April 22nd, 2007

Chris Keeley

Campbell loves the “romance” of the now-gone two-fisted clamor of the Honolulu Chinatown district wh

he has been applying his aesthetic to household objects by way of a laser-etching machine, and formed his own creative agency, Mama Tried, so he can work with new clients “from the concepting stage,” consulting on a brand’s entire image, rather than just doing illustrations.



Campbell loves the “romance” of the now-gone two-fisted clamor of the Honolulu Chinatown district where Sailor Jerry made his name, when a tattoo was a mark of something quite the opposite of hip fashion.

Ink Inc.

The Tattoo Aesthetic

It has been several years since even Ozzy Osbourne could see that tattoos were overexposed: “To be unique, don’t get a tattoo. Because everybody else has got tattoos!” Yet despite the fact that tattoo imagery is everywhere — serving as the basis for reality shows, as a de facto part of N.B.A. uniforms and, increasingly, as an element in marketing — it retains its appeal as “an authentic and real part of culture,” one advertising executive recently informed The Chicago Tribune. What’s surprising about the popularity of tattooing is that it won’t seem to go away — that some tattoo imagery still seems authentic, even when it’s mainstream.

Scott Campbell learned the tattoo trade in San Francisco, starting at a “scratcher” shop there before spending several years in Europe and, eventually, New York. He studied the history and lore of tattooing, learning the classic, old-school styles of Norman (Sailor Jerry) Collins and others, and adding his own twists. In 2004 he opened his own shop, Saved Tattoo, in Brooklyn. Set up like a boutique, it has clients that include ad-agency art directors and people like Marc Jacobs and Heath Ledger. Still, Campbell loves the “romance” of the now-gone two-fisted clamor of the Honolulu Chinatown district where Sailor Jerry made his name, when a tattoo was a mark of something quite the opposite of hip fashion. “The stories are amazing,” he says. “You wish it was 1950 again — and you were that tough.”

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Chris Keeley

Spit truth to power,” the other 11 laws are familiar bromides that read like page filler churned up

The new book by the hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons discusses vegetarianism, yoga and financial literacy.



Spit truth to power,” the other 11 laws are familiar bromides that read like page filler churned up by Madison Avenue book packagers. They include: “Have a vision and stick with it,” “Never give less than your best,” “Surround yourself with the right people,” “There are no failures, only quitters” and “Successful people stay open to change.”

The Russell Simmons Guide to Success Through Spirituality

RUSSELL SIMMONS, is a hip-hop mogul who personifies what he calls the “Nu American Dream.” After a misspent youth that included a stint dealing marijuana, he went on to make his fortune producing hit records, music videos, television shows, movies and clothes. He owns mansions, fancy cars and all sorts of expensive toys.

But he says he isn’t blinded by the “bling bling.” And, as he puts it, he still likes to “chop it up” with people in both Harlem and the Hamptons.

Mr. Simmons’s new book, “Do You! 12 Laws to Access the Power in You to Achieve Happiness and Success” (Gotham Books, 320 pages, $25) is an obviously heartfelt, if often rather awkward, effort to share what he has learned so that other people can uplift themselves as he has done. Collapse )

Chris Keeley

This summer, Smashing Pumpkins — O.K., two of the four original members — will tour for the first ti

But there really is a lot of high-profile reuniting this summer: the Police will begin its first tour in 21 years. Genesis will tour for the first time in 15; Crowded House, 11; the Jesus and Mary Chain, 9; Squeeze, 8; Rage Against the Machine, 7; Smashing Pumpkins — if you count two of four members a reunion — 7. The members of the original Van Halen nearly made it to the starting gate for the first time in 22 years, but called their summer tour off in February.



This summer, Smashing Pumpkins — O.K., two of the four original members — will tour for the first time in seven years, one of several high-profile bands to do so.

Chris Keeley

a family that has faced society's most difficult social challenges: poverty, illiteracy, divorce, ch

Martin was convicted of selling 17.2 grams of cocaine to a government informant in two transactions. The informant turned out to be Martin's own cousin, Rufus Anderson, a recovering crack addict who was a key figure in the sting.

a family that has faced society's most difficult social challenges: poverty, illiteracy, divorce, child abandonment, drugs, crime, imprisonment.

Justice Thomas's Life A Tangle of Poverty, Privilege and Race

By Kevin Merida and Michael A. Fletcher
Washington Post Staff Writers
Sunday, April 22, 2007; A01

Drugs have been a persistent problem in Pin Point, Ga., a tiny rural settlement best known as the birthplace of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Neighborhood leaders tried everything to chase the scourge away -- a march, a warning sign along the main drag, even a pilgrimage by the local church congregation, which prayed for and sang hymns to the dealers one Sunday morning.

"The guys who were on the corner just walked away," said Bishop Thomas J. Sills, the pastor at Sweet Field of Eden Baptist Church. But they didn't stay gone.

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