January 5th, 2007

Chris Keeley

Cindy Sheehan: “Our leaders who get us into these messes are the ones who need to be held accountabl

With New Congressional Majority, Should Democrats Focus on Domestic Agenda as Bush Escalates Iraq War?

Friday, January 5th, 2007

http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/01/05/1539243

On the opening day of the 110th Congress, the Democrats took control of the House and Senate for the first time in 12 years. The Democrats have outlined an ambitious domestic agenda for its first 100 hours in power, including raising the minimum wage and negotiating lower prescription drug prices for Medicare recipients. Peace activists are criticizing the Democrats for not focusing on Iraq amid the Bush administration’s plans for a troop surge. We host a debate between peace mom Cindy Sheehan and Roger Hickey of the Campaign for America’s Future. [includes rush transcript - partial]

 


In Washington, Nancy Pelosi was elected Thursday to be the country’s first female speaker of the house as the Democrats took control of both chambers of Congress for the first time in a dozen years. In the Senate, Harry Reid was elected Majority Leader. Shortly after becoming Speaker, Pelosi addressed the full House.

 

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Hours after the Democrats took control, the House passed what the Washington Post described as the broadest ethics and lobbying revision since the Watergate era. House members or employees are now prohibited from knowingly accepting gifts or travel from a lobbyist, foreign agent or lobbyist’s client. Lawmakers can no longer fly on corporate jets. The ethics committee must now pre-approve any Congressional travel financed by outside groups and all such trips will be immediately disclosed to the public. Only Republican Dan Burton of Indiana voted against the measure.

The ethics rule changes are part of Pelosi’s ambitious plan for the Democrats first 100 hours in power. Pelosi also wants to increase the minimum wage, allow the federal government to negotiate lower prescription drug prices for Medicare recipients and increase federal support for stem cell research.

But Pelosi’s 100 Hours plan has also come under criticism by anti-war activists for not focusing on Iraq. On Wednesday, Cindy Sheehan and others disrupted a press conference by Rahm Emanuel, the chair of the House Democratic Caucus. As soon as Emanuel began speaking, the activists started chanting "de-escalate, investigate, troops home now." Because of the protests, Emanuel abruptly postponed the press conference. After he left the podium, Cindy Sheehan took over the microphone.

 

  • Cindy Sheehan: “Our leaders who get us into these messes are the ones who need to be held accountable. And if that happens then maybe my grandchildren won't have to be fighting in an illegal and immoral war.”

And Cindy Sheehan joins us live now from Washington, D.C. to talk more about the Democrats first 100 hours in power -- She is the co-founder of Gold Star Families for Peace. Her son Casey was killed in Iraq in 2004. And next to Cindy is Roger Hickey. He is the co-director of the Campaign for America’s Future. His organization is part of the Change America Now coalition - a national campaign effort pushing Congress to pass the economic elements of Pelosi’s 100 Hour legislative agenda.

 

  • Cindy Sheehan. Her son Casey was killed in Iraq in April 2004. She is the co-founder of Gold Star Families for Peace.

 

  • Roger Hickey. Co-director of the Campaign for America’s Future.

JUAN GONZALEZ: Shortly after becoming Speaker, Pelosi addressed the full House.

    REP. NANCY PELOSI: It’s an historic moment for the Congress. It’s an historic moment for the women of America. It is a moment for which we have waited over 200 years. Never losing faith, we waited through the many years of struggle to achieve our rights. But women weren't just waiting; women were working. Never losing faith, we worked to redeem the promise of America, that all men and women are created equal. For our daughters and our granddaughters, today we have broken the marble ceiling. For our daughters and our granddaughters now, the sky is the limit. Anything is possible for them.

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Chris Keeley

Rehnquist FBI File Sheds New Light on Confirmation Battles, Drug Dependence

Rehnquist FBI File Sheds New Light on Confirmation Battles, Drug Dependence


Rehnquist FBI File Sheds New Light on Confirmation Battles, Drug Dependence

Tony Mauro

01-03-2007


The late Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s Senate confirmation battles in 1971 and 1986 were more intense and political than previously known, according to a newly released FBI file that also offers dramatic new details about Rehnquist’s 1981 hospitalization and dependence on a painkiller.

The FBI file on Rehnquist, released last week under the Freedom of Information Act, reveals that in 1971, as Rehnquist’s confirmation hearings for associate justice approached, the Nixon Justice Department asked the FBI to run a criminal background check on at least two potential witnesses who were expected to testify against Rehnquist. Then-FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover approved the request.

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Chris Keeley

Buried in the 1,500 pages of FBI files the federal government released last week on former Supreme C

Buried in the 1,500 pages of FBI files the federal government released last week on former Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist are three astonishing memos.
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G-men were used to quell justice's critics

 

 

 

Buried in the 1,500 pages of FBI files the federal government released last week on former Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist are three astonishing memos.

They have have nothing to do with Rehnquist's personal addiction to prescription drugs - as do most of the files the government released.

Chris Keeley

Counterculture Lion, Back in His Tidy Jungle

the 55 (for a while a druggies’ haunt, where Janice Stone once saw three men overdose on methadone) 



Stone's VillageSlide Show

Stone's Village 



East Village. More Photos

Robert Stone's Village

Counterculture Lion, Back in His Tidy Jungle

“I SUPPOSE the ’60s seemed like a big revolution, but to me it always felt a small circle of friends,” Robert Stone said recently while revisiting his old East Village neighborhood, one of that era’s epicenters. “And by the time of the Summer of Love, in the late ’60s, it was over. That was the end of it. Every kid who was on the loose turned up, and it was no longer our thing. It was a fashion.”

Mr. Stone, who is himself an emblematic ’60s figure — perhaps the only member of Ken Kesey’s famed Merry Prankster bus trip of 1964 who can still remember what happened — is 69 now, and he and Janice, his wife of 47 years, recently decided to take a break. No drink or drugs for at least a year, after which, Mr. Stone said, they will “rethink.” One bonus of the new regimen, he added, is that he now gets more work done in the evening. 

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Chris Keeley

The photographer, working for the Los Angeles Times, was at the Ambassador Hotel early June 5, 1968,

The photographer, working for the Los Angeles Times, was at the Ambassador Hotel early June 5, 1968, when Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was killed.

http://www.calendarlive.com/galleriesandmuseums/cl-et-artphotos5jan05,0,6406858.story?coll=la-home-headlines

Boris Yaro

Cerro Muriano, Spain / The Falling Soldier,” from 1936, was taken as the soldier suffered a fatal gunshot.

Robert Capa

The instant of Lee Harvey Oswald’s slaying — in Dallas on Nov.24, 1963 — is captured in this iconic image. Oswald had been arrested in the assassination of President Kennedy

Robert H. Jackson

This Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph, taken Feb. 1, 1968, captures the moment when South Vietnamese Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan raised a handgun to Bay Lop and killed him.

Eddie Adams

The June 11, 1963, self-immolation of Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk, in Saigon, South Vietnam.


Malcolm Browne