April 10th, 2007

Chris Keeley

*What the Arabs propose, and what they do not*

From : Ray Close

*What the Arabs propose, and what they do not*
Henry Siegman
Monday, April 9, 2007

The Arab peace initiative has been widely misunderstood, and
occasionally even deliberately misconstrued.

The initiative is not a road map providing a step-by-step approach to an
agreement between Israel and the Palestinians, nor does it demand of
Israel prior acceptance of certain Arab or Palestinian conditions.
It does not provide a framework for peace negotiations other than what
is already specified in the road map that Israel claims it fully
supports: Israel's return to the pre-1967 armistice line as the basis
for negotiations for alterations, if any, to that line; the location of
a capital of a Palestinian state in East Jerusalem; and a resolution of
the Palestinian refugee problem.

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Chris Keeley

Accused Cuban Airliner Bomber Granted Bail

Accused Cuban Airliner Bomber Granted Bail
New developments in the case of Luis Posada Carriles – the anti-Castro Cuban militant connected to the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner that killed 73 people. A federal judge has ruled Posada can be set free on bail. Posada is being held not on terrorism charges, but for naturalization fraud and making false statements. He snuck into the United States in 2005 and then lied about how he entered the country. The Bush administration has refused to extradite him to Venezuela or Cuba to stand trial for the airline bombing. Federal prosecutors are challenging the bail ruling. Posada’s attorney says he expects to see him freed next week.

Chris Keeley

Corbis, started by Bill Gates in 1989, owns millions of images, some of them kept underground in a f

Corbis, started by Bill Gates in 1989, owns millions of images, some of them kept underground in a former limestone mine in rural Pennsylvania. More Photos > 





The iconic photograph of Rosa Parks recreating her quiet act of rebellion on a bus in Montgomery, Ala

A Photo Trove, a Mounting Challenge

In some sense, the iconic photograph of Rosa Parks recreating her quiet act of rebellion on a bus in Montgomery, Ala., belongs to every American. But as a practical matter, it belongs to Bill Gates.

Anyone wanting to use that image in a book or on a Web site must first license it from Corbis, a corporation founded and owned by Mr. Gates, who is better known for starting Microsoft. The photo is among the 11 million prints and negatives in the legendary Bettmann archive, which Corbis bought in 1995.

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Chris Keeley

Christopher O'Riley: piano covers of Nick Drake

Christopher O'Riley: piano covers of Nick Drake

Several years ago, classical music virtuoso Christopher O'Riley translated the music of Radiohead for piano to amazing effect. He followed up two Radiohead cover albums, "True Love Waits" and "Hold Me To This," with a piano tribute to the late Elliott Smith, "Home to Oblivion." Now, O'Riley, has put his hands on the catalog of influential English singer/songwriter Nick Drake who died of an overdose of antidpressants in 1974 at age 26. Slated for release tomorrow, "Second Grace: The Music of Nick Drake," is absolutely magnificent. (This is a big week for O'Riley. Not only is this album coming out, but his NPR classical music program, From The Top, premiered as a TV show on PBS last night.) Drawing from Drake's studio albums and home recordings, O'Riley's transcriptions of Drake's performances are floating, evocative, sometimes minimalist, and always haunting. Second Grace is perfect for a dark and stormy night or a calm and dreamy afternoon. From a Pittsburgh Post Gazette article:
 Images P B000N6U1Cs.01. Sclzzzzzzz V42014599 Aa240 Asked if he sees a connection between the artists he's devoted full-length albums to interpreting, O'Riley says, "It's the same thing that draws me to Dmitri Shostakovich, a sense of dichotomy, a sense of irony, a sense of surface versus substance. For instance, with Radiohead, you have a song like 'No Surprises,' where a very pretty texture and harmony are propping up rather desperate if not suicidal lyrics. So the dichotomy between the surface beauty and the undersurface turbulence and despair -- those qualities are rife, I think, throughout the works of all three artists."
Link (Thanks, Howard Wuelfing!) 

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000N6U1CS/boingboing0e-20

Chris Keeley

Thomas Struth’s “Hermitage 1, St. Petersburg” (2005). The photographer trains his lens on museumgoer

Thomas Struth’s “Hermitage 1, St. Petersburg” (2005). The photographer trains his lens on museumgoers and sometimes is able to hang his observations in museum galleries

Art’s Audiences Become Artworks

Art’s Audiences Become Artworks Themselves

Thomas Struth’s show at Marian Goodman — rapturous, magisterial photographs of museum visitors standing before Velázquez in Madrid and looking at Leonardo at the Hermitage in St. Petersburg — culminates one of the memorable art projects of the last 20 years or so. For nearly that long, Mr. Struth has been making these pictures of people in museums. They’re looking at art, although you might say the real question is what they, and we, are seeing.

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Chris Keeley

loaded, voluptuous power that the mere expression of it sounds like a come-on — a little pungent, a

loaded, voluptuous power that the mere expression of it sounds like a come-on — a little pungent, a little smutty, a little comical and possibly indictable. 

 

the Center for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, concurs. “Sexuality is such a huge part of who we are. How could we not want to understand it?”

Birds Do It. Bees Do It. People Seek the Keys to It.

Sexual desire. The phrase alone holds such loaded, voluptuous power that the mere expression of it sounds like a come-on — a little pungent, a little smutty, a little comical and possibly indictable.

Everybody with a pair of currently or formerly active gonads knows about sexual desire. It is a near-universal experience, the invisible clause on one’s birth certificate stipulating that one will, upon reaching maturity, feel the urge to engage in activities often associated with the issuance of more birth certificates.

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Chris Keeley

A long criminal history

A long criminal history

John Rodriguez was born in Mexico and spent most of his life in Louisiana, Texas and California. His criminal history includes several drunk driving offenses and a conviction for dealing heroin.

His first brush with the law occurred in 1929, when he was stopped in Dallas on a traffic violation. After serving in the European theater in World War II, Rodriguez returned to California, where he was arrested in 1951 — at age 38 — on suspicion of robbery.

In 1957, he was arrested in the first of 10 drunk driving offenses. And in 1961, he was convicted of conspiring to possess and sell narcotics and of possessing heroin. He was sentenced to five years to life and was paroled in 1969.

Rodriguez was married four times and fathered nine children. As far as prison and parole officials know, he has little, if any, contact with his children, the oldest of whom is 72.

During his working life, Rodriguez was a cook, an interpreter and a delivery driver. He now spends much of his day lying in a prison hospital bed, though he takes pride in the fact that he still has some vigor left.

"I don't look like I'm old," he said. "There's a 70-year-old man here who looks older than me."

Inmate

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Chris Keeley

In his January 2003 State of the Union address, President Bush declared the infamous sixteen words:

In his January 2003 State of the Union address, President Bush declared the infamous sixteen words: “The British Government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa.” The claim was central to the administration’s claims that Saddam Hussein was seeking weapons of mass destruction and served as a basis for launching the Iraq invasion less than two months later. Bush’s declaration was based on an intelligence document that provided evidence about Iraq’s purchase of uranium from the African country of Niger. But there was one problem: the document was a fake. In a Democracy Now! broadcast exclusive, we speak with the authors of two explosive new books. Carlo Bonini is the Italian reporter who broke the Niger story. His new book is called “Collusion: International Espionage and the War on Terror.” Peter Eisner is a veteran foreign correspondent and is currently an editor at the Washington Post. His new book is “The Italian Letter: How the Bush Administration Used a Fake Letter to Build the Case for War in Iraq.
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Chris Keeley

Clarence John Laughlin

Clarence John Laughlin

Artist: Clarence John Laughlin, Title: The Eye That Never Sleeps - click to close window 

Clarence John Laughlin at Stephen Daiter Gallery. "...Clarence John Laughlin was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana but moved to New Orleans at an early age. Self taught in photography as well as wide range of other subjets he began his career as a freelancer, producing mostly architectual photos, and eventually moved on to work for such varied agencies as Vogue Magazine and the US Army Corps of Engineers. His work was influenced Eugene Atget and other historical purists who tried to capture a decaying urban landscape – for Laughlin his home city of New Orleans was the staging ground for many of his pictures and he spent most of his life photographing the area. Arguably the first surrealist photographer in the United States he often constructed elaborate stages and employed models, costumes, and props to create haunting abstractions." Also... Works by Clarence John Laughlin at Robert Miller Gallery.

http://www.stephendaitergallery.com/dynamic/artist.asp?ArtistID=13
Chris Keeley

Gary Kamiya: "Why the Media Failed"--Salon.com 4/10/07

Iraq: Why the media failed

*Afraid to challenge America's leaders or conventional wisdom about the
Middle East, a toothless press collapsed.*

*By Gary Kamiya*

Apr. 10, 2007 | It's no secret that the period of time between 9/11 and
the invasion of Iraq <http://dir.salon.com/topics/iraq_war/index.html>
represents one of the greatest collapses in the history of the American
media. Every branch of the media failed, from daily newspapers,
magazines and Web sites to television networks, cable channels and
radio. I'm not going to go into chapter and verse about the media's
specific failures, its credulousness about aluminum tubes and mushroom
clouds and failure to make clear that Saddam Hussein had nothing to do
with 9/11 -- they're too well known to repeat. In any case, the real
failing was not in any one area; it was across the board. Bush
administration lies and distortions went unchallenged, or were actively
promoted. Fundamental and problematic assumptions about terrorism and
the "war on terror" were rarely debated or even discussed. Vital
historical context was almost never provided. And it wasn't just a
failure of analysis. With some honorable exceptions, good old-fashioned
reporting was also absent.
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