January 31st, 2007

Chris Keeley

Her reporting came under attack after articles she wrote suggested that Iraq possessed unconventiona

Her reporting came under attack after articles she wrote suggested that Iraq possessed unconventional weapons, coverage that helped the Bush administration build its case for invading Iraq but that turned out to be wrong.

Ex-Reporter for Times Testifies for Prosecutor Who Jailed Her

WASHINGTON, Jan. 30 — Judith Miller, a former reporter for The New York Times, testified Tuesday as a witness for the prosecutor who had put her in jail for 85 days, recounting details of her once-confidential interviews with I. Lewis Libby Jr.

Ms. Miller had initially refused to cooperate with the government in its investigation of Mr. Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, saying she would not violate her oath of confidentiality to Mr. Libby. But the special prosecutor, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, with the support of the federal courts, had her jailed until she relented. She asserted that Mr. Libby had released her from her vow of confidentiality.

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Chris Keeley

Reporter's Account Hurts Libby Defense

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/30/AR2007013000178.html

Miller testified yesterday that Libby discussed the topic with her twice before that date: on June 23 and on July 8, when Libby invited Miller to a breakfast meeting at the St. Regis Hotel.

Reporter's Account Hurts Libby Defense
Miller Testifies of White House Aide's Unmasking of Agent

By Carol D. Leonnig and Amy Goldstein
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, January 31, 2007; A01

Former New York Times reporter Judith Miller yesterday helped the prosecutor who landed her in jail and forced her into the witness chair, providing potentially damaging information about the confidential administration source she tried to shield, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby.

Deliberately and sometimes defensively offering her account in Libby's perjury trial, Miller told the jury that "a very irritated and angry" Libby told her in a confidential conversation on June 23, 2003, that the wife of a prominent critic of the Iraq war worked at the CIA. Libby had told investigators he believed he first learned that information from another journalist nearly three weeks later -- the assertion at the core of the charges against him.

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Chris Keeley

IN BLACK AND WHITE

In 1963, LeRoi Jones, a twenty-eight-year-old poet from Newark, New Jersey, sat down and wrote a play. Titled “Dutchman,” Jones’s one-act work was more or less finished twenty-four hours after its inception. In his 1984 autobiography, the author (who, in 1967, prompted by Malcolm X’s assassination two years earlier, abandoned his “slave name” to become Amiri Baraka, or Blessed Prince) wrote, “I can see now that the dramatic form began to interest me because I wanted to go ‘beyond’ poetry. I wanted some kind of action literature.” The “action literature” that he created would likely have made the great Thespis yelp. In “Dutchman,” he not only picked up some of the themes that Strindberg had explored in “Miss Julie,” his hallucinatory 1888 examination of class and gender, but added that other great taboo: race.

http://www.newyorker.com/critics/theatre/articles/070205crth_theatre_als
Chris Keeley

Ecce Homo

Ecce Homo
Issue of 2007-02-05
Posted 2007-01-29

Every thing that is
our strength
is also our weakness
everything carries within itself
the stigma of its opposite sign
like a number tattooed on a prisoner’s arm
like a letter sewn onto a deportee’s coat

there’s no escaping it

even if we were to walk at a certain pace
head held high
number and letter warn:
here is a victim of those clothed in wolves’ skins
here branded by history
ecce homo

—Ryszard Kapuściński

(Translated, from the Polish, by Diana Kuprel and Marek Kusiba.)
Chris Keeley

Situation 2: The Subway Turnstile Pictures (More Turns). I developed a situation so that various sub

Situation 2: The Subway Turnstile Pictures (More Turns). I developed a situation so that various subjects could be defined by the constraints of exactly the same mechanical apparatus. The scenario consisted of someone passing through a subway turnstile. At the moment that the subjects passed through the turnstile, unknown to them, I took their picture stationed at a distance of eleven feet. I stood there turning pages of a magazine observing subjects out of the corner of my eye, waiting for only the moment when they pushed the turnstile bar to release the shutter.'

The Subway Turnstile Pictures (More Turns) è una delle tre 'situazioni' del progetto fotografico di Bill Sullivan. Interessanti anche le altre due: The Times Square Portraits (Time Port) e The Elevator Portraits (Stop Down)...

Chris Keeley

Blood of the Earth: Dilip Hiro on the Battle for the World’s Vanishing Oil Resources

Blood of the Earth: Dilip Hiro on the Battle for the World’s Vanishing Oil Resources

Wednesday, January 31st, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/01/31/1543222

In his new book, veteran Middle East Journalist Dilip Hiro offers a detailed account of how and why the planet’s limited supply of oil has come to revolutionize human behavior, politics and warfare across the globe. He joins us for a wide-ranging interview. [includes rush transcript]

 

As scientists in Paris finalize their report on the adverse effects of human-caused emissions on climate change, a new book offers a detailed account of how and why the planet’s limited supply of oil has come to revolutionize human behavior, politics and warfare across the globe. “Blood of the Earth: The Battle for the World’s Vanishing Oil Resources” is a detailed account of the history of oil. It reveals that when states replaced coal with oil, they scrambled to meet an unprecedented global energy demand.

The book details how states have attempted to meet a growing thirst for oil through economic expansion and all-out war. It also explores developments in alternative and renewable sources of energy. With us now is the author of the book, Dilip Hiro. He is a veteran journalist on the Middle East. His trilogy of books on Iraq and Iran are considered some of the most definitive histories of the wars in the Persian Gulf.

 

  • Dilip Hiro. Veteran journalist on the Middle East. His trilogy of books on Iraq and Iran are considered some of the most definitive histories of the wars in the Persian Gulf. His latest book is called “Blood of the Earth: The Battle for the World’s Vanishing Oil Resources.”

AMY GOODMAN: We’re joined now by the book’s author, Dilip Hiro,

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Chris Keeley

Libby's letter, which mentioned her vacations out West and urged her to "come back to life," also al

Miller Testifies to Multiple Sources on Plame
Reporter Not 'Absolutely Certain' Libby Was First Source

By Amy Goldstein and Carol D. Leonnig
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, January 31, 2007; 1:36 PM

 

Former New York Times reporter Judith Miller testified this morning that she heard about undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame from sources in addition to I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby but said she could not remember who those people were.

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Chris Keeley

Judge Reggie B. Walton told Ms. Miller a juror wanted to know why she had not contacted Mr. Libby ea

Libby’s Lawyers Question Reporter’s Memory

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31 – A lawyer for I. Lewis Libby Jr. tried to portray a former New York Times reporter today as having a “fuzzy” memory of her conversations with Mr. Libby about a C.I.A. agent whose husband was a critic of the Bush administration.

The lawyer, William Jeffress Jr., brought up several occasions in which the reporter, Judith Miller, acknowledged a weak memory and seemed not entirely certain of the notes she made after meeting with Mr. Libby, once the chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney.

Ms. Miller’s credibility is crucial, because her testimony contradicts the account Mr. Libby gave to a grand jury about when and how he first learned of the agent’s identity.

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Chris Keeley

(no subject)

Sally Mann came to the world’s attention in the early 1990s with her book and exhibition “Immediate Family,” a series of luminous, haunting photographs of her young children, Emmett, Virginia and Jessie, that evoked the languid anxiety of preadolescence, the sense of somnolent August days soon to vanish with the coming winds of maturity, sex and longing. 



Stick Figure Productions/HBO Documentary Films

Sally Mann, left, and above, one of her photographs of children, “At Warm Springs” (1991). 

Sally Mann Portrait in Which She’s the Star

Sally Mann came to the world’s attention in the early 1990s with her book and exhibition “Immediate Family,” a series of luminous, haunting photographs of her young children, Emmett, Virginia and Jessie, that evoked the languid anxiety of preadolescence, the sense of somnolent August days soon to vanish with the coming winds of maturity, sex and longing.

Ms. Mann’s pictures arrived as the maelstrom surrounding the McMartin preschool sex-abuse trials in California was finally waning and the hysteria around the sexualizing of children perhaps seemed to be ebbing. But her portraits stirred controversy while they brought her fame, renewing concerns that America’s young were no longer adequately and safely kept.

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Chris Keeley

90 original slabs of Stonehenge, researchers have long known, were carefully placed to align with th

We have found that Stonehenge itself was just half of a larger complex," one used by indigenous Britons whose beliefs centered on ancestor and sun worship.


90 original slabs of Stonehenge, researchers have long known, were carefully placed to align with the rising and setting of the sun during the summer and winter solstices.


This photo provided by the National Geographic Society shows the Stonehenge monument, within Stonehenge World Heritage site in January 2007. Archaeological research in 2006 funded partly by National Geographic supports a theory that the monument was part of a much larger religious complex used for funerary ritual.

By Marc Kaufman
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, January 31, 2007; A01

 

New excavations near the mysterious circle at Stonehenge in southern England have uncovered dozens of homes where hundreds of people lived -- at roughly the same time that the giant stone slabs were being erected 4,600 years ago.

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Chris Keeley

Cooper is the eighth government witness to testify that Libby knew about CIA officer Valerie Plame o

Cooper is the eighth government witness to testify that Libby knew about CIA officer Valerie Plame or shared information about her in the weeks before Libby contends he learned her name.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/31/AR2007013100900.html

Cooper: Libby One of Two Sources to Confirm Plame Identity

By Amy Goldstein and Carol D. Leonnig
Washington Post Staff Writers
Wednesday, January 31, 2007; 6:22 PM

Former Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper testified today that I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby was one of two government sources to confirm the identity of an undercover CIA officer for him.

Cooper told the court in Libby's perjury trial that he first learned in a quick and confidential conversation with senior White House adviser Karl Rove in July 2003 that the wife of a prominent war critic worked at the CIA. He said that Libby, Vice President Cheney's former chief of staff, confirmed the information for him at the end of another telephone call in early July.

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Chris Keeley

Former Times Reporter Testimony Is Challenged

that the note was an effort to persuade Ms. Miller to lie to the grand jury and back up Mr. Libby’s story, saying it demonstrated Mr. Libby’s “consciousness of guilt.”

Former Times Reporter Testimony Is Challenged

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31 — A former reporter for The New York Times jousted for nearly two hours on Wednesday with a lawyer for I. Lewis Libby Jr. over her credibility and memory.

They argued over the significantly damaging testimony that the reporter, Judith Miller, had given about three conversations she had with Mr. Libby, the former chief of staff for Vice President Dick Cheney, who is facing perjury and obstruction of justice charges.

Ms. Miller testified on Tuesday that Mr. Libby had told her in those conversations details about the identity of Valerie Wilson, a Central Intelligence Agency operative, days before Mr. Libby said he learned about Ms. Wilson from reporters.

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