September 13th, 2007

Chris Keeley

http://valleywag.com/

 http://valleywag.com/

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 12 — In the annals of perks enjoyed by America’s corporate executives, the founders of Google may have set a new standard: an uncrowded, federally managed runway for their private jet that is only a few minutes’ drive from their offices.

For $1.3 million a year, Larry Page and Sergey Brin get to park their customized wide-body Boeing 767-200, as well as two other jets used by top Google executives, on Moffett Field, an airport run by NASA that is generally closed to private aircraft.

It is a perk that is likely to turn other Silicon Valley tycoons green with envy, as no other private jets have landing rights there. But it may not sit well with a community that generally considers itself proud to have Google in its midst.

How did the two billionaires get such a coveted parking place for the jet, which is unusually large and rare by private jet standards? Officials at the Ames Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the agency signed a unique agreement last month that allows it to place scientific instruments and researchers on planes used by the Google founders. NASA gets to collect scientific data on some flights of those jets, which in addition to the Boeing 767-200 includes two Gulfstream Vs.

http://valleywag.com/

Chris Keeley

Larry Page and Lucy Southworth

Larry Page and Lucy Southworth

Larry Page and Lucy Southworth Pictures

by Gilad on March 11th, 2006

Sources tell me that back in September Larry Page and Lucy Southworth went on a vacation in Hawaii, well except for a baby they got everything else taken care of…

Chris Keeley

Seen at Marc Jacobs shows, from left: Padma Lakshmi and Russell Simmons; Kim Gordon, Vincent Gallo a

Seen at Marc Jacobs shows, from left: Padma Lakshmi and Russell Simmons; Kim Gordon, Vincent Gallo and Heath Ledger; Elisha Cuthbert and Helena Christensen. 

DRAG queens, porn stars, washed-up rock stars, A-list fashion personnel and D-list celebrities: the coolest thing about Marc Jacobs, the designer who always insists that he’s not cool, is how he gathers around him, season after season and year after year, a posse of all the adorable high-school outcasts 




real estate mogul Vincent Gallo

the guest list would be unaware that Mr. Jacobs has been in and out of rehab lately, as he would frankly tell you himself. Debatable as the chic of drug abuse

blue-chip-artist-of-the-moment John Currin and his wife, Rachel Feinstein; or the actor Heath Ledger; or the personality Victoria Beckham, as shiny and expressionless as a inflatable doll; or the R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe; or Debbie Harry,


John Currin and John Reinhold. 

Why is Marc cool? I have no idea,” Lady Bunny, the D.J. drag queen whose signature hairdo is a platinum blond Niagara, said Monday night, in the long hours (two plus) before the Jacobs show began.

“Honey, I don’t know anything about fashion,” said the drag personality, who was born Jon Ingle an implausible 45 years ago and who actually sits on a fashion panel charged with judging style bloopers for Star magazine.

“I’m just his dealer and I have to get backstage,” Lady Bunny said then, adding quickly that he was just making a joke: “Ha ha ha.”

But, of course, the wisecrack was so inside, it played to the Jacobs mystique. Few of the more than 1,000 people who made it onto the guest list would be unaware that Mr. Jacobs has been in and out of rehab lately, as he would frankly tell you himself. Debatable as the chic of drug abuse may be, it’s hard to dispute that the theater of celebrity substance abuse is having a fashion moment. And that, too, is part of what makes the front row of a Marc Jacobs show a snapshot of where, at any particular time, as a culture, we find ourselves.





I’ve only gone to one other fashion show and they paid me,” said the occupationally various Courtney Love, referring to the commonplace practice of packing front rows with rented celebrities. “I never got involved with that other stuff — ‘Oh, Tom Ford wants to make you pancakes.’ ”

“I come to Marc because he stuck with me when I thought all I had was $2,800 in the bank,” she said. “Even though it turned out I had eight million I didn’t know I had.”

She also comes because he asks her, of course, and because in the past he has sent her free clothes to wear to court. “I couldn’t show up in them, of course — too cute and fashion-forward,” Ms. Love said. For court dates, it is rarely helpful to be seen in a conical velvet party hat and a transparent crepe shirtdress over a satin bra. “You’re going to get a lot of damn community service if you don’t look makeup-less and contrite,” she said. 

 
Chris Keeley

the dhamma brothers” after the Dhamma, or dharma, the term for the collective teachings of the Buddh

the dhamma brothers” after the Dhamma, or dharma, the term for the collective teachings of the Buddha) for hours, discussing their childhoods, their crimes, their struggles to get through each day in lockup and the Sisyphean challenge of trying personal transformation inside an often-hopeless prison culture



Staring at Death, and Finding Their Bliss

The inmates’ letters started to arrive at Jenny Phillips’s home in Concord, Mass., during the summer of 2002. For five years they’ve kept coming — 200 at last count, written by 14 men serving time in the Donaldson Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison with a death-row capacity for 24 inmates outside Birmingham, Ala.

“Jenny, you have become a driving force of inspiration in my life,” read one typical note, from Edward Johnson, now serving a life sentence for aiding and abetting a triple homicide.

Ms. Phillips, a cultural anthropologist, psychotherapist and now documentary filmmaker, cemented this bond during the filming of “The Dhamma Brothers,” a documentary she began in 2002 chronicling a 10-day meditation retreat in Donaldson. She interviewed the 36 participating prisoners (called “the dhamma brothers” after the Dhamma, or dharma, the term for the collective teachings of the Buddha) for hours, discussing their childhoods, their crimes, their struggles to get through each day in lockup and the Sisyphean challenge of trying personal transformation inside an often-hopeless prison culture.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Video posted on YouTube shows the Reverend Lennox Yearwood of the Hip Hop Caucus being tackled by si

 Video posted on YouTube shows the Reverend Lennox Yearwood of the Hip Hop Caucus being tackled by six Capitol police officers after he tried to enter the hearing. 

Democracy While Black" - Rev. Lennox Yearwood Arrested, Charged with Assault While Entering Petraeus Hearing

Thursday, September 13th, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/09/13/1445202

The Rev. Lennox Yearwood, president of the Hip Hop Caucus, was tackled by six Capitol police officers after he tried to enter the Petraeus hearing on Monday. Rev. Yearwood was injured in the incident taken to hospital. He was later charged him with felony assault of a police officer. [includes rush transcript]

 


President Bush is expected to announce tonight plans to reduce the number of U.S. troops in Iraq to 130,000 by next July.

In a meeting with top Democratic leaders, the president said he was trying to find common ground on Iraq by planning to "start doing some redeployment."

But at the meeting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi reportedly interjected, "No you're not, Mr. President. You're just going back to the pre-surge level."

President Bush will be outlining his plans in a nationally televised address to the nation at 9 p.m. His speech comes just three days after General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker came before Congress to recommend the continuation of the war for the indefinite future.

On Monday, at least 10 protesters were arrested during General David Petraeus' hearing. Most were arrested for disrupting the Congressional hearing but at least one activist was arrested for simply trying to watch the proceedings.

Video posted on YouTube shows the Reverend Lennox Yearwood of the Hip Hop Caucus being tackled by six Capitol police officers after he tried to enter the hearing.

 

  • Rev. Lennox Yearwood being tackled by Capitol police.

     

Rev. Yearwood was injured in the incident and was taken to the hospital. The capitol police charged him with felony assault of a police officer.

The Rev. Lennox Yearwood is the founder of the Hip Hop Caucus. He is among

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

The license plate is almost as large as her automobile, but Miss Mary Bay likes her car because it i

The license plate is almost as large as her automobile, but Miss Mary Bay likes her car because it is easy to park. 

Traffic-Stopper: 1924

"The license plate is almost as large as her automobile, but Miss Mary Bay likes her car because it is easy to park. Miss Bay is shown braving the traffic of Washington." January 29, 1924. View full size. National Photo Co. Collection

Chris Keeley

The Osaka love thieves

 
The Osaka love thieves

The Great Happiness Space - Tale of an Osaka Love Thief is a great documentary. Sad, sassy, strong in storyline, never simple. It overflows like the overpriced champagne that runs throughout the film with bubbles of universally recognisable behaviour bottled in the super specific setting of a Japanese host bar.

Sharp suits, sex, exploitation, great haircuts, ultra-urban interiors, cute smiles, loneliness, acid rain, money and love.

Cuddle up to your laptop and watch it here.

GHSposter.jpg

(via)

Chris Keeley

He also suggests that faith in God facilitated a turn toward the life within, helping to make a rich

 He also suggests that faith in God facilitated a turn toward the life within, helping to make a rich life of introspection possible. 



The Way We Live Now

Defender of the Faith?

Late in life — he was in his 80s, in fact — Sigmund Freud got religion. No, Freud didn’t begin showing up at temple every Saturday, wrapping himself in a prayer shawl and reading from the Torah. To the end of his life, he maintained his stance as an uncompromising atheist, the stance he is best known for down to the present. In “The Future of an Illusion,” he described belief in God as a collective neurosis: he called it “longing for a father.” But in his last completed book, “Moses and Monotheism,” something new emerges. There Freud, without abandoning his atheism, begins to see the Jewish faith that he was born into as a source of cultural progress in the past and of personal inspiration in the present. Close to his own death, Freud starts to recognize the poetry and promise in religion.

A good deal of the antireligious polemic that has recently been abroad in our culture proceeds in the spirit of Freud’s earlier work. In his defense of atheism, “God Is Not Great,” Christopher Hitchens cites Freud as an ally who, he believes, exposed the weak-minded childishness of religion. Sam Harris and Richard Dawkins come out of the same Enlightenment spirit of hostile skepticism to faith that infuses “The Future of an Illusion.” All three contemporary writers want to get rid of religion immediately and with no remainder.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

The Cash Phase Rubin worked with Johnny Cash for 10 years and produced five of his albums.

 The Cash Phase Rubin worked with Johnny Cash for 10 years and produced five of his albums.



Videos of Songs Produced by Rick Rubin.

"(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (to Party!)," by The Beastie Boys

"Not Ready to Make Nice," by the Dixie Chicks

"Under The Bridge," by the Red Hot Chili Peppers

"Walk This Way," by Run DMC featuring Aerosmith

Rubin, wearing his usual uniform of loose khaki pants and billowing white T-shirt, his sunglasses in his pocket, his feet bare, fingers a string of lapis lazuli Buddhist prayer beads, believed to bring wisdom to the wearer. Since Rubin's beard and hair nearly cover his face, his voice, which is soft and reassuring, becomes that much more vivid. He seems to be one with the room, which is lined in floor-to-ceiling books, most of which are of a spiritual nature, whether about Buddhism, the Bible or New Age quests for enlightenment. The library and the house are filled with religious iconography mixed with mementos from the world of pop. A massive brass Buddha is flanked by equally enormous speakers; vintage cardboard cutouts of John, Paul, George and Ringo circa "Help!" are placed around a multiarmed statue of Vishnu. On a low table, there are crystals and an old RadioShack cassette recorder that Rubin uses to listen to demo tapes; a framed photo of Jim Morrison stares at a crystal ball. In Rubin's world, music and spirituality collide.
Rubin also suggested (strongly) that Columbia become the first major record company to go green and abolish plastic jewel boxes for all its CDs

In high school, around 1980, Rubin started listening to a mix of heavy metal and punk rock. (He recalls buying the Germs' record "GI" and "Back in Black" by AC/DC on the same day.) "I saw the Ramones play every week," he said. "I was the only punk in my high school." Rubin paused. "I've always been an outsider. When I did magic, I was the only kid. When I worked with Johnny Cash, I was completely out of place in Nashville. And when I started Def Jam, I was the only white guy in the hip-hop world."

Chris Keeley

Public Testimony by William R. Polk in Washington DC

This message is primarily for those of you living in the Washington
area, but I believe will interest all of you.
   On Wednesday, September 19 at 9:30 a.m. Dr. William R. Polk will be
testifying at an open to the public hearing before the Democratic Caucus
on Capitol Hill. The venue will be the Cannon Caucus Room in the Cannon
House Office Building, the same place where the Petraeus-Crocker show
occurred on Monday earlier this week. Those interested in hearing Dr.
Polk's latest take on the Iraq war situation will find attendance most
worthwhile, especially as Sept. 18 is the publication date of his latest
study relating to that subject. The publisher is HarperCollins.
This is Bill Polk's third book on Iraq in as many years:
"Understanding Iraq" in 2005 and (with George McGovern) "Out of Iraq: A
Practical Plan for Withdrawal Now" in 2006.  The title of the new book
is "Violent Politics" and the sub-title is "A History of Insurgency,
Terrorism & Guerrilla War, from the American Revolution To Iraq."  I
think this third book will be even more valuable and timely than the
other two, for it constitutes a historical analysis of insurgency
warfare over three centuries, and gives scholarly substance to the
famous admonition that those who don't learn from history are condemned
to repeat it. In eleven chapters Polk covers the American Revolution and
then insurrections or liberation movements in a wide range of geography,
including Spain, the Philippines, Ireland, Yugoslavia, Greece, Kenya,
Algeria, Vietnam and Afghanistan (earlier), with a strong concluding
chapter about Iraq, current Afghanistan and new wars in preparation as
part of the "long war" we are allegedly now engaged in.
  Hope to see you on the Hill next Wednesday.
    Bob Keeley

--