May 7th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Right-Wing Nicolas Sarkozy Wins French Presidency, Thousands Protest in Streets of Paris

Right-Wing Nicolas Sarkozy Wins French Presidency, Thousands Protest in Streets of Paris

In France, conservative candidate Nicolas Sarkozy has been elected to be the country's new president. Sarkozy won a clear victory over Socialist rival Segolene Royal with 53 percent of the vote to her 47 percent. The estimated turnout of 84 percent was the highest in France in three decades.
Chris Keeley

Illustrated calendar from 1900: Antikamnia Chemical Company

Illustrated calendar from 1900: Antikamnia Chemical Company


Of all the wonderful things I've seen on the Bibliodyssey blog, this may just be the wonderfullest.

http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2007/05/antikamnia-chemical-company.html

Snip:

After beginning his working life as a printer's apprentice, Louis Crucius (or Crusius) completed the necessary requirements to graduate as a pharmacist in 1882 and a doctor in 1890 in St Louis, Missouri. While he was studying he worked in a pharmacy and made humorous sketches that were placed in the window of the store. A collection of these drawings was published in 1893 ('Funny Bones'). He lectured in histology and anatomy and eventually came to be a Professor of Anatomy but died in 1898 from kidney tumours.

Although he gave most of his drawings away, Crucius sold a number of them to the Antikamnia ('opposed to pain') Chemical Company which had been established in St Louis in 1890. They produced antikamnia medicines containing the coal tar derivative, acetanilid, an anti-fever drug with pain relieving properties somewhat related to paracetamol, but which would be later shown to be a toxic compound not to mention addictive. Antikamnia was mixed with substances like codeine and quinine to enhance the pain relieving effects.

30 of the Crucius 'dance of death'-inspired drawings were used to make 5 years worth of Antikamnia Chemical Company calendars - between 1897 and 1901. They had a fairly aggressive marketing campaign in which the calendars (aimed at the medical fraternity) as well as postcards and sample packs were distributed to doctors in the United States and overseas.

Link to full post.



posted by Xeni Jardin

Chris Keeley

Exploring 400+ miles of flood-control tunnels beneath Las Vegas

Exploring 400+ miles of flood-control tunnels beneath Las Vegas
 
 
The alt-weekly Las Vegas CityLife has published excerpts from Beneath the Neon: Life and Death in the Tunnels of Las Vegas , a new book by local journalist Matt O'Brien depicting his exploration of some of the 400+ miles of flood-control tunnels and storm drains that can be found beneath the glitzy lights of Las Vegas. Link.

"I follow the footsteps of a psycho killer. I two-step under the MGM Grand at 3 in the morning. I chase the ghosts of Benny Binion, Bugsy Siegel, Elvis, Frank Sinatra and Howard Hughes. I learn how to make meth, that art is most beautiful where it's least expected and that there are no pots of gold under the neon rainbow."

The second excerpt (located at a separate URL) describes his encounter with a homeless man living in dank tunnel near the airport, who has fashioned himself an elevated bed that manages to stay above the water line even during major flooding.

 

Photo by Bill Hughes, courtesy of Las Vegas CityLife.

posted by Xeni Jardin

http://www.lasvegascitylife.com/articles/2007/05/03/news/cover/iq_13874722.txt

 


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Chris Keeley

Yayoi Kusama: From Here to Infinity

Yayoi Kusama: From Here to Infinity

Eye Yayoi Kusama... Eye (1989, Acrylic on canvas, Signed and dated verso: "1989 Yayoi Kusama"). From the exhibition Yayoi Kusama: From Here to Infinity at Barbara Mathes Gallery. "...Since the mid-1950s, Yayoi Kusama has rigorously explored themes of obsession, accumulation, and repetition through an extensive body of work dominated by a compulsive use of dots, nets and biomorphic shapes. In 1958, Kusama moved from Tokyo to New York where she became acquainted with Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman. In light of these diverse influences, Kusama's style resists strict categorization and incorporates elements of Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimalism, Feminism, and Performance Art."

http://www.bmathesgallery.com/exhibitions/2007_4_yayoi-kusama-from-here-to/
Chris Keeley

Portraits from the Edge of Europe

Portraits from the Edge of Europe

Circus Performers Nelson Hancock... Circus Performers. From Portraits from the Edge of Europe - photographs by Nelson Hancock at Nelson Hancock Gallery
in Brooklyn, NY. "...These portraits were made in the 1990s along the rapidly changing, eastern edges of Europe. In cities such as Crakow, Prague, Moscow, Bratislava, Budapest, Istanbul and in the countryside surrounding them." Also... don't miss the Holga Photographs by Laura Miller.

http://www.nelsonhancockgallery.com/artists/nelson-hancock.html
Chris Keeley

(no subject)

http://carengoldenfineart.com/primetime/currentshow.htm

Prime Time: Shinique Smith and Mickalene Thomas

Prime Time: Shinique Smith and Mickalene Thomas at Caren Golden Fine Art in New York, NY. "...Caren Golden Fine Art is pleased to present Prime Time, a two-person exhibition featuring the work of Shinique Smith and Mickalene Thomas. Smith and Thomas have shown in numerous exhibitions together including African Queen and Frequency at the Studio Museum in Harlem, Do You Think I'm Disco? at the Longwood Arts Center in the Bronx and My Love is a 187 at the Luggage Store Gallery in San Francisco. Prime Time is an opportunity to further explore the nuances of their individual working processes. Addressing different aspects of contemporary culture, both artists layer color, pattern and texture in their use of found objects and imagery. A mutual affinity for accumulation is a common thread that unites their disparate methodologies."

Chris Keeley

Bansky strikes again

Bansky strikes again

http://www.newyorker.com/online/2007/05/14/slideshow_070514_banksy?slide=10

“The Elephant in the Room,” Los Angeles, 2006. An eight-thousand-pound elephant named Tai adorned with red and gold paint to match the wallpaper of a parlor. (The elephant in the room, a handout proclaimed, was global poverty.) Animal-rights activists were outraged, claiming that the paint was toxic. Los Angeles’s general manager of animal services eventually ordered the animal scrubbed down.

Chris Keeley

Chris Burden and the limits of art.

Chris Burden and the limits of art.

Documentation of two of Burden’s early pieces: “Shoot,” top, from 1971, and “Trans-fixed,” from 1974.

by Peter Schjeldahl

An efficient test of where you stand on contemporary art is whether you are persuaded, or persuadable, that Chris Burden is a good artist. I think he’s pretty great. Burden is the guy who, on November 19, 1971, in Santa Ana, California, produced a classic, or an atrocity (both, to my mind), of conceptual art by getting shot. “Shoot” survives in desultory black-and-white photographs with this description: “At 7:45 P.M. I was shot in the left arm by a friend. The bullet was a copper jacket .22 long rifle. My friend was standing about fifteen feet from me.” Why do such things? “I wanted to be taken seriously as an artist,” Burden explained, when I visited him recently at his studio in a brushy glen of Topanga Canyon, where he lives with his wife, the sculptor Nancy Rubins. “The models were Picasso and Duchamp. I was most interested in Duchamp.” Burden is a solidly fleshy, amicable man, given to arduous enthusiasms.

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Chris Keeley

In Sanskrit, “yoga” means “union.” Indians believe in a universal mind — brahman — of which we are a

In Sanskrit, “yoga” means “union.” Indians believe in a universal mind — brahman — of which we are all a part, and which ponders eternally. 


decided that replication was the sincerest form of flattery.

If padmasana — a k a the lotus position — belongs to all mankind

India has given the world yoga for free

If the copying of Western drugs is illegal, so should be the patenting of yoga. It is also intellectual piracy, stood on its head.

Chris Keeley

Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. In place of his usual garb — baggy cargo pants, T-shirt and sneake

Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. In place of his usual garb — baggy cargo pants, T-shirt and sneakers — he was done up in a traditional hakama, his hair pulled back in a neat bun, with his signature round glasses and wispy goatee. 

Tranquillity of the Heart, Torment of the Flesh,” includes new paintings of the founder of Zen Buddhism.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/07/arts/design/07mura.html

Smiles and FlowersSlide Show

Smiles and Flowers