January 30th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Children @ Eaglebrook. . . then Andover, etc. Transcending early bonds?

  Thanks to Carmen Grayson for these excerpts from Nick Bromell's
longer version essay published in the winter issue of The American
Scholar. I was lazy and distributed only the shorter version published
in Salon.com. The whole essay, which Nick sent me by mail, is 13 pages
and well worth reading in its entirety, especially as we are currently
in the midst of the Libby trial.

-------- Original Message --------
Subject:        Children @ Eaglebrook. . . then Andover, etc. Transcending
early bonds?
Date:   Mon, 29 Jan 2007 12:54:22 -0500
From:   Grayson

*"Scooter and Me," Bromell's piece published in /The American Scholar/
last week, is a richly detailed version of the /Salon/ article you sent
this morning. If you've already read the longer essay, just delete this
note with its meaty excerpts. *
**
*The /A.S. /essay probes aspects of Bromell's and Libby's personal lives
when they were, in effect, children.  Don't have time to go through and
indicate properly how much space between the quotations.  Easily
checked, though. **

The schoolboy incidents Bromell culls are personality markers which are
much harder to identify once we mature and become more self-protectively
opaque.  Or so it seems to me.
*
*"SCOOTER AND ME," excerpts.*

1.  *This nugget describes "success" as imparted to adolescents in the
world of the Eaglebrooks.  The observations remind me of
Kennan's painfully poignant reminiscences of a Midwestern boy trying to
understand the Ivy League East. *
**
*/Life is doubtless peculiar for anyone who has a childhood or college
friend go on to become stupendously successful and powerful. How can
you not judge yourself by the standard of his monumental achievement?
How can you not feel small and unworthy in comparison?
Collapse )
Chris Keeley

r crumb - hippy crypto

hippy crypto

http://www.cryptomundo.com/

R. Crumb and Bigfoot

Posted by: Loren Coleman on January 26th, 2007

FATE Magazine Bigfoot

Mark Frauenfelder recently posted at Boing Boing about the wonderful past era of beautiful art to be found on old covers of Fate.

Mark also mentioned a recent blog by David Pescovitz about the New York Times article “Mr. and Mrs. Natural,” and the author of that article contacted Mark to say two of Fate covers done in the last decade have been illustrated by the underground comics genius R. Crumb. Actually, it was three, two of which had Bigfoot themes and one was of an alien shown near a bed.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

This is a list of inventors who have been killed by inventions they designed or were involved in

This is a list of inventors who have been killed by inventions they designed or were involved in

The Punishment of Haman, by Michaelangelo.
The Punishment of Haman, by Michaelangelo.

This is a list of inventors who have been killed by inventions they designed or were involved in.

  • Haman. In the Book of Esther, (2nd century BC) Haman is hanged from the gallows he invented.
  • Wan Hu. A minor officer in Ming Dynasty who was trying to launch himself into space using a rocket.
  • William Bullock, Born 1813, died 1867, Bullock had his foot crushed while trying to repair a rotary printing press that he had invented. The resulting infection would later prove fatal.
  • Otto Lilienthal died August 10, 1896 from injuries sustained two days earlier in a crash of one of his hang gliders.
  • Thomas Midgley, Jr. accidentally strangled himself with the cord of a pulley-operated mechanical bed of his own design in 1944.
  • Alexander Bogdanov, a physician and scientist, conducted an experiment for a "rejuvenation" technique wherein he deliberately gave himself a transfusion of blood from a student who suffered from malaria and tuberculosis. He died of the subsequent infection.

Chris Keeley

Chicago 10

On Sunday, Yippie co-founder Paul Krassner wrote an article for the LA Times about his contribution to a documentary about the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention riots, called Chicago 10

Paul Krassner

On Sunday, Yippie co-founder Paul Krassner wrote an article for the LA Times about his contribution to a documentary about the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention riots, called Chicago 10.

Paul sent me the the unedited version of an article, which was trimmed down by the LA Times, purely because of space limitations. Here it is in its entirety.

The Parts Left Out of Chicago 10

by Paul Krassner

200701291225 In 1967, Abbie Hoffman, his wife Anita and I took a work-vacation in Florida, renting a little house on stilts in Ramrod Key. We had planned to see The Professionals. “That’s my favorite movie,” Abbie said. “Burt Lancaster and Lee Marvin develop this tight bond while they’re both fighting in the Mexican revolution, then they drift apart.” But it was playing too far away, and a hurricane was brewing, so instead we saw the Dino Di Laurentiis version of The Bible. Driving home in the rain and wind, we debated the implications of Abraham being prepared to slay his son because God told him to. I dismissed this as blind obedience. Abbie praised it as revolutionary trust.
More...



The Parts Left Out of Chicago 10

by Paul Krassner

200701291225 In 1967, Abbie Hoffman, his wife Anita and I took a work-vacation in Florida, renting a little house on stilts in Ramrod Key. We had planned to see The Professionals. “That’s my favorite movie,” Abbie said. “Burt Lancaster and Lee Marvin develop this tight bond while they’re both fighting in the Mexican revolution, then they drift apart.” But it was playing too far away, and a hurricane was brewing, so instead we saw the Dino Di Laurentiis version of The Bible. Driving home in the rain and wind, we debated the implications of Abraham being prepared to slay his son because God told him to. I dismissed this as blind obedience. Abbie praised it as revolutionary trust.

 

This was the week before Christmas. We had bought a small tree and spray-painted it with canned snow. Now, we were tripping on LSD as the hurricane reached full force. “Hey,” Abbie yelled over the roar, “this is powerful [bleepin’] acid!” We watched Lyndon Johnson on a black-and-white TV set, although LBJ was purple-and-orange. His huge head was sculpted into Mount Rushmore. “I am not going to be so pudding-headed as to stop our half of the war,” he was saying, and the heads of the other presidents were all snickering and covering their mouths with their hands so they wouldn’t laugh out loud. This was the precise moment we acknowledged that we’d be going to the Democratic convention in August to protest the Vietnam war. I called Jerry Rubin in New York to arrange for a meeting when we returned. The conspiracy was beginning.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Libby Reportedly Said 'I Didn't Do It'

Libby Reportedly Said 'I Didn't Do It'

By MATT APUZZO
The Associated Press
Tuesday, January 30, 2007; 10:16 AM

 

WASHINGTON -- Amid the furor over the 2003 leak of a CIA operative's identity, Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, bluntly told a White House lawyer, "I didn't do it," the lawyer testified Tuesday.

David Addington, who served as Cheney's legal counsel during the CIA leak scandal, described a September 2003 meeting with Libby around the time that a criminal investigation began.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Libby Reportedly Said 'I Didn't Do It'

Libby Reportedly Said 'I Didn't Do It'

Filed at 10:16 a.m. ET

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Amid the furor over the 2003 leak of a CIA operative's identity, Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis ''Scooter'' Libby, bluntly told a White House lawyer, ''I didn't do it,'' the lawyer testified Tuesday.

David Addington, who served as Cheney's legal counsel during the CIA leak scandal, described a September 2003 meeting with Libby around the time that a criminal investigation began.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Reporter Judith Miller to Testify in CIA Leak Case

Reporter Judith Miller to Testify in CIA Leak Case

By Amy Goldstein and Carol D. Leonnig
Washington Post Staff Writers
Tuesday, January 30, 2007; 2:20 PM

 

Former New York Times reporter Judith Miller is due to testify today about conversations and a breakfast meeting she had with I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby in which she has said the vice president's former chief of staff told her the identity of undercover CIA officer Valerie Plame.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

His undertaking, one that spanned six continents, mirrors America's troubled quest to reverse a mist

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-061209atoms-day1-story,0,2034260.htmlstory

The Cold War's Deadly Legacy: How the U.S.'s Atom for Peace Program Helped Spread Nuke Technology to Iran and Beyond

Tuesday, January 30th, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/01/30/1515256

"The specter of nuclear warfare waged by North Korea or Iran has hung over the world in recent months. But beyond that fear and foreboding looms a more far-reaching threat: the vast amount of nuclear bomb-grade material scattered across the globe. And it wasn't Kim Jong Il or the ayatollahs of Iran who put it there. America did." Those are the opening lines of a new expose by the Chicago Tribune reporter Sam Roe.

 

Roe's investigation has found several tons of US nuclear bomb-grade material distributed under the Cold War Atoms for Peace program remains scattered across the planet. The US government has failed to retrieve forty tons of highly enriched uranium -- enough to make over 1,400 nuclear weapons. While the Bush administration says its trying to remove weapons-grade fuel from several research reactors around the world, many nuclear experts believe the US does not know how much enriched uranium exists abroad -- or even where it exists.

 

  • Sam Roe, staff reporter at the Chicago Tribune. His series on the U.S. Cold War program "Atoms for Peace" is featured this week.

 

 

www.democracynow.org

How the U.S. spread bomb-grade fuel worldwide — and failed to get it back. First of two parts.

By Sam Roe
Tribune staff reporter
Published January 28, 2007

Multimedia:
Unleashing the atom, what a nuclear device would do to Chicago, retracing Travelli's quest and more
Stories:
A threat made in America
The search for a magic fuel
A bigger risk than we're told
A tour of a Russian reactor
The specter of nuclear warfare waged by North Korea or Iran has hung over the world in recent months. But beyond that fear and foreboding looms a more far-reaching threat: the vast amount of nuclear bomb-grade material scattered across the globe.
And it wasn't Kim Jong Il or the ayatollahs of Iran who put it there. America did.
For a time, in a misguided Cold War program called Atoms for Peace, the U.S. actually supplied this material--highly enriched uranium, a key component of nuclear weapons. The Soviets followed suit.
The threat still posed by these stockpiles, particularly in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, is so dire that the keepers of the Doomsday Clock cited the issue as among their chief concerns this month when they moved the iconic measure of global security closer to midnight.
Just last week, Georgian authorities disclosed they had caught a Russian man trying to sell uranium he had hidden in two plastic bags in his pocket--an unsettling reminder of how easy it is to smuggle this dangerous material.
Yet decades of fitful commitment by the U.S. government to retrieve bomb-grade uranium have left the world no safer, a Tribune investigation has found. Today, roughly 40 tons of the material remains out of U.S. control--enough to make more than 1,400 nuclear weapons.
For a quarter-century, as the U.S. struggled to persuade friends and enemies alike to return the uranium in exchange for safer material, a physicist at Argonne National Laboratory outside Chicago led the effort.
Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Norah Jones' new album hits online record

Norah Jones' new album hits online record

LONDON (Reuters) - Hailed by critics as her best album to date, the new release from jazz vocalist Norah Jones, "Not Too Late," was the most pre-ordered album of all time on the online retailer Amazon.com.

The album, riding high in digital charts, gives a timely boost to EMI, the parent music company of her Blue Note label, which issued a profit warning earlier this month. EMI had tipped the album by the 27-year-old singer to be a big seller for the second half of its fiscal year.

The album was released around the world last week and in the United States on Tuesday, EMI said. It was No. 1 in the iTunes online music store in Germany, Austria, Netherlands and Switzerland, according to the iTunes Web site.

Collapse )
Chris Keeley

Actor Sean Penn summed up the new energy -- and the new focus -- of the anti-war movement Saturday,

http://www.thenation.com/blogs/thebeat?pid=161056

Actor Sean Penn summed up the new energy -- and the new focus -- of the anti-war movement Saturday, when he turned George Bush's own words against the president.

Just hours after the president had again reasserted his false claim to authority to pursue a war that is not wanted by the American people or the Congress, Penn told anti-war demonstrators gathered in Washington that Bush would be wise to review the Constitution.

"In a democracy," the actor told the cheering crowd, which organizers said numbered in the hundreds of thousands, "we are the deciders."

Collapse )