April 14th, 2007

Chris Keeley

A Hunger For Justice

Jay McGinley, the vice president of a software firm 10 years ago, stands vigil and fasts to protest the world's inaction in Darfur, Sudan.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/13/AR2007041302195.html?hpid=artslot

Jay McGinley, the vice president of a software firm 10 years ago, stands vigil and fasts to protest the world's inaction in Darfur, Sudan.

A few hundred yards away from a statue of Mahatma Gandhi on Massachusetts Avenue, 55-year-old Start Loving, a former business executive known to his friends and family as Jay McGinley, lives on the sidewalk in front of the Sudanese Embassy, a month into surviving on nothing but water and the will to stir the world into stopping genocide. Bearded, sunburned and dirty from weeks on the street, he could be another homeless wretch -- except that hanging like wings off his shoulders are two giant laminated orange placards that read "Darfur Hunger Strike March 1.

A Hunger For Justice

Darfur Becomes One Man's Cause for Deprivation

Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, April 14, 2007; Page C01

Forty-four days without food and counting, and he thinks his mind is starting to slow. There are days he is so nauseated, he can barely move. His legs, he says, have swelled up from a problem with his kidneys. His body doesn't give off heat anymore. But his resolve -- his heart, he would say -- hasn't faltered. If need be, he says, he'll take this to the end.