December 9th, 2007

Chris Keeley

In his superb portrayal of Ian Curtis, Sam Riley makes the Joy Division frontman seem always alone.

In his superb portrayal of Ian Curtis, Sam Riley makes the Joy Division frontman seem always alone.


In his superb portrayal of Ian Curtis, Sam Riley makes the Joy Division

 By Roger Ebert

Ian Curtis, we are shown in a new film, was one of those introverted teenagers who gaze sadly upon their own destiny. In his cramped bedroom in Macclesfield, England, his schoolboy's desk holds files labeled for Poems, Novels, and so on. The files are filled not so much with his work as with his dreams. He lies on his back on his narrow bed, smokes, ponders, listens to music. He would become the object of cult veneration as lead singer of the late 1970s band Joy Division, and he would be a suicide at 23. There are times when we almost think that was his plan.

"Control," one of the most perceptive of rock music biopics, has been made by two people who knew him very well. It is based on a memoir by his wife Deborah (played by Samantha Morton), a teenager when they married, and directed by the photographer Anton Corbijn, whose early photos helped establish Curtis' image as young, handsome and sorrowful. The title of Deborah's book, Touching From a Distance, could describe all his relationships.

There is irony in the band name Joy Division, because Ian seems to experience little joy and much inner division, as an almost passive participant in his own career. Listen to the two albums the band made, and you hear his lead vocals as relentless complaints against --what? The melancholy that prevents him from feeling the emotions expressed by his words?

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Chris Keeley

the gestation of “In Rainbows,” as Radiohead tested songs in public, knowing they would be bootlegge

the gestation of “In Rainbows,” as Radiohead tested songs in public, knowing they would be bootlegged immediately. “The first time we ever did ‘All I Need,’ boom! It was up on YouTube,” Mr. Yorke said. “I think it’s fantastic. The instant you finish something, you’re really excited about it, you’re really proud of it, you hope someone’s heard it, and then, by God, they have. It’s O.K. because it’s on a phone or a video recorder. It’s a bogus recording, but the spirit of the song is there, and that’s good. At that stage that’s all you need to worry about.


You Want for This Article



By JON PARELES

OXFORD, England

SHORTLY after Radiohead released its album “In Rainbows” online in October, the band misplaced its password for Max/MSP, a geek-oriented music software package that the guitarist Jonny Greenwood uses constantly. It wasn’t the first time it had happened, Mr. Greenwood said over a cup of tea at the venerable Randolph Hotel here. As usual Radiohead contacted Max/MSP’s developers, Cycling ’74, for another password. “They wrote back,” Mr. Greenwood said, “‘Why don’t you pay us what you think it’s worth?’”

Well, Radiohead was asking for it. Those are the exact terms on which the band is selling the downloadable version of “In Rainbows”: Buyers can pay zero or whatever they please up to £99.99 (about $212) for the album in MP3 form. Sixteen years and seven albums into the career that has made Radiohead the most widely pondered band in rock, it is taking chances with its commerce as well as its art. For the beleaguered recording business Radiohead has put in motion the most audacious experiment in years.

Radiohead is not the first act to try what one of its managers, Chris Hufford, calls “virtual busking.” But it’s the first one that can easily fill arenas whenever it tours. “It feels good,” said Thom Yorke, the band’s leader, over a pint of hard cider at his local Oxford pub, the Rose and Crown. “It was a way of letting everybody judge for themselves.”

Radiohead’s pay-what-you-choose gambit didn’t just set off economic debates. It should also establish 2007 as two kinds of tipping point for recorded music. One is as the year of the superstar free agent. After fulfilling its contract in 2003 with its last album for EMI, “Hail to the Thief,” Radiohead turned down multimillion-dollar offers for a new major-label deal, preferring to stay independent.

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Chris Keeley

Flying to the sugar-white shores of Mauritius is about to get easier. Virgin Atlantic just began n

Flying to the sugar-white shores of Mauritius is about to get easier. Virgin Atlantic just began nonstop flights from London to this tiny coral-ringed island off the coast of Madagascar, and it also recently became a hub port for Indian Ocean excursions by the Italy-based Costa Cruises. Meanwhile, new hotels are opening up, including a Four Seasons resort, Anahita Mauritius, that features four restaurants, three beaches and an ayurveda spa.
Where do you want to go in 2008? »


Chris Keeley

http://www.yossimilogallery.com/

http://www.yossimilogallery.com/

Mallam Mantari Lamal with Mainasara, Nigeria, 2005
Thursday, November 29, from 6–8pm for the opening reception and book signing at 525 West 25th

Mallam Mantari Lamal with Mainasara, Nigeria, 2005
Thursday, November 29, from 6–8pm for the opening reception and book signing at 525 West 25th

http://www.yossimilogallery.com/
Chris Keeley

Facing Hamas and Hezbollah

This article can be found on the web at
*http://www.thenation.com/doc/20071119/cobban*

------------------------------------------------------------------------


   Facing Hamas and Hezbollah

by HELENA COBBAN

[from the November 19, 2007 issue]

One sunny morning in September 1993 I sat on the White House lawn,
watching bemused as American political notables lined up for a "grip and
grin" photo with Yasir Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin. For twenty-five years
previously--and until just days before that morning's signing of the
Oslo Accord--Arafat's Palestine Liberation Organization had been judged
by the US government to be a "foreign terrorist organization." On
Capitol Hill and in most of the mainstream media, the excoriation of
Arafat and the PLO had been long-lasting and virulent. But now, here
were scores of Congressional leaders and media bigwigs lining up to be
part of the new pro-Oslo zeitgeist.

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Chris Keeley

Emoticons During Wartime

Emoticons During Wartime

http://www.newyorker.com/talk/2007/12/10/071210ta_talk_mcnichol

  by Tom McNichol    December 10, 2007


:-)            No new attacks reported today.

 

:-(            New attack reported today.

 

=|:-)=       This e-mail is being monitored by Uncle Sam for your protection.

 

:-x            I’d rather not say in an e-mail that’s being monitored for

            my protection.

 

:-w            Our current leader speaks with forked tongue.

 

*:o)           Our current leader is a bozo.

 

/:-=(          Our current leader in some ways resembles Adolf Hitler,

                 at least in his disregard for civil liberties during wartime.

 

:-o            Uh-oh, what was that?

 

:-@           I hear screaming.

 

B)            Now donning protective goggles.

 

.-)            Good Sammy Davis, Jr., movie on tonight.

 

<|-)          Yes, the current conflict resembles Vietnam.

 

+<:-)        Pope to make appeal for peace.

 

(:3            No, I am the Walrus.

 

:(=)          Interesting Jimmy Carter piece in today’s Times.

 

[:-)           I’m listening to my iPod.

 

3:-o          Bovine encephalitis attack!

 

:-)8          Latest George Will column still doesn’t get it.

 

@:-[--      New Osama bin Laden message released.

 

8-/            Local chemical attack causing blindness.

 

:-#            Kiss your ass goodbye.
Chris Keeley

Uri Avnery on the Iranian Non-Bomb--12/8/07

Uri Avnery
8.12.07

How They Stole The Bomb From Us

IT WAS like an atom bomb falling on Israel.

The earth shook. Our political and military leaders were all in shock.
The headlines screamed with rage.

What happened?

A real catastrophe: the American intelligence community, comprising 16
different agencies, reached a unanimous verdict: already in 2003, the
Iranians terminated their efforts to produce a nuclear bomb, and they
have not resumed them since. Even if they change their mind in the
future, they will need at least five years to achieve their aim.


SHOULDN'T WE be overjoyed? Shouldn't the masses in Israel be dancing in
the streets, as they did on November 29, 1947, sixty years ago? After
all, we have been saved!

Until this week, we have been regularly hearing that - any minute now -
the Iranians will produce a bomb that threatens our very existence.
Nothing less. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the new Hitler of the Middle East,
who announces every second day that Israel must disappear from the map,
was about to fulfill his own prophecy.

A small nuclear bomb, even a teeny-weeny one like the ones dropped on
Japan, would be enough to wipe out the whole Zionist enterprise. If it
fell on Tel-Aviv's Rabin Square, the economic, cultural and military
center of Israel would be vaporized, together with hundreds of thousands
of Jews. A second Holocaust.

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