April 26th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Letting him stay is not an option.”

treating him “shabbily and unfairly,” and appealed for more time to defend himself against allegations of favoritism and other matters.

Wolfowitz Escalates Battle to Stay at Bank

WASHINGTON, April 25 — Escalating his campaign to remain president of the World Bank, Paul D. Wolfowitz accused the bank’s board on Wednesday of treating him “shabbily and unfairly,” and appealed for more time to defend himself against allegations of favoritism and other matters.

Mr. Wolfowitz, increasingly isolated at the bank and facing a board seemingly determined to force his resignation, sent a letter to the head of a board panel dealing with issues affecting his leadership, asking to appear before the board next week in the interest of “fairness to me” and “good governance” at the bank.

The letter was described by people who had seen it.

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Chris Keeley

Soundgarden's "Jesus Christ Pose."

Considering he's spent 20 years belting out hard-edged tunes as a frontman for Soundgarden, Audioslave and Temple of the Dog, some wear on the pipes would be understandable

Chris Cornell holds his own as he goes solo with  

At Rams Head, No Rust On Chris Cornell's Pipes

Thursday, April 26, 2007; C02

 

At the start of Chris Cornell's Rams Head Live show Tuesday, the singer with the renowned rock-god voice sounded, as a certain "American Idol" judge would put it, "a bit shouty." Considering he's spent 20 years belting out hard-edged tunes as a frontman for Soundgarden, Audioslave and Temple of the Dog, some wear on the pipes would be understandable. Was this tour, which is promoting Cornell's second solo album, "Carry On," too much for the vocalist to handle?

It didn't take long to find out. Cornell warmed up in a flash, treating the sold-out audience to rich, jaw-on-the-floor performances of hits and deep cuts from throughout his career. Having split from his most recent group, Audioslave, because of "personality conflicts," Cornell looked comfortable with his tight backing band, to whom he frequently deferred applause after ace renditions of favorites such as "Like a Stone" and "Black Hole Sun," tracks from his new release (out May 1), and rarities such as "Sunshower," from the 1998 soundtrack for "Great Expectations." A cover of Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" was perhaps the one off note of the night, with the melody melding beautifully with Cornell's voice but the slowed tempo not translating as well.

The two-hour show closed with a double encore that ended with an electrifying extended version of Soundgarden's "Jesus Christ Pose."

Technically complex with a metal sound, the song crescendoed with Cornell's gorgeous wails -- and this time the shouting was just right.

 

-- Tricia Olszewski

Chris Keeley

STREET MOUTH

Thurston Moore: Street Mouth at K.S. Art. 

http://www.ksartonline.com/tmex2.html



Images

KS ART presents New York-based artist Thurston Moore’s first one-person exhibition, Street Mouth. Although better known as the highly influential, experimental musician and co-founder of Sonic Youth, Moore has created a suite of photomontages which are razor-sharp visual equivalents of New York`s underground music and poetry scene around the late 1970s -- primarily joyful noisemakers circulating around CBGBs, Max’s Kansas City and St. Marks Church

Deploying collage techniques mashed up through a process described by the artist as “a kind of punk photoshop,” these brand new works re-purpose vintage press clippings, press photos, and correspondence culled from Moore`s own archive. The results are a compelling series of personal, urban daydreams, cast from a fan’s perspective. Familiar downtown faces include Iggy Pop, the Ramones, Lou Reed, Patti Smith, Allan Ginsberg, and Kathy Acker. Screaming fields of disjointed imagery and deeply saturated colors collide and overlap, yielding tales from the pulp crypt of a not-to-be-forgotten New York underground. Only rarely do musicians translate their sonic talents so fittingly and so refreshingly into the domain of visual art. 


Chris Keeley

The fact that these paintings were discarded does not mean that they are not of value.

Francis Bacon in his famously chaotic studio in 1980. Photograph: Jane Bown

Francis Bacon in his studio 1980
Francis Bacon

It's trash, but it's Bacon's trash - and it's sold for almost £1m

Painter's discarded works, diaries and bits and bobs rescued from skip by electrician create a storm in Surrey

Charlotte Higgins, arts correspondent
Wednesday April 25, 2007

Guardian

Nearly 30 years ago, an electrician called Mac Robertson working at Francis Bacon's studio in west London noticed the artist dumping rubbish in a skip. Something of a squirrel, and clearly no fool, he persuaded Bacon to let him keep these few discarded paintings, diaries, photos and bits and bobs. He hung on to the stuff, storing it in a friend's attic in Surrey.
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Chris Keeley

What becomes of our souls when we make war a business?

What becomes of our souls when we make war a business?

Lurking Beneath the Surface of Blackwater North

By Dan Kenney

The stillness of tree lined Skunk Hallow Road in Jo Daviess
County Illinois, twenty miles from the beautiful Palisades along the
Mississippi River, will soon be shattered by gunfire. Not the gun
fire of wild turkey hunters but the gunfire from a new training
facility for the most powerful mercenary army in the world,
Blackwater USA.
I had a view of Blackwater's new Illinois facility that is
usually reserved for the hawks circling overhead. I stood on-top
their climbing/rappelling/shooting tower looking down at the
bulldozers busy moving tons of earth to create more shooting ranges.
On eighty acres in this isolated corner of Illinois, one
hundred miles from Chicago, Blackwater is creating another large
training site. This site will eventually, according to Blackwater
North's vice deputy Eric Davis, compare to their headquarters in
North Carolina. They have a full schedule of classes ready to roll
beginning April 9th with a pistol shooting course that is already
three over capacity. The first three weeks of courses are filled and
the others are filling fast.
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