March 4th, 2007

Chris Keeley

in 1977, Mr. Barnes — a former addict with a junior high education who made a fortune flooding black

His autobiography is dedicated to Guy Fisher, a former associate serving a life sentence in federal prison, with this unambiguous message: “When you finish the last page, I want you to look up, see where I put you and ask yourself, was it worth it? Ask yourself that every day until you die.”

Tyrone Dukes/The New York Times, 1977

Leroy Nicholas Barnes had a presence that gained him attention, good and bad, as a drug dealer in the 1970s.

His autobiography is dedicated to Guy Fisher, a former associate serving a life sentence in federal prison, with this unambiguous message: “When you finish the last page, I want you to look up, see where I put you and ask yourself, was it worth it? Ask yourself that every day until you die.”

March 4, 2007

Crime’s ‘Mr. Untouchable’ Emerges From Shadows

The 74-year-old man who used to be Leroy Nicholas Barnes, owner of 60 pairs of custom-made shoes, 27 full-length leather coats and more than one Mercedes-Benz, wears baggy Lee dungarees these days and drives to work in a used car he bought five years ago.

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Chris Keeley

Irish Bishops and Palestine/Israel (encouraging).

MAYNOOTH - 28 February 2007 - 300 words

http://www.kibush.co.il/show_file.asp?num=19629

*Irish Bishops call for justice in Palestine/Israel
*
*At a media conference in Dublin yesterday, Bishop Raymond Field, Chair
of the Irish Commission for Justice and Social Affairs (ICJSA), Bishop
John Kirby, Chair of Trócaire and Rev Dr Eoin Cassidy of the ICJSA,
launched a position paper /Palestine/Israel, Principles for a Just
Peace/ before a briefing meeting with the Minister for Foreign Affairs,
Mr Dermot Ahern TD.

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Chris Keeley

The photographer is in an intractable bind,” she said, citing Walker Evans and Diane Arbus as artist

The photographer is in an intractable bind,” she said, citing Walker Evans and Diane Arbus as artists who had been similarly criticized for exploiting those they photographed. “You can’t possibly please everyone.


Little Miss Barbecue Queen of 2003, an image from Dave Anderson’s book, “Rough Beauty."



Town Shows Its Face, if Not Its Reputation

VIDOR, Tex.

THE only thing that’s black and white in the book is the color of the photographs,” said Billy Hartman, a 37-year-old lifelong resident of this small town. “You couldn’t get anything out of the book as being prejudiced.”

Not all of Mr. Hartman’s neighbors are inclined to agree.

The book is “Rough Beauty.” The photographer is Dave Anderson, a former communications aide in the Clinton White House and “MTV Choose or Lose” tour manager. And the town is Vidor, population 11,440, whose labyrinthine back roads spread out from Interstate 10, about an hour and a half east of Houston.

The 2000 Census listed eight black residents in Vidor, or one-tenth of 1 percent of the population. It was the scene of a 1993 protest against an attempt to integrate a local housing project, and it is the hometown of James Byrd Jr., a black man who, the day after he moved out of Vidor, was dragged to his death in nearby Jasper. The town has a mystique both nationally and locally as a surviving bastion of the Ku Klux Klan. There hasn’t been a racially motivated incident in Vidor in years, yet when it’s mentioned, many Houston residents still respond with warnings, concern and jokes about white hoods.

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Chris Keeley

How We Get Hooked and How We Get Unhooked

By

Shenpa is the urge, the hook, that triggers our habitual tendency to close down. We get hooked in that moment of tightening when we reach for relief. To get unhooked we begin by recognizing that moment of unease and learn to relax in that moment.
Shenpa is the urge, the hook, that triggers our habitual tendency to close down. We get hooked in that moment of tightening when we reach for relief. To get unhooked we begin by recognizing that moment of unease and learn to relax in that moment.


http://www.shambhalasun.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1610&Itemid=247

You're trying to make a point with a coworker or your partner. At one moment her face is open and she's listening, and at the next, her eyes cloud over or her jaw tenses. What is it that you're seeing?
 
Someone criticizes you. They criticize your work or your appearance or your child. At moments like that, what is it you feel? It has a familiar taste in your mouth, it has a familiar smell. Once you begin to notice it, you feel like this experience has been happening forever.
 
The Tibetan word for this is shenpa. It is usually translated "attachment," but a more descriptive translation might be "hooked." When shenpa hooks us, we're likely to get stuck. We could call shenpa "that sticky feeling." It's an everyday experience. Even a spot on your new sweater can take you there. At the subtlest level, we feel a tightening, a tensing, a sense of closing down. Then we feel a sense of withdrawing, not wanting to be where we are. That's the hooked quality. That tight feeling has the power to hook us into self-denigration, blame, anger, jealousy and other emotions which lead to words and actions that end up poisoning us. Remember the fairy tale in which toads hop out of the princess's mouth whenever she starts to say mean words? That's how being hooked can feel. Yet we don't stop—we can't stop—because we're in the habit of associating whatever we're doing with relief from our own discomfort. This is the shenpa syndrome. The word "attachment" doesn't quite translate what's happening. It's a quality of experience that's not easy to describe but which everyone knows well. Shenpa is usually involuntary and it gets right to the root of why we suffer.
 
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Chris Keeley

When the members of the Arcade Fire, a Montreal art-rock band led by Win Butler and his wife, Régine

the band has seven permanent members and swells, when strings and horns are added, into an antic carnival orchestra. With the men in suspenders and vests and the women in dresses and lace fingerless gloves, and everyone employing yelps, hand claps, megaphones (for vocal distortion), motorcycle helmets (so they can drum on each other’s heads) and the occasional snare drum tossed high into the air, an Arcade Fire show has the feel of a Clash concert infiltrated by Cirque du Soleil.



When the members of the Arcade Fire, a Montreal art-rock band led by Win Butler and his wife, Régine Chassagne, were trying to find studio space to record their second full-length album, they took an inventory of their instruments — the hurdy-gurdy and the accordions, but also the baby-grand and upright pianos, the organ and the harpsichord, the xylophone and the Caribbean steel drums.
Chris Keeley

saw an ad for nude models. It had been posted by Boink, a glossy new sex magazine by and about colle

User-Friendly? Alecia Oleyourryk, a founder of the unblushingly lewd and "sex positive" Boink.


saw an ad for nude models. It had been posted by Boink, a glossy new sex magazine by and about college students founded by Alecia Oleyourryk, then a senior at nearby Boston University, and Christopher Anderson, a software consultant in his 30s moonlighting as a photographer



These days, when anyone can run a virtual media empire out of a dorm room, student-generated sex magazines, some with the imprimatur of university financing and faculty advisers, are becoming a fact of campus life. Their subjects and contributors are the gals — and guys — down the hall; their target audience is male, female, straight, gay and everything in between. Not all are as overtly titillating as Boink. The grande dame of the group is Squirm, a “magazine of smut and sensibility,” which has been circulating since 2000 at Vassar, once the inspiration for the awkward lunges and contraceptive pessaries of Mary McCarthy’s 1963 novel “The Group.” Topics considered within its pages have included bondage and sadomasochism, the history of the condom and the fluidity of gender. At Yale, there is the earnest, instructive SWAY, whose title is an acronym for Sex Week at Yale, a student-run symposium held biennially there since 2002, with administrative blessing and a corporate sponsor, Pure Romance, a company whose representatives sell sexual aids for women at Tupperware-like “parties.” The premiere edition included a slightly breathless interview with the porn star Jesse Jane along with an essay by the conservative Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D., a former Yale economics lecturer, which concluded: “Marriage is for lovers. Hooking up is for losers.” In 2004, H Bomb arrived at Harvard with slightly loftier intellectual aspirations: its founders, Katharina Cieplak-von Baldegg and Camilla Hrdy, positioned it as a “literary arts magazine about sex and sexual issues.” Vita Excolatur followed shortly after at the University of Chicago (its title a truncated version of the university’s motto, translates roughly as “Life Enriched”), proclaiming itself “eager to engage all interested parties, from Republican pro-choicers to pro-Foucauldians.” And Columbia now has, simply, Outlet, whose second issue, published online in December 2006, includes a review of eight vibrators and an article on “vaginal personality” — shades of Dr. Betty Dodson, the masturbation instructress — subtitled “How snarky is your punani?”




Chris Keeley

Patrick Seale: "Ready for Resolution?

TO: Distinguished Recipients
FM: John Whitbeck
Transmitted below is a subtle analysis of attitudes toward the three
principal problems facing this region by Patrick Seale.
The /realpolitik/ attitudes toward the American war against Iraq which
he reports are reminiscent of the American attitude toward the Iran-Iraq
war of 1980-1988, during which American politicians were quite frank
about their satisfaction at watching Iraqis and Iranians slaughter each
other /ad infinitum/ and weighed in from time to time to assist
whichever side appeared at a disadvantage with a view to perpetuating
the bloodletting for as long as possible.
If certain political leaderships in the region are reluctant to see an
American withdrawal from Iraq, it is for all the wrong reasons and has
nothing to do with the best interests of either Iraqis or Americans.

*READY FOR RESOLUTION?*

/By Patrick Seale/

/The Saudi Gazette, March 3, 2007/

The Club de Monaco must be one of the most exclusive in the world
because its members – all heavyweights of international politics – meet
for just one weekend a year in the exquisite setting of the Hotel de
Paris at Monte Carlo.

The aim of the Club is to bring together government ministers,
secretaries-general of international organizations, European
Commissioners, ambassadors, foreign affairs pundits and similar men and
women of distinction to exchange views frankly and informally on the
great questions of the moment, especially as they refer to the Middle
East and the Mediterranean basin.

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