November 2nd, 2007

Chris Keeley

Mr. Puryear, who was born in 1941 and grew up in Washington, D.C., is a former painter who emerged f

Mr. Puryear, who was born in 1941 and grew up in Washington, D.C., is a former painter who emerged from the Minimalist and Postminimalist vortex making hand-worked, mostly wood sculptures. These soothe more than seethe, balancing between the geometric and the organic with Zen aplomb. 


The Martin Puryear sculpture "Ladder for Booker T. Washington" (1996). 

Martin Puryear

Humanity’s Ascent, in Three Dimensions

On Sunday, when the Museum of Modern Art’s 30-year retrospective of the sculptor Martin Puryear opens, the New York art world will find itself in what may be an unprecedented situation. For the first time in recent memory — maybe ever — two of the city’s most prominent museums will be presenting large, well-done exhibitions of living African-American artists. The Whitney Museum’s 15-year survey of Kara Walker’s work has been searing hearts, minds and eyes since it opened early last month. Now it is Mr. Puryear’s turn to weave his finely nuanced yet insistent spell.

Perhaps in the future welcome and overdue coincidences like this will no longer merit mention. In the meantime this one has the added bonus of representing radically different ways of being an artist, black or otherwise. Ms. Walker comes out of Conceptual and appropriation art and makes the bitter legacy of race relations in this country the engine of her cut-paper installations, animated films and language pieces.

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Chris Keeley

CODEPINK Activist Barred from Capitol After Calling Rice “War Criminal”

CODEPINK Activist Barred from Capitol After Calling Rice “War Criminal”

Friday, November 2nd, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/11/02/1337206

CODEPINK activist Desiree Anita Ali-Fairooz was barred from Capitol Hill after she covered her hands in fake blood and approached Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice last week at the start of a congressional hearing. Ali-Fairooz said that the blood "of millions of Iraqis" was on the hands of the Bush administration. [includes rush transcript]

 


We end today's broadcast here in Washington D.C. with Desiree Anita Ali-Fairooz. She is the antiwar activist who covered her hands in fake blood and approached Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice last week at the start of a congressional hearing. A photograph of Desiree Anita Ali-Fairooz and Rice appeared in newspapers across the country.

After she approached Rice, Ali-Fairooz screamed that the blood "of millions of Iraqis" was on the hands of the Bush administration. Moments later Desiree Anita Ali-Fairooz was arrested. She was charged with disorderly conduct, defacing of government property and assault on a federal officer. She has been banned from the grounds of Capitol Hill and reportedly could face up prison time.

 

  • Desiree Anita Ali-Fairooz. She is former children's librarian and schoolteacher from Texas. She quit her job in March to dedicate her life to antiwar activism and to organizing with the group CODEPINK.

 

  • Medea Benjamin. Founder of CODEPINK.

AMY GOODMAN: We turn to another issue right now that has been occurring in

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Chris Keeley

basically that's a potential death sentence and you know it

White House Downplays State Dept. Opposition to Iraq Posts
The Bush administration is working to diffuse a public relations fiasco over news U.S. diplomats are refusing mandatory job assignments in Iraq. On Wednesday, hundreds of foreign service officers denounced the plans at a town-hall meeting in Washington. Video of the meeting was released on Thursday. State Department official Rachel Schneller complained she was denied coverage for medical treatment after she returned from Iraq with post-traumatic stress disorder.
    Rachel Schneller: "I came back (from Iraq) and was diagnosed almost immediately with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and I've been receiving treatment for that ever since, and I think that it's just one of those things. I mean, the more people that serve in war zones, the more people will come back with those sorts of war wounds, it's just going to happen, it's just one of those things. And I actually don't regret getting treatment for it, it was just one of those things I had to do, but I have to say that absolutely none of the treatment I received for it came from the State Department."
Senior Foreign Service officer Jack Crotty received “sustained applause” after calling service in Iraq “a potential death sentence.”
    Jack Crotty: "Incoming is coming in every day, rockets are hitting the Green Zone, so if you force assign people, that is really shifting the terms of what we are about. It's one thing if someone believes in what's going on over there and volunteers, but it's another thing to send someone over there on a forced assignment. And I'm sorry, but basically that's a potential death sentence and you know it."
Around fifty employees will be forced to take positions in Iraq next summer. Speaking in Ireland, Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice downplayed the meeting, saying : “I am very sorry that the recounting of the comments of a few people left the impression that somehow, the Foreign Service does not want to serve in Iraq. It could not be farther from the truth.” In Washington, White House spokesperson Dana Perino said the administration is concerned with officials’ safety. White House spokesperson Dana Perino: "The President understands that service in a war zone can be very difficult, it's distressing for the families, but they should be reassured as well that Secretary Rice takes this issue very seriously, she's concerned about their safety and that is why she has worked very hard to make sure they have all the tools they need and all the protection they need to get their jobs done."
Chris Keeley

Too often Muslims are against physical labor, so they bring in Koreans and Pakistanis while their yo

Too often Muslims are against physical labor, so they bring in Koreans and Pakistanis while their young people remain unemployed.” White House spokesperson Dana Perino said Rumsfeld’s comments are not in line with the president’s views

Rumsfeld: Muslims “Against Physical Labor”

The Bush administration is trying to distance itself from newly-released comments from then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld during his time at the Pentagon. On Thursday, the Washington Post published excerpts of memos that Rumsfeld dubbed “snowflakes.” In one entry, Rumsfeld said Middle East oil wealth had detached Muslims “from the reality of the work, effort and investment.” He continued: “Too often Muslims are against physical labor, so they bring in Koreans and Pakistanis while their young people remain unemployed.” White House spokesperson Dana Perino said Rumsfeld’s comments are not in line with the president’s views. The memos also show Rumsfeld was distressed by news coverage criticizing his record and the Iraq war. After several retired generals called for his resignation in April 2006, Rumsfeld ordered staffers to deflect attention from Iraq. He wrote : “Talk about Somalia, the Philippines, etc. Make the American people realize they are surrounded in the world by violent extremists.” Rumsfeld also instructed Pentagon officials to write letters responding to newspaper columnists who had criticized the war.
Chris Keeley

Hiroshima Pilot Paul Tibbets Dead at 92

Hiroshima Pilot Paul Tibbets Dead at 92
And Paul Tibbets, pilot of the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, has died at the age of ninety-two. Tibbets named his plane the Enola Gay after his mother. He remained a steadfast supporter of the bombing until his death. In 1982, the film Atomic Café compiled government propaganda footage designed to reassure Americans that the atomic bomb was not a threat to their safety. Tibbets was among those featured.
    Colonel Paul Tibbets: “I have been accused of being insane, being a drunkard, being everything that you could imagine a derelict to be as a result of a guilty conscience for doing this, and as I say, no one's ever come to my defense in that regard. I look at it this way, that my part in this thing may well have been something that later or now that the U.S. government might be looking at somewhat with a guilt complex. And the feeling could be that the less said about it by the United States government, the better.”
He once said that he has never lost a night’s sleep over bombing Haroshima.
Chris Keeley

Winehouse Appeals

Winehouse Appeals

In Marijuana Case

The lawyer for the British pop singer Amy Winehouse said yesterday that she will appeal her fine last month for marijuana possession in Norway because she did not understand that under Norwegian law, accepting a fine amounts to pleading guilty, The Associated Press reported. The lawyer, Ole Kvelstad, contended that she had been questioned without legal representation or an interpreter and had not understood the Norwegian-language charges she signed. He said that pleading guilty in a drug case could have serious consequences when Ms. Winehouse, who has spoken openly about her taste for marijuana and alcohol, seeks to enter the United States. Police Attorney Rudolf Christoffersen of Bergen said she was questioned by an English-speaking officer, who translated the charges and explained the consequences of accepting the fine. Ms. Winehouse and her husband, Blake Fielder-Civil, were arrested in Bergen on Oct. 18 and held overnight on charges of illegal drug possession. They were released the next morning after paying fines of $715 each for possessing a quarter-ounce of marijuana.

Chris Keeley

American Gangster

American Gangster is compelling in the same way that many mob-related motion pictures are compelling, but it fails to achieve the greatness that the best of them attain. The problem with American Gangster may be that it tries to hard to provide balance between the protagonist and the antagonist but never really achieves it. While the story is rarely dull and there's plenty of material to fill up the more than 2 1/2 hour running time, there's an overall absence of dramatic tension. Ridley Scott rarely creates an uninteresting motion picture, and this is no exception, but American Gangster will not go down as one of the respected director's best efforts.

The cast is headlined by two Oscar winners: Denzel Washington as Harlem drug lord Frank Lucas and Russell Crowe as North Jersey drug cop Richie Roberts.

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Chris Keeley

The documentary “Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten” uses rare footage, interviews and even snipp

The documentary “Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten” uses rare footage, interviews and even snippets of an animated “Animal Farm” to tell its story



archival material provides a sad and subtle reminder of his absence, of the void left by his sudden death at 50, from a heart attack, in 2002.

 

 

Like Mr. Temple’s two movies about the Sex Pistols — the eyewitness “Great Rock ’n’ Roll Swindle” (1980) and the revisionist “Filth and the Fury” (2000) — “Joe Strummer” is not so much a portrait as a collage.

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Chris Keeley

methuselah foundation

http://www.methuselahfoundation.org/

Dodging death has long been a dream.

Our earliest recorded legend is that of Gilgamesh, who finds and loses the secret of immortality.

The Greek goddess Eos prevails on Zeus to allow her human lover Tithonus to live eternally, forgetting, unfortunately, to ask that he also not become aged and frail. He winds up such a dried husk she turns him into a grasshopper.

In "It Ain't Necessarily So," Ira Gershwin writes:

Methus'lah lived nine hundred years 

De Grey's looks are almost as striking as his ambitions.

His slightly graying chestnut hair is swept back into a ponytail. His russet beard falls to his belly. His mustache -- as long as a hand -- would have been the envy of Salvador Dali. When he talks about people soon putting a higher premium on health than wealth, he twirls the ends of his mustache back behind his ears, murmuring, "So many women, so much time."

A little over six feet tall and lean -- he weighs 147 pounds, the same as in his teenage years -- de Grey shows up in a denim work shirt open to the sternum, ripped jeans and scuffed sneakers, looking for all the world like a denizen of Silicon Valley.

Not far from the mark. De Grey's original academic field is computer science and artificial intelligence. He has become the darling of some Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who think changing the world is all in a day's work. Peter Thiel, the co-founder and former CEO of PayPal -- who sold it in 2002 for $1.5 billion, pocketing $55 million himself -- has dropped $3.5 million on de Grey's Methuselah Foundation.

http://www.methuselahfoundation.org/