April 3rd, 2007

Chris Keeley

How Bogus Letter Became a Case for War

How Bogus Letter Became a Case for War
Intelligence Failures Surrounded Inquiry on Iraq-Niger Uranium Claim

By Peter Eisner
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, April 3, 2007; A01

It was 3 a.m. in Italy on Jan. 29, 2003, when President Bush in Washington began reading his State of the Union address that included the now famous -- later retracted -- 16 words: "The British Government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa."
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Chris Keeley

Criteria for Depression Are Too Broad, Researchers Say

Criteria for Depression Are Too Broad, Researchers Say
Guidelines May Encompass Many Who Are Just Sad

By Shankar Vedantam
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, April 3, 2007; A02

 

Up to 25 percent of people in whom psychiatrists would currently diagnose depression may only be reacting normally to stressful events such as a divorce or losing a job, according to a new analysis that reexamined how the standard diagnostic criteria are used.

The finding could have far-reaching consequences for the diagnosis of depression, the growing use of symptom checklists to identify those who may be depressed, and the $12 billion-a-year U.S. market for antidepressant drugs.

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Chris Keeley

Take Your Pills, and I'll Call You in the Morning

Take Your Pills, and I'll Call You in the Morning
Phone Therapy Plus Pills Lifts Depression Better Than Meds Alone, Study Finds

By Jennifer Huget
Special to The Washington Post
Tuesday, April 3, 2007; HE01

 

Can psychotherapists just phone it in?

A new study in which patients receiving psychotherapy for depression improved without ever meeting their therapists face to face may encourage some psychologists to consider telecommuting. The research spotlights the changing role of the telephone in psychotherapy, its potential to extend help to reluctant or hard-to-reach patients and its limitations as a therapeutic tool.

In the study of 393 patients diagnosed with depression and placed on antidepressant medications, most (77 percent) of those who also received periodic psychological counseling over the phone found their depression "much" or "very much" improved after 18 months, found Evette Ludman, senior research associate at the Group Health Center for Health Studies in Seattle, and colleagues. Of those who received medication without phone counseling, only 63 percent saw similar gains, according to the study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and published in the April issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

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Chris Keeley

Comment: Better Late Than Never. Book publication obviously delayed

Comment: Better Late Than Never. Book publication obviously delayed
this story being told in the mainstream press. If it had been published
a year ago, the Scooter Libby trial would have been a different story.
Today's Post also recounts our Supreme Court's miserable performance in
refusing to hear the Guantanamo Detainee Rights Case.

How Bogus Letter Became a Case for War
Intelligence Failures Surrounded Inquiry on Iraq-Niger Uranium Claim

By Peter Eisner
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, April 3, 2007; A01

It was 3 a.m. in Italy on Jan. 29, 2003, when President Bush in
Washington began reading his State of the Union address that included
the now famous -- later retracted -- 16 words: "The British Government
has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities
of uranium from Africa."
Chris Keeley

Three members of Alcoholics Anonymous — from left, Lisa L., Alexandra C. and Kelli G. — with nonalco

Three members of Alcoholics Anonymous — from left, Lisa L., Alexandra C. and Kelli G. — with nonalcoholic drinks at intermission.

 

Anonymous Is Prominent in Audience of This Play 

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/03/theater/03billw.html?adxnnl=1&ref=arts&adxnnlx=1175627933-C7A/xpj6hCbIZnVnOBg04A

When Lisa Reynolds saw “Bill W. and Dr. Bob,” the play about the inception of Alcoholics Anonymous in the 1930s that opened Off Broadway recently at New World Stages, something strange happened. After Robert Krakovski, the actor who plays the A.A. co-founder Bill Wilson, delivered the first line of the play — “My name’s Bill W., and I’m an alcoholic” — most of the audience spontaneously responded, “Hi, Bill.”

“That’s something that happens at 12-step meetings,” said Ms. Reynolds, who flew in from Minnesota, where she works at Hazelden, the 58-year-old alcohol and drug rehabilitation center. “Everyone laughed because we were at a play, but we were still responding to another human being’s admission to this disease.”

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Chris Keeley

Ono promised to collect all the Washington wishes and add them to her cache -- she claims to have mo

Ono promised to collect all the Washington wishes and add them to her cache -- she claims to have more than 100,000 collected from trees throughout the world. The papers will be incorporated into the artist's Imagine Peace Tower, which will be installed later this year in Iceland. Ono was vague about the structure's exact design and said it would be made of light.

Both the Peace Tower and the tree project are part of the artist's long-standing efforts to encourage public participation in artmaking and to promote worldwide peace and understanding. Ono began creating art around 1960.

http://www.welmoedlaanstra.com/

IMAGINE PEACE

By Yoko Ono

LOCATIONS

Wish Trees for the Tidal Basin at the Jefferson Memorial
Wish Trees for Anacostia, THEARC at 1901 Mississippi Avenue SE
Wish Tree for Washington, DC, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden at 7th and Independence Avenue SW, in the sculpture garden

Whisper a wish to the bark of the trees
Japanese Lantern Lawn, west of the Kutz Bridge at Independence Avenue and 17th Street, SW

This line is a part of a very a very large circle available at:
THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Avenue SE
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 7th Street and Independence Avenue SW
Provisions Library, 1611 Connecticut Avenue NW, Floor 2

IMAGINE PEACE billboard at the Verizon Center at 7th and G Streets, NW

IMAGINE PEACE poster available at:
THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Avenue SE
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 7th Street and Independence Avenue SW
Provisions Library, 1611 Connecticut Avenue NW, Floor 2

IMAGINE PEACE ad in March 29, 2007 issue of the WASHINGTON POST Express

People who cannot visit the Wish Tree project in Washington, DC, can mail wishes to

IMAGINE PEACE TOWER
P.O. Box 1009
121 Reykjavik
Iceland

Chris Keeley

Yoko in Washington

Yoko in Washington
Yoko Ono answers questions at a news conference following the dedication of the "Wish Tree for Washington D.C." at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden on April 2, in Washington.

Yoko in Washington