February 26th, 2007

Chris Keeley

THE REDIRECTION

THE REDIRECTION
by SEYMOUR M. HERSH
Is the Administration’s new policy benefitting our enemies in the war on terrorism?
Issue of 2007-03-05
Posted 2007-02-25

A STRATEGIC SHIFT


In the past few months, as the situation in Iraq has deteriorated, the Bush Administration, in both its public diplomacy and its covert operations, has significantly shifted its Middle East strategy. The “redirection,” as some inside the White House have called the new strategy, has brought the United States closer to an open confrontation with Iran and, in parts of the region, propelled it into a widening sectarian conflict between Shiite and Sunni Muslims.

To undermine Iran, which is predominantly Shiite, the Bush Administration has decided, in effect, to reconfigure its priorities in the Middle East. In Lebanon, the Administration has coöperated with Saudi Arabia’s government, which is Sunni, in clandestine operations that are intended to weaken Hezbollah, the Shiite organization that is backed by Iran. The U.S. has also taken part in clandestine operations aimed at Iran and its ally Syria. A by-product of these activities has been the bolstering of Sunni extremist groups that espouse a militant vision of Islam and are hostile to America and sympathetic to Al Qaeda.

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Chris Keeley

Check out "YouTube - Dick Cheney's Very Own Classic Definition

Subject:        Check out "YouTube - Dick Cheney's Very Own Classic Definition
of a Quagmire"
Date:   Mon, 26 Feb 2007 10:56:20 EST
From:   Ray Close


<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGIe1gPaTXY>Don't fail to give this a
click. It's a 10-second recording of a statement made by Dick Cheney in
1991.  Don't miss it!

Click Here: Check out "YouTube - Dick Cheney's Very Own Classic
Definition of a Quagmire" <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGIe1gPaTXY>
Chris Keeley

Judge Dismisses CIA Leak Trial Juror

Judge Dismisses CIA Leak Trial Juror

By MATT APUZZO
The Associated Press
Monday, February 26, 2007; 11:30 AM

 

WASHINGTON -- A juror was dismissed from the trial of former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby on Monday after court officials learned she had been exposed to information about the case over the weekend.

U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton ordered the juror removed, saying "what she had exposure to obviously disqualifies her." The judge declined to say what information the juror had seen but characterized it as a misunderstanding. He has ordered jurors to avoid media coverage of the case.

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Chris Keeley

Substance Over Image

Substance Over Image

Six years ago a man unsuited both by intellect and by temperament for high office somehow ended up running the country.

How did that happen? First, he got the Republican nomination by locking up the big money early.

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Chris Keeley

Note: This is a very long article, with not a lot new, but it well

Note: This is a very long article, with not a lot new, but it well
conveys the complexity of the situation we have created in the Middle
East with our invasion of Iraq. We would have been much wiser to use the
years 2002 and 2003 not to prepare an invasion of Iraq, but to use our
immense influence with Israel to get that country to agree to a
two-state solution, to implement UNSC resolutions 242 and 338, to trade
land for peace, and to accept the generous Saudi-proposed Arab Peace
Initiative of 2002 by which all of the Arab states and the Palestinians
would have signed peace treaties with Israel so long as Israel withdrew
to the 1967 internationally recognized borders. Had we done that, the
current Middle East would look vastly different than what is described
in this article.


THE REDIRECTION
by SEYMOUR M. HERSH
Is the Administration's new policy benefitting our enemies in the war on
terrorism?
Issue of 2007-03-05
Posted 2007-02-25

A STRATEGIC SHIFT


In the past few months, as the situation in Iraq has deteriorated, the
Bush Administration, in both its public diplomacy and its covert
operations, has significantly shifted its Middle East strategy. The
"redirection," as some inside the White House have called the new
strategy, has brought the United States closer to an open confrontation
with Iran and, in parts of the region, propelled it into a widening
sectarian conflict between Shiite and Sunni Muslims.

To undermine Iran, which is predominantly Shiite, the Bush
Administration has decided, in effect, to reconfigure its priorities in
the Middle East. In Lebanon, the Administration has coöperated with
Saudi Arabia's government, which is Sunni, in clandestine operations
that are intended to weaken Hezbollah, the Shiite organization that is
backed by Iran. The U.S. has also taken part in clandestine operations
aimed at Iran and its ally Syria. A by-product of these activities has
been the bolstering of Sunni extremist groups that espouse a militant
vision of Islam and are hostile to America and sympathetic to Al Qaeda.
Chris Keeley

February 26, 2007

February 26, 2007

Libby Juror Dismissed Over Media Exposure

WASHINGTON, Feb. 26 — A juror in the perjury trial of I. Lewis Libby Jr., Vice President Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, was dismissed from the panel today after acknowledging that she had had outside contact with information related to the case.

Federal Judge Reggie B. Walton said the jury’s deliberations, which began at mid-day Wednesday, could go on with 11 members on the panel. “I don’t think it would be appropriate to throw away those two and a half days,” he said, alluding to the work that jurors had done up to this morning.

The judge’s decision came over the objection of the prosecutor, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, who wanted one of two remaining alternates to be seated, bringing the jury panel back to 12. But that would have required the newly constituted jury to begin deliberations all over again, a development that the chief defense lawyer, Theodore V. Wells Jr., said would be prejudicial to his client.

Judge Walton said the problem juror’s exposure to outside information was the result of a misunderstanding rather than intentional on her part. But he said he had no choice but to dismiss her. The woman, who now lives in Washington, was a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for decades.

Mr. Libby is charged with obstruction of justice, lying to federal agents and perjuring himself before a grand jury amid an investigation over who made public the name of a C.I.A. operative, Valerie Wilson, whose husband, the former diplomat Joseph C. Wilson IV, was highly critical of the Bush administration’s rationale for going to war in Iraq.

Before dismissing the juror, and ruling that the 11 remaining on the panel could continue to deliberate, Judge Walton questioned them individually. He then cautioned the jurors, as he has daily over the four-week trial, to avoid contact with any case-related information from outside the courtroom.

When the trial began, there were 16 jurors — counting four alternates — but two were let go before today for reasons not having to do with the case.

Chris Keeley

Early Photographically Illustrated Books

Early Photographically Illustrated Books

Photographer; Delamotte, Philip Henry (1820 - 1889)
Medium; Photographic print, 28.2x23.7 centimetres
Publisher; The Photographic Institution; London, England; 1855
Shelfmark; Tab.442.a.5, 11

Close-up of the complex framework which supports the upper gallery of the Crystal Palace exhibition hall at Sydenham, designed by architect Joseph Paxton for the first universal fair held in Hyde Park in 1851. After the exhibition closed, the prefabricated building was dismantled and reconstructed in south-east London. The building was a milestone in the development of modern architecture for its innovative use of wrought iron and glass, symbolic of English power both from a political and engineering standpoint.

More about this collection


006ZZZ0TAB442A5U00011000

http://www.collectbritain.co.uk/search/advanced.cfm?collection=Early%20Photographically%20Illustrated%20Books&step=val_form

Photographer; Delamotte, Philip Henry (1820 - 1889)
Medium; Photographic print, 19.2x15.2 centimetres
Publisher; The Photographic Institution; London, England; 1855
Shelfmark; Tab.442.a.5, 14

Restoration work in progress in the grounds of Crystal Palace in Sydenham Hill. After housing the Great Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, the Crystal Palace was dismantled and rebuilt in south-east London. The first column was raised on 5 August 1852 and the palace was opened by Queen Victoria on 10 June 1854. P H Delamotte was commissioned to document its reconstruction (1852-1854) for the Crystal Palace Art Union.

More about this collection


006ZZZ0TAB442A5U00014000
Chris Keeley

FLASHES OF LIGHT

FLASHES OF LIGHT
by PETER SCHJELDAHL
Jeff Wall’s pictures.
Issue of 2007-03-05
Posted 2007-02-26

The Museum of Modern Art’s retrospective of the resourceful Vancouver photographic artist Jeff Wall is richly uneven. It suggests less a career than a case history, tracking an intellectually ambitious, morally earnest perfectionist through the fevers and chills of latter-day avant-gardism, in which he has starred for nearly three decades. Rarely are viewers permitted to relax and enjoy the intrinsic gorgeousness of Wall’s signature medium—big color transparencies of cinematically staged, often digitally jiggered scenes, mounted on fluorescent light boxes. The prevailing style is realist, but it is regularly beset by mixed, toilsome aims: Wall has harbored enough motives to impel several artists, and they have tended to get in the way of one another. There is the righteous Wall, who lodges complaints on behalf of racial minorities and the poor: in “Mimic” (1982), a bearded lout makes an insulting gesture to an Asian man on a city street; “An Eviction” (1988, reworked in 2004) is an aerial view of a neighborhood in which a violent dispossession takes place. The erudite Wall imports art-historical and ideological arcana with motifs from Manet, Hokusai, or Walker Evans here and a redolence of German or French critical theory there; Guy Debord’s “The Society of the Spectacle” (1967), among other strenuous texts, influenced Wall’s adoption of commercial signage techniques, in a spirit of criticizing mass culture. Wall the director deploys Brechtian alienation effects, to a fault, in his use of models and actors: in “The Goat” (1989), the stilted postures of four boys bullying a fifth quash any possible drama. Finally, there is Wall the lurking suitor of beauty in landscape, cityscape, interior, and still-life. He’s my favorite, and, lately, the most prominent. The retrospective and a concurrent show of notably strong new pictures at the Marian Goodman gallery give a strange impression of development in reverse: an artist doing his relatively uncomplicated early work last.

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Chris Keeley

Tyler Hicks, 37, a staff photographer for The New York Times, was named the newspaper photographer o

Tyler Hicks, 37, a staff photographer for The New York Times, was named the newspaper photographer of the year by the Missouri School of Journalism’s Pictures of the Year International contest, known as POYi. 


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/26/business/media/26times.html

Times Photographer Honored 

The Wounded


Interactive Feature: Reports From Israel and Lebanon 

Search for Taliban 

Interactive Feature: Turmoil in the Mideast 

Chávez Wins Easily in Venezuela


Photos and More Information (poyi.org)

Mr. Hicks was honored for five series of photographs that he took in 2006 in Afghanistan, Lebanon, Israel, Camden, N.J., and other places.

After working in Afghanistan last year, Mr. Hicks was on a flight, returning to the United States, when Hezbollah fighters kidnapped two Israeli soldiers. He decided to return immediately to the Middle East. Taking photos in Lebanon last summer was particularly difficult, he said.

“The Israeli military was bombing all over Lebanon, and they had warned vehicles, with leaflets that they had dropped, to stay off the road, that any vehicle was subject to being bombed,” Mr. Hicks said. “So that made it very difficult to move around.”

He said that he ended up traveling more on foot because it was safer than being in a vehicle.

Mr. Hicks has worked as a staff photographer for The Times for five years, and previously took freelance photographs for The Times in Nairobi, Kenya, Kosovo and the Balkans. In the last few years, he has photographed the devastation in Indonesia after the tsunami, presidential elections in Haiti and Venezuela, poverty in India and the conflict in Iraq.

He graduated from Boston University with a degree in journalism in 1992.



Chris Keeley

Afghan widows

Afghan widows 

http://www.poyi.org/64/12/ae04.php

Award of Excellence
Rafiq Maqbool Wire Service
"Afghan widows" Afghan widows line up to get their food relief rations at a CARE International food distribution center in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, January 23, 2006. Three-quarters of foreign aid to Afghanistan does not go to the government, which hinders its ability to plan a budget and set priorities, the World Bank said on Monday.

Chris Keeley

The WaPo may have ignored your Libby letter, in any case. . .

Subject:        The WaPo may have ignored your Libby letter, in any case. . .
Date:   Mon, 26 Feb 2007 12:56:27 -0500
From:  


   Monday, 26 February 2007    www.noquarter.typepad.com
   <http://www.noquarter.typepad.com>


     Crickets at the Washington Post
     <http://noquarter.typepad.com/my_weblog/2007/02/crickets_at_the.html>

*by
Larry C Johnson*

*I have tried repeatedly in the last two weeks to get a letter to the
editor and a letter to the Ombudsman (perhaps Ombudswoman?) published at
the Washington Post in response to their clear policy of advocating on
behalf of Scooter Libby. *

*Here's my most recent letter to Deborah Howell, the incompetent ombudsman:*

   *Dear Ms. Howell:*

   *Instead of turning to someone who actually knows the truth you
   prefer to bury your
   head in the sand of ingnorance.  It is not just my word.  You can
   ask a host of
   retired CIA officers who can verify that Valerie Plame was covert
   until her identity
   was compromised in the Robert Novak article.  The willful ignorance
   of the Post
   is a disgrace to journalism.  The number of people who can vouch for
   Valerie's
   identity is significant.  Ask Tyler Drumheller, Chief of the
   European Division of
   the CIA Directorate of Operations.  Ask Robert Grenier.  Ask me.
   Ask Jim Marcinkowski.
   Ask Mike Grimaldi.  Ask Brent Cavan.  Ask Gary Berntsen.  Ask Mike
   Gorbel.  instead
   of talking to CIA officers who know firsthand, you rely on Victoria
   Toensing, who
   has ZERO experience as a CIA officer.  Hell, ask John McLaughlin.
   Ask Bill Harlow
   (oops, I forgot, he already told your reporters she was undercover
   and asked them
   not to report it.)*

   *Your ignorance and cowardice on this is breathtaking.
   Larry Johnson*
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Chris Keeley

Times of London on Generals and Iran

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/iraq/article1434540.ece


 US generals ‘will quit’ if Bush orders Iran attack

Michael Smith and Sarah Baxter, Washington

SOME of America’s most senior military commanders are prepared to resign
if the White House orders a military strike against Iran, according to
highly placed defence and intelligence sources.

Tension in the Gulf region has raised fears that an attack on Iran is
becoming increasingly likely before President George Bush leaves office.
The Sunday Times has learnt that up to five generals and admirals are
willing to resign rather than approve what they consider would be a
reckless attack.
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