March 15th, 2007

Chris Keeley

A scene from “Montana Meth,” one of the documentaries that make up HBO’s 14-part “Addiction” series.

A scene from “Montana Meth,” one of the documentaries that make up HBO’s 14-part “Addiction” series. 

 

When the Cravings Won’t Quit, Turn On the Camera

This just in from pseudoscience: Addiction documentaries contain an element that excites dopamine receptors, shuts down the frontal lobe and causes intense cravings.

Pseudoscientists don’t know yet whether drug-documentary addicts are hooked by the gruesomely thrilling scenes of tourniquets and needles, the photos of pre-Vicodin fifth graders or the promise of redemption through higher powers. But something definitely sets the brain reeling with manic questions: How could they fall so far? How could so many of us? Whom will addiction strike next, and will the culprit be the demon rum or the demon OxyContin?

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Chris Keeley

Political journalist Joe Conason joins us in our firehouse studio to discuss his new book, "It Can H

Political journalist Joe Conason joins us in our firehouse studio to discuss his new book, "It Can Happen Here: Authoritarian Peril in the Age of Bush." Conason writes, "For the first time since the resignation of Richard M. Nixon more than three decades ago, Americans have had reason to doubt the future of democracy and the rule of law in our own country

It Can Happen Here: Journalist Joe Conason on "Authoritarian Peril in the Age of Bush"

Wednesday, March 14th, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/03/14/1324202

Political journalist Joe Conason joins us in our firehouse studio to discuss his new book, "It Can Happen Here: Authoritarian Peril in the Age of Bush." Conason writes, "For the first time since the resignation of Richard M. Nixon more than three decades ago, Americans have had reason to doubt the future of democracy and the rule of law in our own country. [includes rush transcript]

 

 

AMY GOODMAN: It Can Happen Here.

JOE CONASON: Yes.

AMY GOODMAN: Why did

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Chris Keeley

Lelyveld, NY Review of Books, Carter/Apartheid (3/29/07)

*Jimmy Carter and Apartheid*


       By Joseph Lelyveld <http://www.nybooks.com/authors/7956>


         Palestine Peace Not Apartheid
         <http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=2181&sourceid=41397204&bfpid=0743285026>


         by Jimmy Carter

Simon and Schuster, 264 pp., $27.00


         Prisoners: A Muslim and a Jew Across the Middle East Divide
         <http://service.bfast.com/bfast/click?bfmid=2181&sourceid=41397204&bfpid=0375412344>


         by Jeffrey Goldberg

Knopf, 316 pp., $25.00


     1.

Perhaps an intrepid researcher will one day go through the many Internet
pages that make assertions pro and con on the question of whether
Israel's occupation of the Palestinian territories can properly be
assessed as "apartheid." Then we may be in a position to tell whether
the first polemicist to sling the term in the context of the West Bank
was a foreigner, a Palestinian, or, just possibly, an Israeli. Suffice
it to say, it wasn't Jimmy Carter, whose recent book, with its
unpunctuated title /Palestine Peace Not Apartheid/, has been high on the
best-seller lists for nearly three months despite—maybe, in part,
because of—the wrath his use of the term has provoked among Israel's
supporters. Not all of them have been as restrained as Abe Foxman, the
director of the Anti-Defamation League, who complains of Carter's "bias"
but avoids tossing the epithet "anti-Semite" at the president who,
nearly three decades ago, brokered the Camp David accord, which did more
to secure Israel's place and legitimacy in the region than all the
diplomacy that preceded or followed it.

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