March 22nd, 2007

Chris Keeley

A glimpse at the weird weird world of the rich

http://newyorksocialdiary.com/nysd/thelist

A glimpse at the weird weird world of the rich

The New York Social Diary is a website about people of such fantastic wealth that they shouldn't really be considered members of the human species. It makes fascinating reading. My favorite part is called "The List," which features photos of the 100 or so most prominent socialites accompanied by fawning bios. The names of the socialites on the list are wonderful: Muffie Potter Aston, Topsy Taylor, Bunny Mellon.
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Topsy Taylor is the great-great-great-great-granddaughter of Moses Taylor, born in 1805, the son of John Jacob Astor’s business manager.

...

Topsy has a bearing and accent which speaks “uppah-clahss” New York, one of the last mid-Atlantic accents, the result, no doubt, of upbringing and schooling.

...

She has a vice. It is ice cream – a special brand which is imported from Wisconsin and which comes in a variety of flavors often spiked with large (really large) chunks of chocolate. At the end of the day, she makes herself an ice cream cone with one of them. She once sent me a few pints of various flavors of this ice cream (shipped in dry ice fresh to my door). I am not an ice cream addict but this turned me into one. I thanked her for my gift and asked her not to send anymore.

Link (Via omg blog)

http://newyorksocialdiary.com/nysd/thelist
Chris Keeley

LA Weekly covers Mark Ryden art opening

LA Weekly covers Mark Ryden art opening

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Holly Myers of LA Weekly wrote about Mark Ryden and his latest art exhibition (shown here, The Tree of Life, which sold for $800,000). There are several nice photos of his paintings in the piece.
"These pictures," [gallery owner Michael] Kohn remarks, "are just extraordinarily well painted. And they're weird enough to be interesting. I've noticed among my colleagues -- a lot of my colleagues out in New York, who deal with more conceptually based work -- that looking at Mark's work used to be a guilty pleasure. I saw them coming by my booth in the Miami Basel Art Fair and oohing and aahing over this extraordinarily seductive painting. This was not their normal fare but they liked it anyway. Now, little by little, it's shifting. A guy who bought one of the works in this show collects Diebenkorn and Thiebaud and John Currin and some contemporary photographers -- not just figurative work but mainstream contemporary work, and now that also includes Mark Ryden. Now people can finally do it guilt free."

That Ryden will get the attention of the art world is all but assured: He's simply too talented, too rigorous and -- more to the point -- too savvy an artist not to. More interesting, then, is the next question: What does it mean for a serious contemporary artist to be popular?

Link