December 6th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Nicolai Howalt and Trine Søndergaard

Nicolai Howalt and Trine Søndergaard

HOW TO HUNT

10 Digital c-prints with handmade box

http://www.silversteinphotography.com/galleries.php?gid=339&i=11&page=next






Nicolai Howalt and Trine Søndergaard: How To Hunt

Shot from the vantage point of the lush Danish countryside, many of these large format photographs—comprised of digitally, interwoven multiple exposures—illustrate an entire hunt in one single image. Interactions between the armed, exclusively male hunters, picturesque landscapes, and various animals of prey are explored through this layering process. The resulting images are a set of scenic, meditative photographs that question the passing of time and human existence.
Chris Keeley

report on Kegadoru, a Japanese fashion that can be spotted in the legendary Harajuku precincts, wher

report on Kegadoru, a Japanese fashion that can be spotted in the legendary Harajuku precincts, where fashion is ten years ahead of the rest of the world (and sometimes, ten dimensions over). Kegadoru 

Kegadoru05

("injured idol") is the practice of wrapping your head and body in bandages as though you were badly injured. There's a stall in Camden Market in London that sells this stuff (here's my picture of their "No photos allowed" sign, which was the only part of the stall they let me photograph the last time I was there), and I've seen it in Tokyo as well. 





























http://www.tokyomango.com/

Weird Asia News says that the trend is meant to appeal to the kind of man who wants an "injured doll" -- and says that the white bandages denote virginal grace, while the black ones mean wickedness. Link to Mainichi Daily News, Link to Weird Asia News (via Tokyomango


 
Chris Keeley

in 2003 Mr. Prince’s version of an image that Mr. Krantz shot for Marlboro — showing a mounted cowbo

in 2003 Mr. Prince’s version of an image that Mr. Krantz shot for Marlboro — showing a mounted cowboy approaching a calf stranded in the snow — sold for $332,300 at Christie’s. Although the shot was blown up to heroic proportions, “there’s not a pixel, there’s not a grain that’s different,” he said. And so Mr. Krantz, whose Marlboro ads now appear mostly in Europe and Asia, began to grow angry.

More Photos » 



Jim Krantz’s photograph “Stretchin’ Out” (1997), taken for a Marlboro ad

December 6, 2007

If the Copy Is an Artwork, Then What’s the Original?

Since the late 1970s, when Richard Prince became known as a pioneer of appropriation art — photographing other photographs, usually from magazine ads, then enlarging and exhibiting them in galleries — the question has always hovered just outside the frames: What do the photographers who took the original pictures think of these pictures of their pictures, apotheosized into art but without their names anywhere in sight?

Recently a successful commercial photographer from Chicago named Jim Krantz was in New York and paid a quick visit to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, where Mr. Prince is having a well-regarded 30-year retrospective that continues through Jan. 9. But even before Mr. Krantz entered the museum’s spiral, he was stopped short by an image on a poster outside advertising the show, a rough-hewn close-up of a cowboy’s hat and outstretched arm.

Mr. Krantz knew it quite well. He had shot it in the late 1990s on a ranch in the small town of Albany, Tex., for a Marlboro advertisement. “Like anyone who knows his work,” Mr. Krantz said of his picture in a telephone interview, “it’s like seeing yourself in a mirror.” He did not investigate much further to see if any other photos hanging in the museum might be his own, but said of his visit that day, “When I left, I didn’t know if I should be proud, or if I looked like an idiot.”

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

A photograph by Seb Janiak that is part of In Fashion ’07 Miami Beach Art Photo Expo.

Art galleries disdain fashion photographs as work for hire



FASHION is a stepchild, in photography no less than in other areas of the culture. The reach of the imagery it produces influences everything from trash television to presidential campaigns. Yet the slick work cranked out by the fashion machine is rarely taken seriously. 



Max Vadukul/In Fashion '07 Miami Beach Art 

December 6, 2007

Work With Me, Baby

FASHION is a stepchild, in photography no less than in other areas of the culture. The reach of the imagery it produces influences everything from trash television to presidential campaigns. Yet the slick work cranked out by the fashion machine is rarely taken seriously.

Museums relegate fashion picture shows to their basements. Art galleries disdain fashion photographs as work for hire. Auction houses have historically tended to accord fashion images second-class status, sneaking a few first-rate fashion pictures into sales of photography’s certified masters. It’s not hard to fathom why friction exists between practitioners of fine art and fashion photography. For every self-styled Cindy Sherman hoping to hit it big in the gallery world, there are scores of competent but doubtless overpaid journeymen (fees of $100,000 a day are not rare for top fashion photographers) toiling in advertising’s lucrative fields.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

the Irving Penn platinum print a farseeing collector might have picked up at auction 10 years ago fo

the Irving Penn platinum print a farseeing collector might have picked up at auction 10 years ago for under $8,000 would now command $350,000, 

glorifying “heroin chic” in the mid-90s resulted in self-chastening throughout the industry. 

With the notable exception of Steven Meisel, whose work mines an obsession with fashion’s back pages, most fashion photographers of recent years have made it clear that their concerns lie mainly in “material that has nothing to do with the history of fashion,” as Mr. Aletti said.

he is helping propel fashion photographs in the direction of art and in the process creating an alluring hybrid, one that sometimes supports an aesthetics of glamour and just as often parodies it. “Fashion photography now is not about fashion alone,” Ms. de Beaupre said. “The material is of interest now because there is this strong creative and personal language

(fees of $100,000 a day are not rare for top fashion photographers) toiling in advertising’s lucrative fields.

Chris Keeley

British pop/soul singer Amy Winehouse, whose promising career has been sidelined by drug and alcohol

Amy Winehouse, whose promising career has been sidelined by drug and alcohol problems, followed with six Grammy bids.

Five acts received five nominations each -- rock band the Foo Fighters, rapper Jay-Z, hip-hop producer Timbaland, pop singer Justin Timberlake, and R&B singer T-Pain.

Winehouse, 24, was nominated in all four of the top categories: record of the year, album of the year, song of the year (a songwriter's award), and best new artist.

Her second disc, "Back to Black," will compete for album of the year with West's "Graduation," the Foo Fighters' "Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace," country singer Vince Gill's "These Days," and jazz pianist Herbie Hancock's "River: The Joni Letters."

Winehouse's autobiographical single "Rehab" will vie for record of the year with the Foo Fighters' "The Pretender," Timberlake's "What Goes Around ... Comes Around," and tracks from two R&B singers -- Beyonce's "Irreplaceable" and Rihanna's Umbrella," featuring Jay-Z.

"Rehab" and "Umbrella" were nominated for song of the year, alongside country star Carrie Underwood's "Before He Cheats," pop band Plain White T's "Hey There Delilah," and singer/songwriter Corinne Bailey Rae's "Like a Star."

The field for best new artist is dominated by women: Winehouse, Canadian singer/songwriter Feist, country singer Taylor Swift, R&B singer Ledisi, and the female-fronted rock band Paramore.

 
Chris Keeley

2.4 Million Now in Federal & State Prisons

2.4 Million Now in Federal & State Prisons

New statistics from the Justice Department show that nearly 2.4 million people were incarcerated in state and federal prisons at the end of last year. Another 5 million people were on parole or probation.
This means about one in every 31 adults in the United States was in prison, in jail or on supervised release at the end of last year.
According to an analysis of the data by the Sentencing Project, the data reflects deep racial disparities in the nation’s correctional institutions.
A record 905,000 African-Americans are now being held in prison.
In several states, incarceration rates for blacks were more than 10 times the rate of whites.

Chris Keeley

(no subject)

BANKSY

http://www.santasghetto.com/


2083204973_1949350539_o.jpg
A rat is smelled in Palestine…

http://www.santasghetto.com/

In celebration of the holiday season, British provocateur-at-large, SIR BANKSY has added his touch to the security wall separating Jerusalem & Palestine as part of this year’s annual pop-up SANTA’S GHETTO art shop which is set to open soon in the holiday motherland of Bethlehem as one of the most poignant shows of the year with incredibly high-quality work to spare. Featuring new works for sale by “street artists” BANKSY, SWOON, RON ENGLIGH, AIKO, BAST, LUCY MAC, KELSEY BROOKS, PAUL INSECT, GEE VAUCHER, ANTHONY MICALLEF, JONATHAN YEO, CONOR HARRINGTON, BLU, ERIC THE DOG, and 3D, among others, the show will benefit local needy children with 100% of profits being distributed to local non-governmental run, non-denominational charities
Chris Keeley

News from Turkey

Esteemed correspondents,

 In preparation for our June 2008 ten-day cruise on the Aegean from
Bodrum to Cesme, I sent our shipmates some findings from the three week
stay my wife and I recently had in Turkey.

 I have excised those portions dealing specifically with the cruise
itself, but thought that some overall impressions we had might be of
interest to you.

Collegial warm regards,
Ed

****

*News from Turkey*

_Recent Turkish Political History_


    As many of you may well know, the parliamentary elections in Turkey
of July 24th returned the Islamic party, AKP [/Adalet ve Kalkinma
Partisi/ -- Justice and Development Party] to a reinforced majority in
the Turkish Parliament.  In  the 2002 elections, the AKP gained 34% of
the seats, which, because of peculiarities in the Turkish electoral law,
gave the party a controlling majority; in 2007 they raised their
percentage to 46%.  Why?

    First of all, because Turkey has been doing extremely well
economically in the last five years, both because of the pro-business
policies of the AKP, and because of extraneous world circumstances.  Our
business-oriented Turkish friends voted for the AKP largely because of
this.  Those close Turkish friends who did not vote for the AKP
abstained.  They abstained because there is _ no_ credible opposition
party in Turkey today.  The old, corrupt and ineffective, center-left
and center-right parties have no significant support in the country.
[The AKP won in 80 of the 81 Turkish provinces; it lost only in Izmir,
where Atatürk's old party, the / Cumhuriyet Halk Partisi/ (Republican
People's Party) came out ahead.]

   
Collapse )