February 1st, 2007

Chris Keeley

Libby Judge Shows Doubt on Defense's Scapegoat Argument

Libby Judge Shows Doubt on Defense's Scapegoat Argument

By Carol D. Leonnig and Amy Goldstein
Washington Post Staff Writers
Thursday, February 1, 2007; 1:54 PM

 

A federal judge presiding over the perjury trial of Vice President Cheney's former chief of staff expressed doubt this morning about defense arguments that I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby was made a scapegoat by the White House in 2003 as the furor grew over the leak of a CIA officer's identity to the media.

On the seventh day of testimony in Libby's trial, U.S. District Judge Reggie B. Walton said that argument was dramatically undercut by a key piece of evidence in the case -- that former White House press secretary Scott McClellan, at Cheney's direction, publicly exonerated Libby in the fall of 2003 of any role in leaking information about the officer, Valerie Plame.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

The Libby Trial: Time Magazine Reporter Testifies Karl Rove First Revealed Identity of CIA Operative

The Libby Trial: Time Magazine Reporter Testifies Karl Rove First Revealed Identity of CIA Operative Valerie Plame

Thursday, February 1st, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/02/01/1532228

David Corn of the Nation magazine joins us with the latest on the trial of Vice President Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, Lewis “Scooter" Libby. Former Time Magazine reporter Matt Cooper testified Wednesday that it was President Bush’s political advisor, Karl Rove, who first revealed the CIA status of Valerie Plame. Cooper follows former New York Times reporter Judith Miller, who acknowledged she had conversations with other government officials and could not be “absolutely certain” that she first heard about Plame from Libby. [includes rush transcript]

 


We end today’s program with the latest on the trial of Vice President Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, Lewis “Scooter" Libby. Former Time Magazine reporter Matt Cooper testified Wednesday that it was President Bush’s political advisor, Karl Rove, who first revealed the CIA status of Valerie Plame. Cooper is the second reporter to testify at Libby’s perjury and obstruction trial. On Tuesday, former New York Times reporter Judith Miller was called to the witness stand. In her second day of testimony, Miller acknowledged that she had conversations with other government officials and could not be “absolutely certain” that she first heard about Plame from Libby. One of Libby’s lawyers told the judge that the defense plans to call the managing editor of the New York Times, Jill Abramson, to discredit Miller.

The government’s other witnesses who have testified in the trial so far include Ari Fleischer, the former White House Press Secretary and Catherine Martin, Dick Cheney’s former spokesperson. Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald said Wednesday that the government expected to finish presenting its case early next week.

David Corn has been closely following this story.

 

  • David Corn. Washington Editor of The Nation magazine. He is co-author of the new book, “Hubris: The Inside Story of Spin, Scandal, and the Selling of the Iraq War," with Michael Isikoff. He is also the author of the blog Capital Games.

AMY GOODMAN: David Corn has been closely following this case,

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Anna is not Machiavellian,” said Michael Roberts, the fashion director of Vanity Fair

Ms. Wintour has identified the prime cultural coordinates — the compliant, publicity-seeking socialite, the obsession with money, the struggling young designer, the deterioration of old aesthetics and the rise of the luxury-goods tycoon — and aimed Vogue straight at them


Citizen Anna
Chris Keeley

Bond's account provided the jury the first details of the deliberate lies the prosecution alleges Ch

FBI agent Deborah S. Bond told jurors in Libby's perjury trial that he said he did not come across a hand-written note he had taken during a telephone conversation with Vice President Cheney until he was preparing to be interviewed as part of the investigation.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/01/AR2007020100913.html

FBI Agent: Libby Said He Was Surprised to Hear About Plame From Russert

By Carol D. Leonnig and Amy Goldstein
Washington Post Staff Writers
Thursday, February 1, 2007; 5:56 PM

An FBI agent who interviewed I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby during the CIA leak investigation testified today that the vice president's then-chief of staff did not reveal that he had repeatedly disclosed the identity of undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame to reporters and insisted he was surprised when another journalist later told him about her.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Cheney's Handwritten Notes Implicate Bush in Plame Affair

Cheney's Handwritten Notes Implicate Bush in Plame Affair

Cheney's Handwritten Notes Implicate Bush in Plame Affair
    By Jason Leopold and Marc Ash
    t r u t h o u t | Report

    Wednesday 31 January 2007

    Copies of handwritten notes by Vice President Dick Cheney, introduced at trial by defense attorneys for former White House staffer I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, would appear to implicate George W. Bush in the Plame CIA Leak case.

    Bush has long maintained that he was unaware of attacks by any member of his administration against [former ambassador Joseph] Wilson. The ex-envoy's stinging rebukes of the administration's use of pre-war Iraq intelligence led Libby and other White House officials to leak Wilson's wife's covert CIA status to reporters in July 2003 in an act of retaliation.

    But Cheney's notes, which were introduced into evidence Tuesday during Libby's perjury and obstruction-of-justice trial, call into question the truthfulness of President Bush's vehement denials about his prior knowledge of the attacks against Wilson. The revelation that Bush may have known all along that there was an effort by members of his office to discredit the former ambassador begs the question: Was the president also aware that senior members of his administration compromised Valerie Plame's undercover role with the CIA?

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Following (1998)

Following Directed by
Christopher Nolan

Writing credits
Christopher Nolan

An older man listens to Bill's story about being a callow writer who likes to follow strangers around around London, observing them. One day, a glib and self-confident man whom Bill has been following confronts him. He's Cobb, a burglar who takes Bill under his wing and shows him how to break and enter. They burgle a woman's flat; Bill gets intrigued with her (photographs are everywhere in her flat). He follows her and chats her up at a bar owned by her ex-boyfriend, a nasty piece of work who killed someone in her living room with a hammer. Soon Bill is volunteering to do her a favor, which involves a break-in. What does the older man know that Bill doesn't?

Plot Summary for
Following (1998)

An older man listens to Bill's story about being a callow writer who likes to follow strangers around around London, observing them. One day, a glib and self-confident man whom Bill has been following confronts him. He's Cobb, a burglar who takes Bill under his wing and shows him how to break and enter. They burgle a woman's flat; Bill gets intrigued with her (photographs are everywhere in her flat). He follows her and chats her up at a bar owned by her ex-boyfriend, a nasty piece of work who killed someone in her living room with a hammer. Soon Bill is volunteering to do her a favor, which involves a break-in. What does the older man know that Bill doesn't?

The protagonist of Following is Bill (Jeremy Theobald). Bill is an unemployed aspiring writer who lives a solitary and boring life in London, England. Bill has a fascination with people, and with hopes of finding material to write about, begins to pick individuals out of a crowd, and to follow them. Bill establishes rules to keep him out of trouble and to keep his 'following' random, but soon enough he breaks one of his rules by following someone more than once. The character he follows on numerous occasions first is Cobb (Alex Haw). Cobb a confident and intelligent burglar catches Bill spying on him and soon involves Bill in his peculiar burglaries. Similar to Bill's interest in following, Cobb has a great interest in the individuals he is stealing from. During the robbery of a residence Bill becomes interested in the woman (Lucy Russell) who owns the flat, so he begins to follow her. Eventually he decides to meet her and they begin seeing each other. This upsets Cobb as he also learns the woman has asked Bill to do a job for her. But things are not as they seem, and soon Bill will find out why.


Christopher Nolan's first directorial effort, a year before he did "Memento," and this is almost as brilliant as that classic. He uses time differentials in a similar manner to tell his story, and it's a very clever one.

Bill is this young writer who begins following complete strangers around just to see where they live and what they're all about. One day, he follows this man, Cobb, who turns the tables and confronts Bill, who breaks down and confesses what he's up to.

Cobb is a burglar and he takes Bill along on a few jobs to teach him the ropes. Both men are voyeurs of a sort and a bond begins to grow between the two of them.

But there's an ulterior motive for Cobb nurturing this relationship, and it all ties in very smartly at the end. No, I won't spoil it but this is a very cool movie and I'm beginning to think Christopher Nolan is a genius.

If you like suspense films with surprise endings, this one is a must see.
Chris Keeley

The Recipients of Truthout's Freedom and Democracy Awards

Truthout 2007: Freedom and Democracy Awards
http://www.truthout.org/docs_2006/020107W.shtml

Today we are announcing the recipients of the first annual Truthout Freedom and Democracy Awards. These awards have been granted to three individuals who have done the most in the past year to promote freedom and democracy. These recipients will each receive an honorarium of $1,000 to assist them in continuing their work.

This year's recipients, in alphabetical order, are:

• Gold Star Mother of US Army Spc. Casey Sheehan and peace activist Cindy Sheehan, who has taken her protest of the War in Iraq to the president's doorstep and worked tirelessly to bring an end to US engagement in Iraq.

• 1st Lt. Ehren Watada, US Army, the first commissioned military officer to publicly refuse to deploy to Iraq, stating that the war was not legal.

• Ann Wright, former member of the military and a US State Department Foreign Service member who resigned her post in protest of the Iraq War and has joined the fight to end the war.

Each of these recipients has shown a deep commitment to efforts to strengthen freedom and democracy in a time of great need. Truthout salutes these honorees for their work.
Chris Keeley

Remembering Molly Ivins

Dear EmailNation Subscriber,

The nation's mostly widely syndicated progressive columnist and a great
friend of /The Nation/, *Molly Ivins* died today at age 62 after a long
battle with what she referred to as a "scorching case of cancer." John
Nichols' tribute to the warmest-hearted populist ever to pick up a pen
<http://lists.thenation.com/t?ctl=7FD4:58810> is the first in a series
of appreciations we plan to publish. As he writes, "If anyone picked a
fight with the powerful, she was there, writing with passion, humor and
unbridled joy." She'll be dearly missed.

Sincerely,
Peter Rothberg, /The Nation/