansing and seen the malignancy of cowardice.

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Chris Keeley

.2 million downloaded the record in the first two days, earning the band somewhere between $1 millio

December 9, 2007
Radiohead Payment Model, The
By WM. FERGUSON

It could be a Zen koan, or a fragment of a Fifth Dimension lyric: The value of music is what the listener will pay. But as of Oct. 10, it became a viable business model. That was the day Radiohead made its seventh studio album, “In Rainbows,” available for download online. Customers were invited to pay whatever they wished. Clicking on the question mark on the Radiohead site led to a screen that read, “It’s up to you.” Clicking on that led to another message: “No, really. It’s up to you.” According to early estimates, 1.2 million downloaded the record in the first two days, earning the band somewhere between $1 million and $5 million. Soon after, the withered husk of the recording industry gently commenced to collapse on itself.



Or possibly not. For while there was joy among Radiohead fans and those eager to get on with the post-scarcity economy, it remains unclear whether a new paradigm has been established. According to Tyler Cowen, an economics professor at George Mason University, Radiohead’s experiment isn’t likely to succeed with just any artist. “Radiohead fans are a partisan group,” Cowen says. “It’s very easy to get donations from them.” Moreover, an e-commerce survey claims that more than 60 percent of “In Rainbows” downloaders paid nothing; Radiohead disputed the findings. The exact numbers, however, remain known only to Radiohead.

But it’s a bit unrealistic to expect five dour introverts from Oxfordshire to come up with a universal fix to save the record industry. The Radiohead payment scheme, whatever the final tally, worked for Radiohead. (It may be portable; Paste, a magazine devoted to indie rock, ran a monthlong pay-what-you-want subscription deal in the wake of “In Rainbows.”) And yet at least some aspects of the old model may still prove useful. The CD of “In Rainbows” — an actual, tactile, old-economy product — will be available in record stores on Jan. 1. And EMI, the band’s spurned label, has proved resourceful itself, quickly assembling a Radiohead boxed set in time for the holidays, happily riding on publicity it didn’t pay a thing to create.
Chris Keeley

Some anthropologists argue that the idea of God first arose in larger societies, for the purpose of

Some anthropologists argue that the idea of God first arose in larger societies, for the purpose of curbing selfishness and promoting cooperation.

December 9, 2007
God Effect, The
By MARINA KRAKOVSKY

Some anthropologists argue that the idea of God first arose in larger societies, for the purpose of curbing selfishness and promoting cooperation. Outside a tightly knit group, the reasoning goes, nobody can keep an eye on everyone’s behavior, so these cultures invented a supernatural agent who could. But does thinking of an omniscient God actually promote altruism? The University of British Columbia psychologist Ara Norenzayan wanted to find out.

In a pair of studies published in Psychological Science, Norenzayan and his student Azim F. Shariff had participants play the so-called “dictator game,” a common way of measuring generosity toward strangers. The game is simple: you’re offered 10 $1 coins and told to take as many as you want and leave the rest for the player in the other room (who is, unbeknown to you, a research confederate). The fair split, of course, is 50-50, but most anonymous “dictators” play selfishly, leaving little or nothing for the other player.

In the control group of Norenzayan’s study, the vast majority of participants kept everything or nearly everything — whether or not they said they were religious. “Religious leaders always complain that people don’t internalize religion, and they’re right,” Norenzayan observes.

But is there a way to induce generosity? In the experimental condition, the researchers prompted thoughts of God using a well-established “priming” technique: participants, who again included both theists and atheists, first had to unscramble sentences containing words such as God, divine and sacred. That way, going into the dictator game, players had God on their minds without being consciously aware of it. Sure enough, the “God prime” worked like a charm, leading to fairer splits. Without the God prime, only 12 percent of the participants split the money evenly, but when primed with the religious words, 52 percent did.

When news of these findings made headlines, some atheists were appalled by the implication that altruism depends heavily on religion. Apparently, they hadn’t heard the whole story. In a second study, the researchers had participants unscramble sentences containing words like civic, contract and police — meant to evoke secular moral institutions. This prime also increased generosity. And unlike the religious prime, it did so consistently for both believers and nonbelievers. Until he conducts further research, Norenzayan can only speculate about the significance: “We need that common denominator that works for everyone.
Chris Keeley

home that costs a half-million dollars or more is essentially converted into a weed factory: rooms a

home that costs a half-million dollars or more is essentially converted into a weed factory: rooms are packed with hydroponically grown plants; fans and air ducts are installed for moisture control and to remove the skunky odor; the electricity box is rewired to steal electricity from power lines.

December 9, 2007
Marijuana Mansions
By STEVEN KURUTZ

Marijuana growers have long faced a dilemma. If they grow pot outdoors, weather conditions are unpredictable, and plants can be spotted from the air or accidentally discovered. Yet if they set up an indoor operation in a sleepy town, their suspicious activity tends to draw attention. The new and counterintuitive solution of some growers in California is to move into a busy, upscale suburban neighborhood and establish a “marijuana mansion,” as the street-life magazine Don Diva recently termed it.

A home that costs a half-million dollars or more is essentially converted into a weed factory: rooms are packed with hydroponically grown plants; fans and air ducts are installed for moisture control and to remove the skunky odor; the electricity box is rewired to steal electricity from power lines. With precision light and temperature control, the growers, who don’t live in the houses but check in a few times a week, can harvest more (and more potent) pot.

According to Lt. Greg Garland of the sheriff’s department in San Bernardino County, where more than 50 pot houses have been raided this year, the growers favor newer communities in outlying suburbs because they get more space for the money, and residents pay scant attention to their neighbors. “In these communities, both the husband and wife work; they’re busy coming and going,” Garland says. “One man we spoke to lived next to a grower for a year and wasn’t even sure what color the guy’s car was.”

Curiously, the subprime mortgage fiasco helped make the phenomenon possible: many pot houses were purchased by first-time homeowners using interest-only loans, and with speculators buying houses to flip them, it wasn’t uncommon for a home to sit empty for months. Authorities have started to alert the public to the signs of a pot house, a telltale one being a dry lawn. But, ever adaptive, the growers are hiring gardeners — just like their suburban neighbors.
Chris Keeley

Slide Show: Led Zeppelin Rocks Again

Slide Show: Led Zeppelin Rocks Again


Led Zeppelin Rocks Again

December 10, 2007
Music Review

Led Zeppelin Finds Its Old Power

LONDON, Dec. 10 — Some rock bands accelerate their tempos when they play their old songs decades after the fact. Playing fast is a kind of armor: a refutation of the plain fact of aging, all that unregainable enthusiasm and lost muscle mass, and a hard block against an old band’s lessened cultural importance.

But Led Zeppelin slowed its down a little. At the O2 arena here on Monday night, in its first concert since 1980 — without John Bonham, who died that year, but with Bonham’s son Jason as a natural substitute — the band found much of its old power in tempos that were more graceful than those on the old live recordings. The speed of the songs ran closer to those on the group’s old studio records, or slower yet. “Good Times Bad Times,” “Misty Mountain Hop,” and “Whole Lotta Love” were confident, easy cruises; “Dazed and Confused” was a glorious doom-crawl.

It all goes back to the blues, in which oozing gracefully is a virtue, and from which Led Zeppelin initially got half its ideas. Its singer, Robert Plant, doesn’t want you to forget that fact: he introduced “Trampled Underfoot” by explaining its connection to Robert Johnson’s “Terraplane Blues,” and mentioned Blind Willie Johnson as the inspiration for “Nobody’s Fault But Mine.” (Beyond that, the band spent 10 luxuriant minutes each in two other blues songs from its back catalog — “Since I Been Loving You” and “In My Time of Dying”).

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