April 16th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Artomatic Unveiled

Artomatic Unveiled

You'll find paintings, sculpture, short films and live music at Artomatic, the anything-goes arts festival.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/artsandliving/museums/features/2007/artomatic/index.html?hpid=cityguide

Painters, sculptors, filmmakers and fire-breathers: all are welcome at Artomatic, a freewheeling arts festival in Crystal City from April 13 until May 20.
Wine on Wednesdays

As an added incentive for a weekday visit, Dean and Deluca hosts wine tastings at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays.

Peeps for Your Peepers

Entries from the Sunday Source's Peeps Diorama Contest are on view at Artomatic. PHOTOS: Peep Show.

Chris Keeley

Time for Mr. Wolfowitz to Go

Time for Mr. Wolfowitz to Go

The reason Paul Wolfowitz should resign as president of the World Bank has nothing to do with Iraq, or his last job as No. 2 in Donald Rumsfeld’s Pentagon, or even his clashes with the bank’s directors and staff. He should resign because he made clean governance his main cause at the bank and has fallen far short of his own standards.

The facts are not in dispute. When Mr. Wolfowitz was appointed he was in a personal relationship with a woman employed there. Since working under Mr. Wolfowitz’s supervision would violate the bank’s conflict-of-interest rules, she was reassigned to the State Department, where she initially worked under Liz Cheney, the vice president’s daughter.

She remained on the bank’s payroll, and it now turns out that Mr. Wolfowitz helped arrange for her to receive a whopping $60,000 raise. Mr. Wolfowitz has launched a full rearguard action, apologizing to the staff, pledging full cooperation with any investigation, and appealing to staff members not to hold his “previous job” against him.

The issue isn’t his previous job. Mr. Wolfowitz had already created enough turmoil in his current job to raise serious questions about his stewardship. The directors and the staff were especially incensed about the cavalier way in which he pursued his anticorruption agenda, paying little heed to anyone save a tight circle of advisers he brought in with him. What might Mr. Wolfowitz himself say if he discovered that a government receiving World Bank loans was making similar sweet arrangements for the personal friends of its president? There is no way Mr. Wolfowitz can recover his credibility and continue to be effective at the bank.

Chris Keeley

A New Deal for the Mentally Ill (6 Letters)

A New Deal for the Mentally Ill (6 Letters)

To the Editor:

In “When the Cure Is Not Worth the Cost” (Op-Ed, April 11), Maia Szalavitz says “providing equal coverage for mental and physical illnesses sounds like a good idea,” but only if “mental health parity is tied to evidence-based treatment.”

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Calvin Tomkins profiles the artist Jeff Koons

Calvin Tomkins profiles the artist Jeff Koons

http://www.newyorker.com/online/2007/04/23/slideshow_070423_koons?slide=1

COURTESY JEFF KOONS

“Triple Elvis” (2007)
Oil on canvas
102 x 138 inches



COURTESY JEFF KOONS

“Rabbit” (1986)
Stainless steel
41 x 19 x 12 inches


COURTESY JEFF KOONS

“Michael Jackson and Bubbles” (1988)
Porcelain/ceramic blend
42 x 70.5 x 32.5 inches


COURTESY JEFF KOONS

“Train” (planned completion 2009)
Operational replica of 1943 Baldwin 2900 class steam locomotive in stainless steel and aluminum, Liebherr LR 1750 lattice boom crane
160 x 141 x 29 feet

http://www.newyorker.com/online/2007/04/23/slideshow_070423_koons?slide=1

Chris Keeley

all the bombshells who've struck a playful pose in the new retro style

an up-and-coming actress in a 50s-style pinup shot.

http://www.vanityfair.com/fame/features/2007/05/vanities_portfolio200705?slide=1

Mary Elizabeth Winstead

December 2006: Mary Elizabeth Winstead
Abbie Cornish

October 2006: Abbie Cornish
Isla Fisher

November 2006: Isla Fisher
Rachael Taylor

May 2007: Rachael Taylor

http://www.vanityfair.com/fame/features/2007/05/vanities_portfolio200705?slide=1
all the bombshells who've struck a playful pose in the new retro style



Chris Keeley

The bank's staff association has criticized his management and last week called for his resignation.

While negotiating his contract, Wolfowitz declared the conflict of interest and offered to recuse himself from all personnel dealings with the woman the bank has since called his "domestic partner," Shaha Riza. The board's ethics committee determined that bank rules required her to leave, while remaining on the bank payroll, and instructed Wolfowitz to arrange a compensation package through the human resources department.

The bank's staff association has criticized his management and last week called for his resignation.

Sources close to the executive directors, speaking on the condition of anonymity while the matter remains undecided, said the board is reluctant to appear to cave to the staff and take the unprecedented step of firing a president. But a majority believes it would be "best if he decided on his own" to resign, one source said.

The board has "clear support from political authorities" -- the finance ministers who make up the bank's governing body -- "to go ahead and define whether a violation has taken place" and what the consequences should be, the source said. But the board has set no timetable for a decision. "For one thing, the United States has to find someone as a replacement. It's not something you decide overnight."

The U.S. president traditionally names the World Bank head. Bush said last week that he strongly supports Wolfowitz and expects him to continue in the job.

One problem the board faces in considering Wolfowitz's case is its own role. While negotiating his contract, Wolfowitz declared the conflict of interest and offered to recuse himself from all personnel dealings with the woman the bank has since called his "domestic partner," Shaha Riza. The board's ethics committee determined that bank rules required her to leave, while remaining on the bank payroll, and instructed Wolfowitz to arrange a compensation package through the human resources department.

The package Wolfowitz dictated resulted in an increased pay grade, substantial raises -- from $132,660 when Riza left the bank to a current $193,590 -- and promotions upon her eventual return, but the board showed no further interest in learning the terms of the deal.

"I'm amazed that the ethics committee had a lot of views, but then stepped back from their implementation," said Ruth Wedgwood, a professor of international law at Johns Hopkins University. Turning the matter over to Wolfowitz to resolve in the first place, she noted, was "sort of oxymoronic: 'You can't recuse yourself enough to suit us, but we want you to be formally in the chain of command to resolve this.' "

Chris Keeley

Monday, April 16, 2007

http://neurophilosophy.wordpress.com/2007/04/16/lsd-discovered-on-this-day-64-years-ago/

Monday, April 16, 2007

LSD discovered on this day 64 years ago

Filed under: Books — MC @ 12:46 pm

albert_hofmann.jpgOn this day in 1943, Albert Hofmann, a chemist working for the Swiss pharmaceutical company Sandoz, discovered the psychedelic properties of LSD. In his autobiography, LSD: My Problem Child, Hofmann explains how he accidentally ingested the drug while synthesizing it in the laboratory:

It seemed to have resulted from some external toxic influence; I surmised a connection with the substance I had been working with at the time, lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate. But this led to another question: how had I managed to absorb this material? Because of the known toxicity of ergot substances, I always maintained meticulously neat work habits. Possibly a bit of the LSD solution had contacted my fingertips during crystallization, and a trace of the substance was absorbed through the skin. If LSD-25 had indeed been the cause of this bizarre experience, then it must be a substance of extraordinary potency. There seemed to be only one way of getting to the bottom of this. I decided on a self-experiment.

Collapse )

(via Wired)

http://neurophilosophy.wordpress.com/2007/04/16/lsd-discovered-on-this-day-64-years-ago/

Chris Keeley

While Nathan is at the office, Mr. Kaplan conducts “feeling checks” to find out how his client is fe

Mr. Kaplan loosely follows the spiritual foundation laid out by the Alcoholics Anonymous 12-step program. He meets Nathan at his house each morning for an hour of prayers, meditation and reading from self-help books like “Addiction and Grace.”



A Companion to Protect Addicts From Themselves

LOS ANGELES

HE is 36 and successful, the owner of a high-tech company who also finances music and film productions. But sometimes, in the middle of the night, he’s assaulted by nightmares and cold sweats. That’s when he reaches for the phone to call Ronnie Kaplan.

“I get there and I sit him down and relax his mind,” Mr. Kaplan said. “I ask him ‘What brought this on?’ It’s always something.” Once they figure out the trigger, “It’s over.”

“It” is the drug craving. The businessman is a drug addict, and Mr. Kaplan is a sober companion, a combination big brother, baby sitter and spiritual guide who uses motivation, prayer and exercise to keep his clients away from alcohol and drugs.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

The Canadian singer and songwriter Leslie Feist, who performs and records simply as Feist, is about

Feist’s third album of new material, “The Reminder” is due for release May 1. It’s the album that should transform her from the darling of the indie-rock circuit to a full-fledged star, and do it without compromises. “The Reminder” is a modestly scaled but quietly profound pop gem: sometimes intimate, sometimes exuberant, filled with love songs and hints of mystery.



The Canadian singer and songwriter Leslie Feist, who performs and records simply as Feist, is about to release her third album of new material.