November 6th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Submersibles are used to ferry narcotics. Some in U.S. fear the tactic may inspire terrorists.

Submersibles are used to ferry narcotics. Some in U.S. fear the tactic may inspire terrorists.By Chris Kraul
Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

November 6, 2007

Drug transport

CALI, COLOMBIA — It was on a routine patrol that the Colombian coast guard stumbled upon an eerie outpost amid the mangroves: a mini-shipyard where suspected drug traffickers were building submarines.

Perched on a makeshift wooden dry dock late last month were two 55-foot-long fiberglass vessels, one ready for launch, the other about 70% complete. Each was outfitted with a 350-horsepower Cummins diesel engine and enough fuel capacity to reach the coast of Central America or Mexico, hundreds of miles to the north.

The vessels had cargo space that could fit 5 tons of cocaine, a senior officer with the Colombian coast guard's Pacific command said in an interview.

The design featured tubing for air, crude conning towers and cramped bunk space for a crew of four, he added.

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Chris Keeley

The F.B.I.’s criminal profilers try to think their way into the head of the offender.

The F.B.I.’s criminal profilers try to think their way into the head of the offender.

Dangerous Minds

Criminal profiling made easy.

by Malcolm Gladwell 

On November 16, 1940, workers at the Consolidated Edison building on West Sixty-fourth Street in Manhattan found a homemade pipe bomb on a windowsill. Attached was a note: “Con Edison crooks, this is for you.” In September of 1941, a second bomb was found, on Nineteenth Street, just a few blocks from Con Edison’s headquarters, near Union Square. It had been left in the street, wrapped in a sock. A few months later, the New York police received a letter promising to “bring the Con Edison to justice—they will pay for their dastardly deeds.” Sixteen other letters followed, between 1941 and 1946, all written in block letters, many repeating the phrase “dastardly deeds” and all signed with the initials “F.P.” In March of 1950, a third bomb—larger and more powerful than the others—was found on the lower level of Grand Central Terminal. The next was left in a phone booth at the New York Public Library. It exploded, as did one placed in a phone booth in Grand Central. In 1954, the Mad Bomber—as he came to be known—struck four times, once in Radio City Music Hall, sending shrapnel throughout the audience. In 1955, he struck six times. The city was in an uproar. The police were getting nowhere. Late in 1956, in desperation, Inspector Howard Finney, of the New York City Police Department’s crime laboratory, and two plainclothesmen paid a visit to a psychiatrist by the name of James Brussel.

Brussel was a Freudian. He lived on Twelfth Street, in the West Village, and smoked a pipe. In Mexico, early in his career, he had done counter-espionage work for the F.B.I. He wrote many books, including “Instant Shrink: How to Become an Expert Psychiatrist in Ten Easy Lessons.”

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Chris Keeley

Voodoo, meaning "spirit," may be one of the world's oldest ancestral, nature-honoring traditions. So

Voodoo, meaning "spirit," may be one of the world's oldest ancestral, nature-honoring traditions. Some anthropologists estimate that voodoo's roots in Benin (formerly Dahomey), West Africa, may go back 6,000 years. Today an estimated 60 million people practice voodoo worldwide. 

Voodoo by Les Stone (Digital Journalist, November 2007). "...The ceremony begins with a Roman Catholic prayer. Then three drummers begin to play syncopated rhythms. The attendees begin to dance around a tree in the center of the yard, moving faster and harder with the rising pulse of the beat. The priest draws sacred symbols in the dust with cornmeal and rum poured on the ground to honor the spirits. 

http://www.lesstone.com/index2.html


http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0711/x_voodoo_thumbs.html