December 13th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Perhaps Homer, too, is a card-carrying member of that club, which would explain in part the characte

Perhaps Homer, too, is a card-carrying member of that club, which would explain in part the character's penchant for donuts

http://boingboing.net/images/budshomer-1.jpg


Homer Simpson pops up on medical marijuana packaging


San Francisco resident "Tremain Calm" shares this scan of a legally-obtained bag of medical marijuana, featuring the presumably illicit use of Homer Simpson's likeness. Although -- who knows? Perhaps Homer, too, is a card-carrying member of that club, which would explain in part the character's penchant for donuts. Link to larger size. Bag label reads: "TRAINWRECK. Contingent to California H&S Code 11362.5 For medical use only. Do not operate heavy machinery or drive. This means you, Nicole Richie."

: Jesse Raub says,

It's probably a reference to a mid series episode where Homer gets his eyes pecked out by crows and gets prescribed medicinal marijuana - one of my favorite episodes. "They call 'em fingers, but I've never seen them fing. Oh! There they go." - Otto

posted by Xeni Jardin

Chris Keeley

Gareth has uploaded part 2 of his wonderful geek gift guide.

Gareth has uploaded part 2 of his wonderful geek gift guide.

http://www.streettech.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Reviews&file=index&req=showcontent&id=65

Gareth Branwyn's geek holiday gift guide 

Part One : goto

http://www.streettech.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Reviews&file=index&req=showcontent&id=64

Gareth has uploaded part 2 of his wonderful geek gift guide.
200612121220 PicoCricket
(Picocrocket.com, $250) If your child's interests run more towards felt and pipe cleaners than motors and gears, more CRAFT than MAKE, he might like the PicoCricket kit more than Mindstorms. Built in cooperation with LEGO, it includes a microcontroller and sensors, but it's more about embedding these technologies inside of other things (puppets and robotic plushies, kinetic sculptures, interactive lighting, etc.). In some ways, this kit is maybe more forward-looking than NXT, because it's about the disappearance of computer and robotic technologies into the fabric of our lives, and that's the future into which these kids are really growing.
Link
Chris Keeley

Mr. Carter told Soledad O’Brien that Israel would have peace if it simply withdrew from the Palestin

Mr. Carter told Soledad O’Brien that Israel would have peace if it simply withdrew from the Palestinian territories

 
go Jimmy Go
 
NY Times is biased against Jimmy at least Tom Zeller Jr. is.
 
INSERT DESCRIPTIONFormer President Jimmy Carter is answering a lot of questions about his book "Palestine: Peace, Not Apartheid" (Photo: Paul Connors/Associated Press)

The controversy following Jimmy Carter's new book "Palestine: Peace, Not Apartheid" continued this week, with the former president arguing on news talk shows that the book's loudest critics are attacking its title and not its content. 

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Chris Keeley

Charles Jones

$7,000 to $20,000 each.

Delicious to Look at, in a Midtown Gallery

Charles Jones, a gardener and photographer who worked in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, created stunning photographs of vegetables and flowers. Through Jan. 13, 29 of his gelatin silver prints, the largest exhibit of his work in this country, are on display at Howard Greenberg Gallery, 41 East 57th Street, (212) 334-0010; it is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. If you find you have to own one, they cost from $7,000 to $20,000 each.

Chris Keeley

The future of the Internet lies not with institutions but with individuals

Technophobic refuseniks are likely to carry out violent resistance, and they may have good reason: Out-of-control technology is a distinct risk

Today is de facto Bruce Sterling Day  (link to previous post). In his latest Wired column, he says "futurism has no future," and digs into the results of a recent Pew Internet & American Life Project survey. He writes:

 




















The bubble-era vision of a utopian Internet is dented and dirty. The Pew respondents seem to agree that personal privacy is a thing of the past, and they're split nearly 50-50 on whether the costs will outweigh the benefits. Technophobic refuseniks are likely to carry out violent resistance, and they may have good reason: Out-of-control technology is a distinct risk. The Lexus has collided with the olive tree, and its crumpled hulk spins in a ditch as the orchard smolders.

The future of the Internet lies not with institutions but with individuals. Low-cost connections will proliferate, encouraging creativity, collaboration, and telecommuting. The Net itself will recede into the background. If you're under 21, you likely don't care much about any supposed difference between virtual and actual, online and off. That's because the two realms are penetrating each other; Google Earth mingles with Google Maps, and daily life shows up on Flickr. Like the real world, the Net will be increasingly international and decreasingly reliant on English. It will be wrapped in a Chinese kung fu outfit, intoned in an Indian accent, oozing Brazilian sex appeal.

Link to "My Final Prediction." Image: I shot this portrait of Mr. Sterling a couple years ago in LA.

posted by Xeni Jardin

Chris Keeley

Deconstructing the macaca moment

Deconstructing the macaca moment

Deconstructing the macaca moment: "it didn't just happen."

On his blog, the eminently wise Bruce Sterling points to an essay analyzing exactly how that "macaca" video led to senatorial candidate George Allen's death-by-YouTube. Bruce says,
This isn't a 'centipede,' but it's an interesting primer on how to create, leverage and exploit one. It seems to be mostly about timing. You need to toss matches when the grass is dry and the wind is in your corner. As far as media exploitation goes, there's zero practical difference between a 'macaca moment' and a 'bimbo eruption.' What would be really useful at this point would be a primer on 'good damage control.' How do you kill a centipede?
Snip from the politicsonline item, via Bruce's blog:
At today's New Organizing Institute/Center for American Progress event, Jim Webb campaign manager Jessica Vanden Berg told a much more nuanced story about how the campaign took their opponent's mistake and ran with it as far as they could. Macaca didn't just happen; the Webb people MADE it happen.

S. R. Sidarth took the original footage of Allen taunting him in front of a crowd on August 11, a Friday. By that evening the senior campaign staff had heard the audio over the phone and realized that they had something that could be significant. After they actually saw the video, they knew they had a real gem — not only had Allen made comments with a racial edge, but he'd also bullied the Webb staffer in public.


But how to spread the word? According to Vanden Berg, they chose to post the video on YouTube because it was free (simple enough). But before they tossed it out for the public to see, they'd already pitched the story to a Washington Post reporter, who wrote about it online on Monday. Only after the Post story appeared and the issue had been properly framed did the Webb folks send an email to their supporter list and to friendly bloggers.

The fact that the video was on YouTube made it particularly easy to distribute, since bloggers could insert it directly into their pages, but it was the campaign's promotional work that spread the word. And as the story developed, they constantly worked reporters and bloggers behind the scenes to shape the public discussion.

Link.

posted by Xeni Jard

Chris Keeley

Bread Truck

Bread Truck



© Keeley 2006                                         Washington DC