May 22nd, 2007

Chris Keeley

If anyone cares, this is my candidate for president. Thanks to our

If anyone cares, this is my candidate for president. . At least the AP has reported it. But
look how they inserted a negative attack on the candidate in the middle
of the report. This is proper media coverage of this event? Check out
Richardson. He has more experience, more brains, more integrity, more
potential than any of the others. He is Half Hispanic and Half Boston
Brahmin. How about that combination? Bob Keeley

-------- Original Message --------
Subject:        Richardson Joins Presidential Race
Date:   Mon, 21 May 2007 13:38:22 -0400


*Richardson Joins Presidential Race
*

By NEDRA PICKLER
The Associated Press
Monday, May 21, 2007; 1:18 PM

LOS ANGELES -- New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson vowed to repair the
"ravages" of the Bush administration Monday as he formally announced his
campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination in prepared remarks.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Afghanistan's child opium addicts.

http://www.thejunkyswife.com/2007/05/afghanistans-child-opium-addicts.html

Afghanistan's child opium addicts.

From Al Jazeera:

Afghanistan remains infamous as an exporter of opium. However, opium use within the country is just as rampant, with perhaps one million addicts in the country, according to the UN, of whom more than 600,000 are under the age of 15.

Al Jazeera's Zeina Khodr travelled to the mainly rural province of Badakshan in northeastern Afghanistan, where children under five years old are routinely given opium by their mothers.

Three-year-old Said is an opium addict. Without it, he becomes restless.

His mother Zarbibi shares her child's condition. She herself is a user and has been one for the past four years.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

These vagabonds,” he said, “are good only for drinking, dancing and killing

Waterfront shacks, like those in Lleras, a slum controlled by a rebel group, have become a central front in Colombia’s four-decade-old civil conflict. More Photos > 














Cocaine Wars Make Port Colombia’s Deadliest City

BUENAVENTURA, Colombia, May 15 — Visitors to this city can be forgiven for thinking no place is safe here. Gunfire often echoes through the slums surrounding its port, the country’s most important on the Pacific coast. As larger cities have calmed, Buenaventura has emerged as the deadliest urban center in Colombia’s long internal war.

Soldiers search almost every car at checkpoints on the winding road from Cali. Guerrillas recently fired mortar shells at the police headquarters. The stately Hotel Estación, a neo-Classical gem built in 1928, where executives come to hammer out deals to import cars or export coffee, is guarded by dozens of soldiers in combat fatigues.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Singer Jones turns actress

Singer Jones turns actress


Singer Jones turns actress

Actress-singer Norah Jones poses during a photo session at the 60th International film festival in Cannes, southern France, on May 17. Jones stars in the new film "My Blueberry Nights."
Chris Keeley

the life story that people themselves tell about who they are, and why.

Mental resilience relies in part on exactly this kind of autobiographical storytelling, moment to moment, when navigating life’s stings and sorrows. 

Otto Steininger

This Is Your Life (and How You Tell It)

For more than a century, researchers have been trying to work out the raw ingredients that account for personality, the sweetness and neuroses that make Anna Anna, the sluggishness and sensitivity that make Andrew Andrew. They have largely ignored the first-person explanation — the life story that people themselves tell about who they are, and why.

Stories are stories, after all. The attractive stranger at the airport bar hears one version, the parole officer another, and the P.T.A. board gets something entirely different. Moreover, the tone, the lessons, even the facts in a life story can all shift in the changing light of a person’s mood, its major notes turning minor, its depths appearing shallow.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Spy-camera watch from 1970

Spy-camera watch from 1970

Oh, for the golden age of spycamera watches: 1970, when spy-watches were as thick as a brick and twice and shiny:

This particular one is of the Quartz age, a 1970 SIPE LED digital watch with Steinheil 2.5/12mm lens, for 7 exposures on special cassette. Actually, it appears to be a Dynamic Scattering Liquid Crystal Display, the earliest form of LCD developed in the late sixties.
Link
Chris Keeley

Why the Six-Day War is still being fought

The Seventh Day

Why the Six-Day War is still being fought

Moshe Dayan at the Qalandia refugee camp, West Bank, 1967.

In June, 2003, President Bush tried to discredit any critics who dared dispute his artfully twisted intelligence assessments of Iraq by slinging the worst name he could think of: “Revisionist historians is what I like to call them.” This was intended as something more than a schoolyard taunt or an allusion to the sort of pseudo scholars who would deny, under a blizzard of footnotes, the existence of the Turkish massacre of Armenians. In the political context of the moment, it seemed a warning to all who would dispute the monarch’s version of reality.

Rigorous revisionism is, of course, at the heart of historical practice, and to practice it in the face of a state-endorsed orthodoxy can require a considerable measure of gall, as well as craft. No country easily accepts a figure like Charles Beard, who, as the avatar of the Progressive School of historians, informed Americans that the founders were wealthy landholders employing ideological trappings to garland their self-interest. But, without revision, what? Without Marcel Ophüls, who practices a filmmaker’s version of revisionist history in “The Sorrow and the Pity,” it would have been far easier for the French to go on ignoring their complicity in the deportation of Jews to the death camps. The assault on the American Indians; the ruthlessness of European colonialism in Africa; the decision-making process that led to Hiroshima; the reëvaluation of Presidential reputations—these are all, unendingly, fodder for “revisionists” who go on challenging accepted truths and complicating the story of the past.

Collapse )