December 29th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Alex Katz Paints Ada

Alex Katz Paints Ada

http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/site/pages/content/exhibitions/special/katz/TJM_se_katz_2006.html

Alex Katz Paints Ada at the Jewish Museum in New York, NY. "...Alex Katz met Ada Del Moro in 1957 and  Ada in Black Sweaterof that year marks the beginning of their collaboration as artist and model.  
 Katz's paintings of Ada are often captivating because of what they leave out and do not say, and for the way they explore formal aspects of painting while hinting at possible narratives.  Ada has been called Katz's muse, nonetheless she has agency in the creation of her own image and influences how much Katz reveals about her."
Chris Keeley

John Divola

John Divola
Vandalism Series (folder two) / C
John Divola
1973-75

http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~divola/WEB%20Pages%20Grey/1970%27s/Vandalism%20Series/Vandalism%20Folder%202%20Hi%20Res/pages/C.htm

C


John Divola... Vandalism Series (folder two) / C (1973-75). From the Vandalism Series by John Divola. "...The greater degree to which reality exerts itself and lesser degree to which I exert myself, the better as far as I'm concerned. So when I'm working, I'm not worried about making documents of my marks. I'm just changing things to see what happens. I'm no more interested in my own marks that I am in debris on the floor or the way a curtain flies up because the wind's blowing in. Or if I throw something through the air, I certainly don't know how that's going to look, but it's just moving things around and creating an environment for something to take place. When I make the marks and when I throw things through the air, I try to be kind of spontaneous and not really think about it in a real conscious kind of way. And when I photograph I try to be more conscious and deliberate."
Chris Keeley

The Russian Vodka Museum

The Russian Vodka Museum 

http://www.vodkamuseum.ru/

Ivan IIIAs early as the beginning of the 16th century 














The word «vodka» has been known since the 17th century and is most likely a derivative of «voda» (water). In the past, other names were also used for the drink: wine (bread wine), korchma or korchma wine, distilled wine, burning wine, burnt wine and bitter wine among others. It is thought that the drink itself, or rather its ancestor, a strong drink called aqua vitae (Latin for «water of life»), was first brought to Russia by Genoese merchants on their way to Lithuania. They travelled via Moscow, where the foreign guests had an audience with Prince Dmitry Ivanovich, called Donskoy for his victory over the Mongol-Tartar army on the Kulikovo Field by the River Don. Flattered by the hospitality of the Moscow governor, they presented him with vessels with the above mentioned spirit. However, our ancestors were not much impressed with this distilled fermented grape juice. Mead and beer were more popular in Russia at the time.

Chris Keeley

Sheehan Arrested Outside Bush Meeting

Sheehan Arrested Outside Bush Meeting
Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Defense Secretary Robert Gates were all in attendance. The President also received some uninvited guests. Peace mom Cindy Sheehan and four other anti-war activists were arrested at a barricade on the president’s ranch. Sheehan said she wanted to display a “peace surge” as the White House moves towards a “troop surge” in Iraq. Sheehan’s son Casey was killed in Iraq in April 2004. 

Bush Admin Lists Polar Bear as Endangered Species
Facing a possible court battle over its lack of action on global warming, the Bush administration has agreed to declare the polar bear an endangered species. The move comes after environmental groups threatened to sue the White House for failing to protect the bears. The bears’ arctic habitat has seen declining ice coverage by the year – a decline environmentalist blame on global warming. Despite acknowledging the conditions in the bears’ habitats, the White House indicated no plans to curb Alaska oil drilling or impose new limits on emissions of greenhouse-gas.

    Greenpeace Research Director Kert Davies: "It's in law now. They have to account for the voice of the bear and the impact on the polar bear of any actions that are taken. So they have to account for increases in global warming pollution that might be caused by a federal project or a by an energy development project. We don't know how they're going to handle this yet, but by law, they should have to account for the inevitable impact of global warming, to global warming, of anything that the government does."
Chris Keeley

FSO(R) Ann Wright -- Five Years of Infamy: Close Guantanamo!

   *Five Years of Infamy: Close Guantanamo!*
   By Colonel Ann Wright, Retired
   t r u t h o u t | Guest Contributor

   Saturday 23 December 2006

   On January 11, 2002, the first detainees from Afghanistan arrived at
the prison in the US Naval Base, Guantanamo, Cuba. In the succeeding
five years, Guantanamo has symbolized to the world the Bush
administration's abandonment of international and domestic law, and the
development of a policy of inhumane treatment and use of torture. These
claims have been linked to military and CIA operations in Afghanistan,
Iraq and in an unknown number of secret prisons.

 
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Chris Keeley

RAY JOHNSON

RAY JOHNSON




Duchamp With Jean Harlow” is among the collages by Ray Johnson at the Feigen Contemporary gallery

RAY JOHNSON
En Rapport
Feigen Contemporary
535 West 20th Street, Chelsea
Through Jan. 6

Nearly 11 years ago, when he jumped from the Sag Harbor bridge on Long Island and calmly swam out to sea, Ray Johnson left behind a legacy that, as he no doubt imagined, would only become more interesting after his death.

A student of Josef Albers, friend of Joseph Cornell, neighbor of John Cage and Merce Cunningham, and someone who insinuated himself into the lives of just about every other conspicuous artist and art figure from the late ’50s until his death, Mr. Johnson made art out of the matrix of relationships.

Who knows how many hundreds or thousands of his “mail art” works survive — photocopied drawings and oblique collages with texts sent into the world via the United States Postal Service like messages in bottles? These sophisticated and ephemeral gestures expressed Mr. Johnson’s dual desire to exclude himself from the tawdry rough-and-tumble of the art world and at the same time to be taken seriously by it. He loved paradox.

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