December 17th, 2006

Chris Keeley

If any artist can be said to have lived — and probably died — for art, it is RAY JOHNSON.

This week at the FEIGEN CONTEMPORARY gallery in Chelsea is the last chance to see more than 40 hallucinatory, never-before-exhibited collages in which Mr. Johnson used his art friends and peers as raw material for his work.



Green Hornet With Arman and Andy,” one of many never-before-exhibited collages by Ray Johnson on display at Feigen Contemporary through Saturday.

This week at the FEIGEN CONTEMPORARY gallery in Chelsea is the last chance to see more than 40 hallucinatory, never-before-exhibited collages in which Mr. Johnson used his art friends and peers as raw material for his work.

If any artist can be said to have lived — and probably died — for art, it is RAY JOHNSON. In January 1995, at 67, after an unorthodox and highly productive career that lasted more than four decades, he swam the backstroke out into the frigid waters of Sag Harbor Cove on Long Island and drowned.

Whether his death was his last, most dramatic performance-art piece is only one of many questions surrounding Mr. Johnson, who wrapped himself in considerable mystery. Partly because of this, he was often portrayed during his life as a wily art-world outsider. But he was deeply involved with many of the most influential artists of his day, including Andy Warhol, Willem de Kooning, Merce Cunningham, Barnett Newman, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg.

This week at the FEIGEN CONTEMPORARY gallery in Chelsea is the last chance to see more than 40 hallucinatory, never-before-exhibited collages in which Mr. Johnson used his art friends and peers as raw material for his work. The collages mingle the names and sometimes the silhouettes of the famous and the favored with many of Mr. Johnson’s trademark bunnies and a Freudian stew of other images: a urinating penis, a spatula, a mousetrap, a head shot of Montgomery Clift.

Mr. Johnson, among the earliest artists to exploit celebrities as subject matter, thought of some of the collages as portraits. In his “portrait” of the cartoonist Saul Steinberg, a curvaceous beauty seems poised, like Esther Williams, to take a dive off his nose. Through Saturday, 535 West 20th Street, (212) 929-0500.

Another interesting show that Mr. Johnson might have appreciated, “ONE OF A KIND: THE STUDIO CRAFT MOVEMENT,” opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Friday. Following the history of the movement as it developed after World War II, the show focuses on 47 artists who used new materials and nontraditional methods in making furniture, housewares and other objects, infused with a strong sense of the abstract, the surreal and the playful. Through Sept. 3, (212) 535-7710.

Chris Keeley

Spanish portraiture was a man’s game, reflecting a patriarchal society where status was everything

Nobility was suggested by white lace cuffs and collar, the hilt of a sword and a proud pose.


Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artist Rights Society

Picasso fattens up his musketeer and lends him a sense of humor, with a splayed-leg stance, crossed eyes and clenched teeth. Painted more than 325 years after the Velázquez and El Greco portraits, Picasso’s “Musketeer” copies many attributes of the earlier works, including a somber palette, ruffled cuffs and collars, a rakish hat, and a goatee and mustache.
Chris Keeley

Marijuana Research Grow Room National Center for Natural Products Research Oxford, Miss.: The center

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Contraband Room Kennedy International Airport, Queens, N.Y.: Among the items seized from passengers in the 48 hours before the photograph was taken: African cane rats infested with maggots, Andean potatoes, Bangladeshi cucurbit plants, a pig’s head from South America.

Taryn Simon is of a younger generation (she is 31), and what she is after, in a remarkable new body of work she calls “An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar,” is something altogether different: a sense of what we won’t allow one another to see. In the realms of government, science, security and nature, among others, Simon has gained access where few others have.



Cryopreservation Unit Cryonics Institute Clinton Township, Mich.: This cryopreservation unit holds the bodies of Rhea and Elaine Ettinger, the mother and first wife of the cryonics pioneer Robert C. W. Ettinger. Robert, author of “The Prospect of Immortality” and “Man Into Superman, is still alive. The Cryonics Institute offers cryostasis (freezing) services for individuals and pets upon death. It charges $28,000 (plus fees) for the process if it is planned in advance of legal death and $35,000 for postmortem services.


Avian Quarantine Facility New York Animal Import Center Newburgh, N.Y.: African gray parrots and European finches, seized upon illegal importation into the U.S., in quarantine. Imported birds must undergo a 30-day mandatory quarantine in a U.S. Department of Agriculture animal-import facility. Before release, each bird is tested for avian influenza and exotic Newcastle disease.






White Tiger (Kenny) Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge Eureka Springs, Ark.: In the United States, all living white tigers are the result of selective inbreeding to artificially create the genetic conditions that lead to white fur, ice-blue eyes and a pink nose. Kenny was born in the care of a breeder in Bentonville, Ark., on Feb. 3, 1999. As a result of inbreeding, Kenny is mentally retarded.
Chris Keeley

Little Hokum Rag

http://amycrehore.blogspot.com/

Sunday, December 17, 2006

Daily Dreamtime

" Moon Tea House" by Christopher Keeley Copyright 2006

If you haven't yet discovered "Daily Dreamtime, Secret Surrealist Society", then let me introduce you to it. It is a most wonderful daily journal written by Christopher Keeley where he posts his own art/documentary/portrait photographs (soon to be a book called Paradise Life), plus a continuous stream of glimpses into other surreal and unusual artists, alive or dead, with lots of links. And, he's got great taste! He also writes about politics and what's happening in the world. Check it out! It's guaranteed not to bore you!
The above photo was a Christmas card he sent me recently.
The Art of Amy Crehore

Little Hokum Rag


Chris Keeley

Ripley's Game (2002) is a feature film based on Ripley's Game, the third novel in Patricia Highsmith

Just saw for the second time - thouroughly entertaing

http://www.ripleys-game.com/

Tom Ripley persuades a man to commit a murder for a large sum of money. The situation goes out of control, and that man must escape trouble

Directed by Liliana Cavani
Starring John Malkovich
Dougray Scott
Ray Winstone
Leana Headey
Chiara Caselli
Music by Ennio Morricone
Cinematography Alfio Contini
Editing by Jon Harris
Distributed by Fine Line Features (USA)
Release date(s) February 16, 2004
Running time 110 min.
Language English
Budget $30,000,000


In the third Ripliad novel, Tom Ripley is a wealthy man in his early thirties. He lives in Villeperce, France, with his French wife, Heloise, who is from a wealthy family. Tom spends his days living comfortably in his house, Belle Ombre, until an associate of his, an American criminal named Reeves Minot, asks him if he can commit a murder for him. Ripley — who "detest[s] murder, unless absolutely necessary" — turns down the offer of $96,000 dollars for the two hits, and Reeves goes back to Hamburg, Germany.

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Chris Keeley

Israel's Right to Exist

TO: Distinguished Recipients
FM: John Whitbeck

Now that the Palestinian civil war long sought by Israel, the U.S. and
the EU appears on the verge of breaking out, it may be timely to examine
the justification put forward by Israel, the U.S. and the EU for their
collective punishment of the Palestinian people in retaliation for their
having made the "wrong" choice in last January's democratic election --
the refusal of Hamas to "recognize Israel" or to "recognize Israel's
existence" or to "recognize Israel's right to exist".

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