April 17th, 2007

Chris Keeley

George Epps, 59, said that he entered expensive detoxification programs 20 to 25 times over several

With grim humor, some doctors in New York call them “frequent fliers” — addicts who check into hospital detoxification units so often that dozens of them spend more than 100 nights a year in those wards.

 

April 17, 2007

Revolving Door for Addicts Adds to Medicaid Cost

With grim humor, some doctors in New York call them “frequent fliers” — addicts who check into hospital detoxification units so often that dozens of them spend more than 100 nights a year in those wards.

Through its Medicaid program, New York spends far more than other states on drug and alcohol treatment, including more than $300 million a year paid to hospitals for more than 30,000 detox patients. One reason for the high cost is that $50 million is spent just on the 500 most expensive patients, at a cost of about $100,000 a person. These patients check in and out of detox wards, on average, more than a dozen times a year — a practice that experts say would not be tolerated in most states.

In the state’s 2004 fiscal year, one patient was admitted to such units 26 times at 17 different hospitals around New York City, spending a total of 204 nights, Medicaid records show. In fiscal year 2005, there was one patient who spent 279 nights in detox wards, at a cost of about $300,000.

New York State spends more than enough money to provide all the needed treatment, but “the dollars are being spent in the wrong settings,” said Deborah S. Bachrach, the state’s Medicaid director.

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Chris Keeley

It's a question that's been posed to social movements for years. We know what you oppose, but what's

It's a question that's been posed to social movements for years. We know what you oppose, but what's your alternative? Michael Albert is considered one of today's leading thinkers on that very question. He has been writing and speaking on his concept of an economic and social vision for decades. Albert is founder of Z Magazine and its sister website Znet, as well as co-founder of South End Press. [includes rush transcript - partial]

 

He is the author of numerous books, including "Parecon: Life After Capitalism" and "Realizing Hope: Life Beyond Capitalism." His latest book is called "Remembering Tomorrow: From SDS to Life After Capitalism, A Memoir."

 

Chris Keeley

the Nixon-Kissinger phone call reacting to news of the 1973 coup in Chile that overthrew Salvador Al

This brilliant, devious duo is glimpsed in a moment of gloating camaraderie, even as Watergate was bringing the presidency down around them. History, Mr. Dallek said, resides in such details.

 

Parsing the Nixon and Kissinger Pas de Deux

WASHINGTON, April 16 — Robert Dallek sat in the National Archives day after day, mining the 20,000 pages of Henry Kissinger’s telephone transcripts for historical gold. And every so often, amid the blur of bureaucratic tedium, a little nugget would glitter. One was the Nixon-Kissinger phone call reacting to news of the 1973 coup in Chile that overthrew Salvador Allende, whose Socialist government they had worked covertly to undermine through the C.I.A.

Mr. Kissinger grumbled to the president that American newspapers, “instead of celebrating,” were “bleeding because a pro-Communist government has been overthrown.”

“Isn’t that something?” Nixon remarked.

“In the Eisenhower period, we would be heroes,” Mr. Kissinger said.

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Chris Keeley

despite profound differences in the two species, just a 1.23 percent difference in their genes separ

despite profound differences in the two species, just a 1.23 percent difference in their genes separates Homo sapiens from chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes.




Almost Human, and Sometimes Smarter

CHICAGO — Observed in the wild and tested in captivity, chimpanzees invite comparison with humans, their close relatives. They bear a family resemblance that fascinates people, and scientists see increasing evidence of similarities in chimp behavior and skills, making some of them think on the vagaries of evolution.

For some time, paleontologists and evolutionary biologists have known that chimp ancestors were the last line of today’s apes to diverge from the branch that led to humans, probably six million, maybe four million years ago. More recent examination shows that despite profound differences in the two species, just a 1.23 percent difference in their genes separates Homo sapiens from chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes.

And certain similarities between the two species, scientists say, go beyond expressive faces and opposable thumbs.

Chimps display a remarkable range of behavior and talent. They make and use simple tools, hunt in groups and engage in aggressive, violent acts. They are social creatures that appear to be capable of empathy, altruism, self-awareness, cooperation in problem solving and learning through example and experience. Chimps even outperform humans in some memory tasks.

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Chris Keeley

Western Australia´s Burrup Peninsula is the world's largest outdoor rock engraving site, containing

Western Australia´s Burrup Peninsula is the world's largest outdoor rock engraving site, containing rock art of world importance possibly dating back to 30,000 years ago, including possibly the first ever representation of the human face in history. Woodside Petroleum and the Western Australian Government are planning to turn part of this site into a natural gas production facility against the wishes of some of the site`s Aboriginal custodians and the scientific community.
 
 
 
 
(Psst! Please pass it on!)
Chris Keeley

The modern Thylacine first appeared about 4 million years ago. Species of the Thylacinidae family da

The modern Thylacine first appeared about 4 million years ago. Species of the Thylacinidae family date back to the beginning of the Miocene; since the early 1990s, at least seven fossil species have been uncovered at Riversleigh, part of Lawn Hill National Park in north-west Queensland.[3][4] Dickson's Thylacine (Nimbacinus dicksoni), is the oldest of the seven discovered fossil species, dating back to 23 million years ago. This thylacinid was much smaller than its more recent relatives.[5] The largest species, the Powerful Thylacine (Thylacinus potens) which grew to the size of a wolf, was the only species to survive into the late Miocene.[6] In late Pleistocene and early Holocene times, the modern Thylacine was widespread (although never numerous) throughout Australia and New Guinea.[7]

Illustration of the Powerful Thylacine, Thylacinus potens, which existed during the Miocene. It is the Thylacine's largest known relative.
Illustration of the Powerful Thylacine, Thylacinus potens, which existed during the Miocene. It is the Thylacine's largest known relative.

The Thylacine showed many similarities to the members of the Canidae (dog) family of the Northern Hemisphere: sharp teeth, powerful jaws, raised heels and the same general body form. This is an example of convergent evolution. Since the Thylacine filled the same ecological niche in Australia as the dog family did elsewhere, it developed many of the same features. Despite this, it is unrelated to any of the Northern Hemisphere predators — its closest living relative is the Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).[9]
Chris Keeley

I quit skating and then I started drinking when I was a teenager and then I quit drinking

I looked up “hands-on healing” on the Internet and read some of what hands-on healers do, that they move the energy in your body around and make you more balanced, clear the bad stuff out.

April 15, 2007
Lives

Feet to Brain

Let’s make this fast.I was molested when I was a child and then I wasn’t anymore and then I skated competitively as a kid and then I quit skating and then I started drinking when I was a teenager and then I quit drinking and then I started therapy when I was an adult and then I married and then I still had therapy and then I had children and then I still had therapy and finally I decided I was tired of all this therapy, all this talking like a talk machine.

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Chris Keeley

There’s a wealth of terrific photography shows in the city’s museums and galleries right now, but th

Vince Aletti

April 23, 2007


There’s a wealth of terrific photography shows in the city’s museums and galleries right now, but they’ll have tough competition this week from the sprawling exhibitions that auction houses mount in advance of their spring sales. Every house has something to brag about—a virtual Horst retrospective at Christie’s, “27 Exceptional Photographs” at Phillips—but Sotheby’s exhibition of works from the collection of Margaret Weston promises to be the smartest show in town. Weston, who opened her Carmel, California, gallery in 1975, shortly after her divorce from Edward Weston’s son Cole and long before there was an active market for her wares, is not merely a connoisseur. Her collection is full of extraordinary images by Weston, Cunningham, Evans, Man Ray, and other modernist masters, but it ranges marvellously wide, embracing everything from Carleton Watkins’s log-cabin landscape to Wanda Wulz’s Futurist still-life. Unlike many contemporary collections, Weston’s is not just savvy; it’s soulful—and bracingly, pointedly idiosyncratic.
Chris Keeley

one-word answer

From Ray Close

CounterPunch April 17, 2007

Capuano and Kucinich Come Clean About the Lobby

Why is the Peace Movement Silent About AIPAC?

By JOHN WALSH

"AIPAC!" was the forceful one-word answer of Congressman Michael Capuano when we asked him, "Why was the Iran clause forbidding war on Iran without Congressional approval taken out of the recent supplemental for the Iraq war funding?" I nearly fell out of my chair at his reply - not because this was news but because of who had just said it. Capuano is a close ally of Nancy Pelosi, her fixer and enforcer. That was last Friday morning when a small delegation from Cambridge and Somerville, MA, were visiting the Congressman, known for his bluntness, as part of the nationwide UFPJ (United For Peace and Justice) home lobbying effort during the Congressional recess.

Later that day, Dennis Kucinich made an appearance at Harvard, where he was asked the same question, the reason for removing the Iran provision. "AIPAC," I volunteered out loud. Kucinich looked my way and said, "Exactly." Again my chair almost failed to contain me.

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Chris Keeley

Lee Iacocca Speaks Out - Loudly

By Lee Iacocca




 Copyright C 2007 Lee Iacocca

 All right reserved.

  ISBN: 9781416532477



  Had enough?

>  Am I the only guy in this country who's fed up with what's happening?
 > Where the hell is our outrage? We should be screaming bloody murder.

>  We've got a gang of clueless bozos steering our ship of state right
 over a cliff, we've got corporate gangsters stealing us blind, and we

>  can't even clean up after a hurricane much less build a hybrid car.
 But instead of getting mad, everyone sits around and nods their heads

>  when the politicians say, "Stay the course."

>

>  Stay the course? You've got to be kidding. This is America, not the
damned Titanic. I'll give you a sound bite: Throw the bums out!

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