March 16th, 2007

Chris Keeley

They saved my life," Felicia "Snoop" Pearson says of the producers of HBO's "The Wire" who hired her

They saved my life," Felicia "Snoop" Pearson says of the producers of HBO's "The Wire" who hired her to play a hardened street character very much like, and named after, her.




Playing the Role of Her Life on HBO

The Role of Her Life
Snoop Pearson Is a Killer on HBO's 'The Wire.' A Victim's Family Can't Bear to Watch.

By Teresa Wiltz
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, March 16, 2007; C01

 

BALTIMORE

The thing is, Felicia "Snoop" Pearson's life wasn't supposed to look like this. At all. Some folks think it shouldn't look like this. An eye for an eye, and all that that entails.

But on rare occasions, fate decides to indulge in a little rearranging of centrifugal forces, turning lives inside out and granting the object of its attention a massive, cosmic do-over. When this happens, it helps, of course, to have a face the camera craves, a compelling back story and a knack for making people want to help you.

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Chris Keeley

Plame hopes to refute claims that her CIA work wasn't undercover

Plame hopes to refute claims that her CIA work wasn't undercover


Plame hopes to refute claims that her CIA work wasn't undercover.

Valerie Plame, the Spy Who's Ready to Speak for Herself
Years of Silence Will End Today With Capitol Hill Testimony

By Richard Leiby and Walter Pincus
Washington Post Staff Writers
Friday, March 16, 2007; A01

 

She has been silent nearly four years. Today, the CIA officer whose unmasking fueled a political uproar and criminal probe that reached into the White House is poised to finally tell her own story -- before Congress.

Valerie Plame's testimony will have all the trappings of a "Garbo speaks" moment on Capitol Hill, with cameras and microphones arrayed to capture the voice of Plame, the glamorous but mute star of a compelling political intrigue. But while she hopes to clear up her status as an agency operative when her name first hit newspapers in July 2003, America's most publicized spy is unlikely to betray any details in open session about her mysterious career.

The reason: Plame remains gagged by the same secrecy rules that governed her 20 years as a CIA employee working overseas and at Langley in classified positions.

People close to Plame say her primary goal in testifying before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is to knock down persistent claims that she did not serve undercover. "She is so tired of hearing that," her mother, Diane Plame, said in an interview earlier this week.

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Chris Keeley

4-Year Anniversary of Rachel Corrie Killing

4-Year Anniversary of Rachel Corrie Killing
And finally today is also the fourth anniversary of the death of Rachel Corrie. On March 16, 2003, an Israeli military bulldozer crushed Corrie to death as she tried to stop the demolition of the home of a Palestinian doctor in the Gaza town of Rafah. Eyewitnesses said Rachel was sitting directly in the path of the bulldozer holding a megaphone and wearing a fluorescent jacket. She was 23 years old.

Rove, Gonzales Discussed Attorney Firings in Jan. ‘05
New evidence continues to emerge further implicating the White House in what has been called the politically-motivated firing of eight U.S. attorneys. On Thursday, ABC News revealed previously undisclosed emails showing presidential advisor Karl Rove and Attorney General Alberto Gonzales directly engaged in the process to force out the prosecutors as early as January of 2005. In one email, former aide Kyle Sampson says he and Gonzales spoke about replacing up to one-fifth of the ninety-three US attorneys.Sampson added they had discussed retaining “[those who] are doing a great job [and] are loyal Bushies.” In another message, Sampson wrote: “Due to the history, it would certainly send ripples through the U.S. attorney community if we told folks they got one term only... That said, if Karl thinks there would be political will to do it, then so do I.” Another email from a White House aide reveals Rove requested in-depth updates on the ongoing discussions over whether to fire the attorneys. The White House immediately backed away from its previous claim former counsel Harriet Miers initiated a plan to dismiss all 93 US attorneys. In a statement, the Justice Department said Gonzales “has no recollection” of discussing the firing of US attorneys while he was White House counsel. The disclosures have given new momentum to calls for Gonzales’s removal. Senator Chuck Schumer of New York said: “The odds are very high that he will no longer be the attorney general.”

Report: Gonzales Advised Bush on Blocking Wiretap Probe
As Gonzales continues to take heat over the attorney firings, a new controversy is emerging over his role in the administration’s handling of a Justice Department probe into the warrantless domestic spy program. Investigative journalist Murray Waas is reporting Gonzales advised President Bush on whether to shut down the inquiry shortly after he learnt his own behavior would likely be examined in the investigation. It is unclear what Gonzales advised, but President Bush took action to effectively sideline the case. Insiders say the blocked inquiry would have likely focused on Gonzales’s own role in authorizing the eavesdropping program while he served as White House counsel.

Mugabe: Western Critics “Can Go Hang”
In Zimbabwe, fifty opposition activists have been released from prison after prosecutors failed to appear at their court hearing. The activists were rounded up Sunday in a police crackdown on a mass protest. Several were badly beaten. Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai was released from the hospital earlier today. Meanwhile, President Robert Mugabe dismissed Western criticism of the protest crackdown.

    Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe: “Now when they criticise government that is trying to prevent that violence or to punish the perpetrators of that violence, then of course we take the position that they can go hang."
Chris Keeley

Former CIA officer Valerie Plame, left, and her husband, former ambassador Joseph Wilson, arrive for

Former CIA officer Valerie Plame, left, and her husband, former ambassador Joseph Wilson, arrive for a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington in this July 14, 2006, file photo. 


Plame: My Cover Was 'Recklessly' Abused

By MATT APUZZO
The Associated Press
Friday, March 16, 2007; 11:45 AM

 

WASHINGTON -- Valerie Plame, the CIA operative at the heart of a political scandal, told Congress Friday that senior officials at the White House and State Department "carelessly and recklessly" blew her cover to discredit her diplomat-husband.

Plame, whose 2003 outing triggered a federal investigation, said she always knew her identity could be discovered by foreign governments.

"It was a terrible irony that administration officials were the ones who destroyed my cover," she told the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

"

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Chris Keeley

Valerie Plame Wilson was sworn-in during a hearing on procedures for safeguarding classified informa

Valerie Plame Wilson was sworn-in during a hearing on procedures for safeguarding classified information



Plame Wilson Testifies on Hill on Leak

Filed at 11:45 a.m. ET

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Valerie Plame, the CIA operative at the heart of a political scandal, told Congress Friday that senior officials at the White House and State Department ''carelessly and recklessly'' blew her cover to discredit her diplomat-husband.

Plame, whose 2003 outing triggered a federal investigation, said she always knew her identity could be discovered by foreign governments.

''It was a terrible irony that administration officials were the ones who destroyed my cover,'' she told the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

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Chris Keeley

Rep. Kennedy: I was hooked on OxyContin

Rep. Kennedy: I was hooked on OxyContin

NEW YORK (AP) - Rep. Patrick Kennedy said Friday he sought treatment for an addiction to the painkiller OxyContin months before wrecking his car outside the U.S. Capitol last year.

 

 

NEW YORK (AP) - Rep. Patrick Kennedy said Friday he sought treatment for an addiction to the painkiller OxyContin months before wrecking his car outside the U.S. Capitol last year.

The Rhode Island Democrat told NBC-TV's "Today'' show that he felt great in his recovery from substance abuse and was determined not to let the disease "take its toll on me ever again.''

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Chris Keeley

Opening Remarks: Valerie Plame Testifies Before Congress

Opening Remarks: Valerie Plame Testifies Before Congress
House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Hearing on CIA Identity Leak

CQ Transcripts Wire
Friday, March 16, 2007; 11:51 AM

 

MARCH 16, 2007

SPEAKERS:

REP. HENRY A. WAXMAN, D-CALIF. CHAIRMAN

REP. TOM LANTOS, D-CALIF.

WITNESSES:

VALERIE PLAME WILSON,

[*]

WAXMAN: The meeting of the committee will come to order.

Today the committee is holding a hearing to examine how the White House handles highly classified information.

In June and July 2003, one of the nation's most carefully guarded secrets, the identity of a covert CIA agent, Valerie Plame Wilson, was repeatedly revealed by White House officials to members of the media. This was an extraordinarily serious breach of our national security.

President George W. Bush's father, the former President Bush, said, and I quote, "I have nothing but contempt and anger for those who expose the names of our sources. They are, in my view, the most insidious of traitors."

Today, we'll be asking three questions. One, how did such a serious violation of our national security occur? Two, did the White House take the appropriate investigative and disciplinary steps after the breach occurred? And three, what changes in White House procedures are necessary to prevent future violations of our national security from occurring?

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Chris Keeley

MEXICO CITY -- In the largest cash seizure in Mexican history, authorities confiscated $206 million

MEXICO CITY -- In the largest cash seizure in Mexican history, authorities confiscated $206 million in U.S. currency from a band of methamphetamine producers headquartered in a ritzy neighborhood here, officials said today. 


Stack of cash

Two of the seven people arrested at the home were Chinese, and authorities said the bust hinted at the vast scope of an illegal drug trade that links Mexico to Asia.

Authorities said the arrests came after an investigation that began in December, when authorities seized 20 tons of pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient in the production of methamphetamines, at the Mexican Pacific port of Lazaro Cardenas