May 31st, 2007

Chris Keeley

Zagarella, a recovering alcoholic who recently had started drinking again, was drunk during the orde

Zagarella, a recovering alcoholic who recently had started drinking again, was drunk during the ordeal, Fitzpatrick said. Zagarella told police he went to the house to settle a financial dispute with his boss, the ex-husband, who could not be reached yesterday.A drunken ex-convict stabbed and killed a grandmother in West Islip, then sexually assaulted one of the grandchildren she was baby-sitting before turning a rifle on himself and taking his own life yesterday afternoon, Suffolk police said.\n\u003cbr\>\u003cbr\>As police tried to negotiate with the killer -- who barricaded himself and the two children inside the Kime Avenue home -- nearby residents were forced into a lockdown for more than 14 tense hours during what should have been a relaxing Memorial Day.\n\u003cbr\>\u003cbr\>Shortly after 10 p.m. on Sunday, Philip Zagarella arrived at the home to see the ex-wife of his boss, Homicide Squad Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick said. Police said Zagarella was an employee in the ex-husband's construction company and a family friend. W. Islip gunman kills one, assaults childBY CHRISTINE ARMARIO AND JENNIFER SINCO KELLEHER. A drunken ex-convict stabbed and killed a grandmother in West Islip, then sexually assaulted one of the grandchildren she was baby-sitting before turning a rifle on himself and taking his own life yesterday afternoon, Suffolk police said.

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Chris Keeley

Islip killer's painful past comes to light

Islip killer's painful past comes to light - When Philip Zagarella took a West Islip family hostage and killed a beloved 59-year-old grandmother before taking his own life, it was the final destination on a trail of alcoholism, violence, and cries for help, court documents reveal Zagarella, 50, had been abused as a child, neglected by his mentally ill mother, and introduced to alcohol as a 15-year-old by his equally troubled father, his family wrote a Rockland County judge just before he was to be sentenced for a 1986 burglary, court records show.

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Chris Keeley

Little boy ruins sand mandala

Little boy ruins sand mandala

Last week, eight Tibetan monks were halfway complete with an incredibly intricate sand mandala they were creating in Kansas City's Union Station when a young boy went under the protective rope and messed up the entire design. The monks were gone when it happened but the episode was caught on a security camera. From the Associated Press (photo by monk Dhukar Tsering):
 C Pictures 2007 05 25 Mn Dance Mokas101-1 "He did a little tap dance on it, completely destroying it," said Lama Chuck Stanford, of the Rime Buddhist Center in Kansas City.

A security tape shows the boy's mother returning to the mandala, grabbing her son by the arm and walking out of camera range...

"No problem," Geshe Lobsang Sumdup, leader of the group from the Drepung Gomang Monastery in southern India, said through a translator. "We didn't get despondent. We have three days more. So we will have to work harder."
Link (Thanks, Jennifer Lum!)
Chris Keeley

Modernism’s Utopian agenda, as well as the ambiguous, sometimes subversive qualities associated with

Modernism’s Utopian agenda, as well as the ambiguous, sometimes subversive qualities associated with Modernist art, design, and architecture cut against the grain of authoritarian political regimes. During the 1930s, artists in Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union were severely persecuted for producing experimental, forward-looking work.

Images from Modernism: Designing a New World 1914—1939
Gustavs Klucis
Under the Banner of Lenin for Socialist Construction, 1930
Color lithograph
V&A: E.404-1988
© V&A Images/Victoria and Albert Museum
London © 2007 Estate of Gustavs Klucis / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Chris Keeley

Her chief strategist, Mark Penn, not only polls for America's biggest companies but also runs one of

This article can be found on the web at
http://www.thenation.com/doc/20070604/berman


Hillary Inc.

by ARI BERMAN

[from the June 4, 2007 issue]

In a packed ballroom in midtown Manhattan, Hillary Clinton is addressing hundreds of civil rights activists and labor leaders convened by the Rev. Al Sharpton for his annual National Action Network conference. The junior senator from New York starts slowly but picks up steam when she hits on the economic anxiety many in the room feel. "We're not making progress," she says, her sharp Midwestern monotone accented with a bit of Southern twang. "Wages are flat." Nods of agreement. "This economy is not working!" Applause. She's not quite the rhetorical populist her husband was on the campaign trail, but she can still feel your pain. "Everything has been skewed," Clinton says, jabbing her index finger for emphasis, "to help the privileged and the powerful at the expense of everybody else!"

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