October 13th, 2007

Chris Keeley

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A former commander of coalition forces in Iraq issued a harsh assessment of U.S.

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A former commander of coalition forces in Iraq issued a harsh assessment of U.S. management of the war, saying that American political leaders cost American lives on the battlefield with their "lust for power."

Retired Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, coalition commander in 2003 and 2004, called the Iraq war "a nightmare with no end in sight," for which he said the Bush administration, the State Department and Congress all share blame.

Sanchez told a group of military reporters in Arlington, Virginia, on Friday that such dereliction of duty by a military officer would mean immediate dismissal or court martial, but the politicians have not been held accountable.

He said the Iraq war plan from the start was "catastrophically flawed, unrealistically optimistic," and the administration has not provided the resources necessary for victory, which he said the military could never achieve on its own.

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Chris Keeley

For George, it was all maya,” he said, referring to the Hindu concept of cosmic illusion. “Something

Mr. Clapton’s ex-wife, Pattie Boyd, with her first husband, George Harrison, in 1966.



For George, it was all maya,” he said, referring to the Hindu concept of cosmic illusion. “Something would come up, and we would get together to play because that’s what drew us together. His take was purely spiritual, that we could always get past the physical world.

 Layla by Eric Clapton (mp3)
Chris Keeley

LONDON (AP) -- Pattie Boyd is the A-list musicians' muse. A convent schoolgirl turned swinging Londo

Boyd, now a photographer who has exhibited her work in London and San Francisco, has left recrimination behind her.

LONDON (AP) -- Pattie Boyd is the A-list musicians' muse. A convent schoolgirl turned swinging London fashion model, Boyd was married to Beatle George Harrison, then to guitar god Eric Clapton -- and the relationships live on in song.

For Boyd, Harrison wrote ''Something,'' one of the Fab Four's most-covered tunes. Clapton's passion for his friend's wife inspired the scorching ''Layla.'' Later, when Boyd had left Harrison and married Clapton, he serenaded her with ''Wonderful Tonight.''

Even now, 63-year-old Boyd says, ''there is still a shiver of thrill'' when she hears the songs.

''I'm so familiar with them, they've become intimate. They've become a part of me. So when I hear them it's a part of my body I can hear,'' she said.

The songs made Boyd an icon through the words of others. She tells her own side of the story in the newly released memoir ''Wonderful Tonight,'' written with royal biographer Penny Junor.

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