April 7th, 2007

Chris Keeley

You never know. Anything happens in Sopranoland.

Bacala is salted codfish and it's an Italian delicacy.

You never know. Anything happens in Sopranoland.


The Sopranos: Final Season
Begins Sunday, April 8

Steven Schirripa
Bobby 'Bacala' Baccaliere, Author and TV Personality
Friday, April 6, 2007; 3:00 PM

Actor Steven Schirripa, aka Bobby "Bacala" Baccaliere on The Sopranos, author of "A Goomba's Guide to Life" and the upcoming "Nicky Deuce" and frequent guest on The Tonight Show, Don Imus and Spike TV's Total Nonstop Action Wrestling program, was online Friday, April 6, at 3 p.m. ET from Las Vegas, where he lives, to talk about the eagerly awaited return of the Emmy Award-winning crime series.

A transcript follows.

____________________

Boulder, Colo.: Hi Steve, Now that "The Sopranos" is done, will you be going back to your work in Vegas full-time? What does the future hold for you?

Steve Schirripa: No, I don't plan on going back. I'm still a consultant to the Riviera and I have been since I left. I'm a correspondent for Jay Leno, I have a show on Spike called "Casino Cinema" and I just made a deal with Nickolodeon to exec produce my kids' "Nicky Deuce" book to make it into a movie of the week. Plus a whole lotta other stuff in the fryer. We got a lotta stuff going on.

_______________________

Washington, D.C.: To what extent has the cast of "The Sopranos" been permitted to improvise their lines during the filming of an episode? Should we assume that every word we hear has been scripted in advance?

Steve Schirripa: Absolutely, positively. Not one word is improvised. It's 100 percent scripted ahead of time.
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Chris Keeley

His father was a full-blooded Seneca

Now, visitors to Clinton County Correctional Facility must know his state inmate number, 06-B-3437, to see him.

His father was a full-blooded Seneca



Fugitive Tells of Life on the Run

DANNEMORA, N.Y., April 3 — Seeing him sitting in a plastic chair behind prison plexiglass, it is hard for a visitor to imagine that Ralph J. Phillips, better known as Bucky, led hundreds of state police officers on a manhunt through the towns and backwoods of western New York for the better part of five months last year.

He has pleaded guilty to shooting three state troopers, one of them fatally, while he was on the run after breaking out of jail and has received a life sentence. Before the killing, Mr. Phillips had some supporters in the state’s Southern Tier who wore T-shirts bearing his name. Now, visitors to Clinton County Correctional Facility must know his state inmate number, 06-B-3437, to see him.

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Chris Keeley

COUNT ME IN’ Ryan McGinness, left, at his Manhattan studio with Jacob Lewis, who set his sights on t

Mr. Solomon, who is committing Pace to spend about $125,000 a year on rent and $250,000 on renovations for the third-floor gallery space, is betting big on his protégé.


It takes the same amount of time to sell a $100,000 painting as it does a $10,000 print, and sometimes it’s more effort because of the amount of work and education you have to do.”



Selling Himself and Prints, Too

THE e-mail message arrived in the middle of the night.

Jacob Lewis had barely slept in four days, so nervous was he about the message he was awaiting last month from the artist Ryan McGinness. He had spent two years trying to convince his boss, Dick Solomon, an owner of the Pace Prints gallery on East 57th Street, that opening a location downtown would enable the company to attract a younger breed of artist and collector.

Mr. Lewis arrived in New York five years ago from West Virginia with little more than some lithographs he had made in college and a few mayonnaise jars of beechwood moonshine. Since then, the mission to which he has hitched his star is selling the idea that limited-edition printmaking is not, as many collectors believe, making posters, but is an important form involving ancient and newfangled techniques to create original works that sell for reasonable prices. The downtown gallery and Mr. McGinness were part of his plan.

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Chris Keeley

After retiring in 1969, Mr. Deming became an official of the American Foreign Service Association, a

After retiring in 1969, Mr. Deming became an official of the American Foreign Service Association, and a strong opponent of the presidential practice of appointing ambassadors who were not career diplomats.

Olcott Deming, 98, Ambassador to Newly Independent Uganda, Dies

Olcott Hawthorne Deming, a career Foreign Service officer and the first American ambassador to Uganda after it gained independence from Britain in 1962, died on March 20 near his home in Washington. He was 98.

The death was confirmed by his son Rust Deming.

Mr. Deming was appointed ambassador to Uganda by President John F. Kennedy in January 1963; at the time, he was the American consul general in Kampala, the capital.

“He went there with the idea that Africa had the opportunity to develop functioning democracies,” said Rust Deming, who was ambassador to Tunisia from 2000 to 2003. “But during his three-plus years there, my father became quite discouraged because of the tribalism that emerged within Uganda and the breakdown of economic cooperation between Uganda, Kenya and what was then Tanganyika,” now Tanzania.

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Chris Keeley

Before an alarm was raised, 76 men managed to escape, but only 3 reached safety. Fifty of those reca

Before an alarm was raised, 76 men managed to escape, but only 3 reached safety. Fifty of those recaptured were shot in a field by the Gestapo.

Ian Tapson, 84, Dies; Helped Plan ‘Great Escape’

JOHANNESBURG, April 6 (AP) — Ian Tapson, one of the last survivors of a team of World War II soldiers who planned the 1944 escape from a German prison camp later immortalized as “The Great Escape,” died March 31 in Port Alfred, South Africa. He was 84.

His death was announced by Wally Vandermeulen, chairman of the Port Alfred branch of the South Africa Air Force Association.

The escape, which Mr. Tapson helped to plan but did not take part in, was recounted in Paul Brickhill’s book “The Great Escape” and in the movie of the same title.Collapse )

Chris Keeley

My parents and I are soul mates. We are cut from the same cloth, and nothing, not even death, can ch

She went on to explain that his victims were fellow drug dealers, as if that made it more palatable.



Modern Love
Never Tell Our Business to Strangers
By JENNIFER MASCIA

NINE years ago, when my mother suffered a minor heart attack, my father and I learned that for more than two decades she had been lying about her age. She was actually three years older than my father, not two years younger, as she had always said. Apparently sensing that her real age might be relevant to her treatment, she had given the nurse her actual birth date, and then my father and I saw it scrawled on her plastic hospital bracelet.

That my mother had maintained this deception for so long shouldn’t have surprised me. My parents were all about deception on a grand scale: false identities, hidden pasts, dark deeds. As an only child, I was mostly isolated with my parents throughout my childhood as we crisscrossed the country, went bankrupt three times and had run-ins with the law.

It was not a normal childhood, but what did I know of normal? My parents were my whole world, and I loved them. I was especially devoted to my father, who showered me with attention, sneaking candy under my pillow that my mother had forbidden me to eat.

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Chris Keeley

Another magnificent piece by Uri Avnery--4/7/07

Comment: Israel is touted by its supporters and defenders as "the only
democratic state in the Middle East." As Avnery points out, if Israel is
defined as "a Jewish state" then it cannot also be characterized as a
"democracy." That is an oxymoron, as he says. If it is a Jewish state,
then non-Jews, even if granted nominal citizenship, are not citizens of
a democracy. The proof is that anyone arriving in Israel who can prove
he is Jewish can immediately acquire citizenship. Whereas a Palestinian
who was born in that territory and who can trace his ancestry there back
many generations, is not allowed to set foot there, much less be given
citizenship. Why? Because he or she is not Jewish and therefore would
dilute the Jewishness of "the Jewish state." Here's what Avnery says, in
brief (read the rest):

The term "Jewish state" is nebulous. It can be interpreted in several
ways. When one adds the word "democratic", it becomes an oxymoron - if a
state belongs only to a part of its population it is not democratic, and
if it is democratic then it cannot belong to a part of its population,
even if they compose the majority.



Uri Avnery
7.4.07

Shalom, Shin Bet

RECENTLY, THE CHIEF of the Shin Bet declared that the "Israeli Arabs", a
fifth of Israel's population, constitute a danger to the state.

He requested permission for the General Security Service to act against
anyone who aims at changing the official designation of Israel as a
"Jewish and democratic state" - even if they use nothing but completely
legal means.
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