April 30th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Coachella, pt. 3: plastic crunch, raver cruft, ghosts of desert past.

Coachella, pt. 3: plastic crunch, raver cruft, ghosts of desert past.


(Photos: crowd above, security chart below, by eecue of blogging.la, more here, cc-licensed).

I've been posting Coachella notes (one, two) to BoingBoing between band sets, from inside my buddy Wayne's biodiesel tour bus.

I hear there are several temporary cell towers on-site while the event lasts, to keep the voice, data, and SMS service moving. So unlike other desert events (say, Burning Man), phones are everywhere at Coachella, in-hand.

People walk while txting, wandering from stage to stage with eyes fixed on display. Fans hold them up during night performances, to snap photos or video or pay tribute by beaming display-light back at the band.

Stepping between tight rows of cross-legged attendees, waiting for one act to go on, I smell weed. I glance down, looking for the source glow. But all I can make out are luminous Sidekicks, fingers punching out txts, blotting out glow in staccato code.

We watched one superstar techno headliner play earlier tonight, to a packed field under black sky.

When the music ended and those tens of thousands of fans exited, a chorus of crinkly, plasticky sound rose from beneath all those feet.

Stomp, crunch, crackle; flattened water bottles and brittle glowsticks.

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  • posted by Xeni Jardin

  • Chris Keeley

    (no subject)

    Bjork, 41, describes “Volta” as “techno voodoo,” “pagan,” “tribal” and “extroverted.




    Audio Bjork on the Tribal Aspects of "Volta" (mp3)
    Audio Music Excerpt: "Wanderlust" (mp3)

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/29/arts/music/29pare.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

    an album that mingles programmed beats, free-jazz drumming, somber brass ensembles, African music, a Chinese lute and Bjork’s ever-volatile voice. It’s a 21st-century assemblage of the computerized and the handmade, the personal and the global. “This relentless restlessness liberates me,” Bjork sings in “Wanderlust,” which she calls the album’s manifesto. “I feel at home whenever the unknown surrounds me.”

    Drawing Restraint 9,” a film by her husband, the multimedia artist Matthew Barney; she said she heard more possibilities than she could use in the film. “Volta” also rejoins her, in some songs, with a big beat. “It’s like I’ve got my body back, all the muscles and all the blood and all the bones,” she said. “It is definitely in your face, but I feel it overall as being quite happy.”

    Chris Keeley

    Novak on Hagel--WashPost 4/30/07

    *Hagel's Stand
    *
    By Robert D. Novak
    Monday, April 30, 2007; A15

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/29/AR2007042901562.html
    *Sen. Chuck Hagel*
    <http://projects.washingtonpost.com/congress/members/h001028/>* returned
    from his fifth visit to Iraq to become one of two Republicans to join
    Senate Democrats in voting Thursday to **begin withdrawal*
    <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/26/AR2007042602469.html>*
    of U.S. troops. It was not an easy vote for a conservative GOP regular
    and faithful supporter of President George W. Bush's other policies. A
    few days earlier, Hagel sat down with me and painted a bleak picture of
    the war and U.S. policy.*

    *
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    Chris Keeley

    Woolsey disgraces himself again

    Woolsey disgraces himself again

    From Ray Close :

    Dear Friends:

    Former CIA Director James Woolsey gave a talk at Princeton University
    last week.  I decided not to attend, fearing that I might be unable to
    restrain myself from causing an ugly scene.  But I am extremely pleased
    and proud to forward to you a letter written to the campus newspaper the
    next morning by a young Princeton sophmore (a girl, presumabnly 18 or 19
    years old) protesting Mr. Woolsey's speech in very strong and eloquent
    language.  I have written to her expressing my admiration and
    appreciation
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    Chris Keeley

    Wolfowitz Decries 'Smear Campaign'

    Wolfowitz Decries 'Smear Campaign'

    Filed at 2:16 p.m. ET

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz on Monday decried what he called a ''smear campaign'' against him and told a special bank panel that he acted in good faith in securing a promotion and pay raise for his girlfriend. He reiterated that he had no plans to resign, and President Bush gave him a fresh endorsement.

    In a prepared statement to the panel, Wolfowitz said the institution's ethics committee had access to all the details surrounding the arrangement involving bank employee Shaha Riza, ''if they wanted it.''

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    Chris Keeley

    Most of his friends from this period had no idea of the wreckage caused by Mr. Zevon’s early alcohol

    Most of his friends from this period had no idea of the wreckage caused by Mr. Zevon’s early alcoholism. After years of hair-raising benders (many of them described in the book), he became sober for 17 years, only to be thrown off the wagon by a diagnosis of certain death. These last megabinges shamed Mr. Zevon and angered some of his new friends. “I said the one thing this guy should not do is die a cliché,” says the writer Carl Hiaasen, who worried that Mr. Zevon’s two children would have to read about their father’s fatal drug overdose in a newspaper.



    It Ain’t That Pretty, That Life of Zevon’s

    I'LL SLEEP WHEN I'M DEAD

    The Dirty Life and Times of Warren Zevon.

    By Crystal Zevon.

    Illustrated. 452 pp. Ecco. $26.95.

    One self-imposed epitaph Warren Zevon delivered after learning he had terminal cancer was this: “It’s a damned hard way to make a living, having to die to get ’em to know you’re alive.” Like so much of what he said, wrote and sang, it was quotable, savagely funny and true.

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    Chris Keeley

    The government charges that she provided $300-an-hour prostitutes to clients in the Washington area,

    The government charges that she provided $300-an-hour prostitutes to clients in the Washington area, operating the business by phone and e-mail from her home in California. An investigation begun in 2004 by the IRS and the U.S. Postal Service allegedly found that she instructed her escorts, whom she called "subcontractors," to convert her share of fees into money orders and mail them to a California post office box.

    Palfrey, who has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice and once studied law, served 18 months in state prison in the early 1990s after she was caught running a prostitution ring in California. She started her Washington business while on probation in that case.

    She told reporters, "I believe there is something very, very rotten at the core of my circumstance, and without money to hire my own investigators I must rely upon your acumen and talent . . . to uncover the truth." She refused to answer questions after reading her statement.

    Asked if he actually expects Tobias to testify in Palfrey's defense, Sibley said witnesses can be subpoenaed to testify and must then "show up and tell the truth."

    He rejected a reporter's suggestion that releasing the phone records amounted to blackmail.

    "I don't know why that's blackmail," Sibley said. "I call that due process of law." He added, "We don't have any options left."

    Chris Keeley

    The Black Panthers: Vintage Prints By Stephen Shames

    The Black Panthers: Vintage Prints By Stephen Shames 

    http://www.stevenkasher.com/html/exhibresults.asp?exnum=618

    The Black Panthers: Vintage Prints By Stephen Shames

    Shoot-Up at Panther Office in Oakland Stephen Shames... Shoot-Up at Panther Office in Oakland (1969, Vintage gelatin silver print). From The Black Panthers: Vintage Prints By Stephen Shames at Steven Kasher Gallery. "...At the tail end of the largely nonviolent Civil Rights Movement, Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded the legendary Black Panther Party in 1966 in Oakland, California. The Party, revered by some and vilified by others, burst onto the scene with a revolutionary agenda for social change and the empowerment of African-Americans. Its methods were so polarizing that in 1969, FBI head J. Edgar Hoover designated the organization as the country’s greatest threat to internal security.
    During the height of the Party’s activities, from 1967 to 1973, photographer Stephen Shames had unprecedented access to the organization. He captured not only its public face — street demonstrations, protests, and militant posturing — but also unscripted behind-the-scenes moments, such as private meetings held in the Party headquarters, scenes from the Panther schools and free meal programs, and Bobby Seale at work on his mayoral campaign in Oakland.
    Stephen Shames’s Black Panther pictures were taken while he was still a student at the University of California, Berkley. Their immediacy and intimacy connect less to the prevalent photojournalistic styles of the day, and connect more to the inside-view documentary styles of Danny Lyon and Larry Clark."



    Chris Keeley

    Snake Tamer's Ditty

    Happy Monday-


     
    © Amy Crehore 2007 -  Snake Tamer's Ditty - www.amycrehore.com

    Somebody said that my newest painting is cinematic
    because of the format.
    Here's the full version, if you didn't catch it
    on my blog. Please forgive me if you did.
     
    "Snake Tamer's Ditty", oil on linen
    It's my odalisque.
    The girl's pose is twisted like a snake.
    This one was very difficult to paint!
     
    Amy