December 12th, 2006

Chris Keeley

Reading and viewing "It's All Good," one gets the feeling that heroin and crack, not weed, are the r

Serbian photographer Boogie discusses taking to New York's seedy streets and capturing the true lives of junkies and gangsters.

Reading and viewing "It's All Good," one gets the feeling that heroin and crack, not weed, are the real gateway drugs.



http://www.salon.com/books/int/2006/12/07/boogie/

Dec. 7, 2006 | America's unending war on poverty and drugs has been about as successful as its unending war on terror, mainly because its enemies are abstractions. Meanwhile, the real worlds (not the ones you see on MTV) of drug and thug culture have been left to wither, like its victims and champions, beneath a glossy simulacrum.

Few are those souls who seek to document and transmit the routinized pain and addiction of these worlds -- worlds filled with everything but Cristal Champagne, Hummers and supermodels. Rather, they are the scenes of unending wars whose only victory is another fix; once each fix is achieved the whole process starts over again like a nightmarish rerun. So it should come as no surprise that those who journey into the hearts of darkness that pump lifeblood into these circular hells might know their way around a war zone.

Such is the story of the photographer Boogie, whose gritty photography collection, "It's All Good," out now from New York's powerHouse Books, chronicles the lives of thugs, hustlers and addicts without artifice. Currently based in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was born and raised in Serbia, and was eventually mired waist-deep in that conflict-torn country's unremitting violence and war during the '90s. After serving his stint in the military and getting lucky with a lottery draw for a green card, he fled the country for safer environs, only to be pulled back into the violent battle for the soul's deliverance, this time in a drug-addicted New York that looks nothing like the megamall environs favored by Rudolph Guiliani, George Pataki and Michael Bloomberg. In fact, "It's All Good" is a visual document that would most likely give those three fits, filled as it is with could-give-a-fuck individuals living fix to fix, fight to fight, weapon to weapon.

boogoeOf course, Boogie himself, like every American immigrant or native, is negotiating both worlds, shutterbugging for Nike (a company that knows more than a few things about image manipulation and capitalization) and other clients to keep the bills paid as he pursues the addicted phantoms that inhabit the United States' invisible, ignored streets and ghettos. If only to find, in the end, that true reality, the kind that creeps up behind you execution style, will not, if ever, be televised. We exchanged a series of e-mails in between Boogie's hectic promotion of "It's All Good" and a project for Nike.

from    Michael (nebris)

Chris Keeley

he was a self-described juvenile delinquent.

Hunter S. Thompson in his cabin in the Rocky Mountains in 1992.



A Gonzo Candle, Burned at Both Ends

It probably seemed like a great idea to hire Nick Nolte as narrator for a documentary about Hunter S. Thompson. Mr. Thompson, the author of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” “Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail” and “Hell’s Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga,” invented gonzo journalism. Mr. Nolte has a reputation for living gonzo.

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Chris Keeley

Seven of 10 inmates released from prison in California return, one of the highest rates in the count

The California prison system is so crowded that 16,000 inmates, including these in Sacramento, are assigned cots in hallways and gyms. More Photos





The overcrowding is in large part an outgrowth of a general increase in the state’s population and its unusual sentencing structure and parole system.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/11/us/11prison.html
Chris Keeley

In 2002 and '03, Danielle Pletka, a Middle East expert at the A.E.I., arranged a series of conferenc

Neo Culpa


Neo Culpa

Please don't call them "architects of the war": Richard (Prince of Darkness) Perle, David (Axis of Evil) Frum, Kenneth (Cakewalk) Adelman, and other elite neoconservatives who pushed for the invasion of Iraq are beside themselves at the result.

by David Rose January 2007

A preview of this article was published on VF.com on November 3, 2006.

Iraq-war cheerleader Richard Perle now says an invasion may have been the wrong way to topple Saddam Hussein. Photographs by Nigel Parry.

I: About That Cakewalk …

I remember sitting with Richard Perle in his suite at London's Grosvenor House hotel and receiving a private lecture on the importance of securing victory in Iraq. "Iraq is a very good candidate for democratic reform," he said. "It won't be Westminster overnight, but the great democracies of the world didn't achieve the full, rich structure of democratic governance overnight. The Iraqis have a decent chance of succeeding."

In addition to a whiff of gunpowder, Perle seemed to exude the scent of liberation—not only for Iraqis, but for all the Middle East. After the fall of Saddam Hussein, Perle suggested, Iranian reformers would feel emboldened to change their own regime, while Syria would take seriously American demands to cease its support for terrorists.

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Chris Keeley

Running with Scissors: A Memoir

Running with Scissors: A Memoir

Running with Scissors: A Memoir  

"Bookman gave me attention. We would go for long walks and talk about all sorts of things. Like how awful the nuns were in his Catholic school when he was a kid and how you have to roll your lips over your teeth when you give a blowjob," writes Burroughs (Sellevision) about his affair, at age 13, with the 33-year-old son of his mother's psychiatrist. Collapse )